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is it hard to get into jobs or schools with depression?

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  • johnnemeH's Avatar
    7 posts since Oct '12
    • job interviews, schools, scholarships? 

      do they look very strictly into people with depression or past records?

      what are the types of depressions that they will look more into?

  • Rednano's Avatar
    6,522 posts since May '08
    • http://hpb.gov.sg/HOPPortal/health-article/10202

      Despite being one of the most common mental disorders, depression is often misunderstood. These myths and misconceptions may contribute to the stigma attached to depression, discouraging those affected to talk about their symptoms or seek help and treatment.

      Here is a list of myths and commonly held misconceptions about depression, and the corresponding facts.

      MYTH: Depression is rare and will not happen to me.
      FACT:
      Depression can happen to anyone, regardless of sex, race or age. It affects 121 million people worldwide1 and is one of the most common mental health problems. The World Health Organization estimates that 5 10% of people may need help for depression at any time and as many as 8 20% of people carry the risk of developing depression during their lifetime2.

      MYTH: Depression is about feeling sad.
      FACT:
      Depression is more than feeling sad. Persistent feelings of sadness is one of the symptoms of depression. However, depression also involves physical symptoms such as changes in appetite and quality of sleep, emotional symptoms such as feelings of worthlessness and changes in behaviour such as the loss of interest in our usual activities. For people experiencing depression, these symptoms continue for more than two weeks.

      See the full list of depression symptoms here.

      MYTH: Depression is a sign of weakness.
      FACT:
      Depression is unrelated to the strength of someone s character; it is a serious medical condition like asthma or diabetes. Depression is often triggered by major life events that may be challenging to cope with, e.g., the loss of a loved one, loss of job, etc.

      MYTH: Depression is temporary and will go away by itself.
      FACT:
      Depression will not go away by itself. It is a medical condition that requires treatment and support. In fact, the symptoms of depression are likely to get worse if left untreated. Thus, it is important to seek help early to prevent depressive symptoms from getting worse.


      MYTH: Depression cannot be treated.
      FACT:
      Depression is among the most treatable of all mental health conditions. The World Health Organization reported that 60- 80% of individuals positively respond to a combination of medication and psychotherapy treatments3. Nevertheless, it is important to understand that treatment for depression takes time and that recovery may take many months.

      MYTH: Depression can only be treated by medication.
      FACT:
      Medication is only one of the available options for treatment of depression. Depression may also be treated using psychological intervention or counselling, lifestyle changes etc. The treatment needs of each individual may be different. Some people may find medication most effective, for others psychological intervention may be most helpful; a combination of treatments may work best for others. Thus, it is best to approach a mental health professional to find out more about different types of treatment and to develop an individualised support plan.

      http://www.hpb.gov.sg/HOPPortal/health-article/340

      In some people, depression can be so severe that it dominates their lives, preventing them from coping as they used to, and losing interest in things that they used to enjoy. Depression of this degree is an illness and needs treatment.

      Depression is a medical illness. It is not due to moral weakness or a character flaw. It cannot be willed or wished away.

      What are the types of depression?

      Major depression is manifested by a combination of symptoms that affect our work, interests and feelings towards family and friends. These disabling episodes can occur twice or several times in a lifetime.

      Dysthymia is a less severe type of depression. People with dysthymia have long-term depressive symptoms and it prevents them from functioning at an optimal level.

      Symptoms of depression

      Certain characteristic symptoms can give you or your family a clue that you are depressed:

      • Depressed or low mood
      • A loss of interest and enjoyment in life
      • A lack of drive or motivation that makes even simple tasks or decisions difficult or impossible
      • Feeling tired all the time
      • Agitation or restlessness
      • Loss or gain in appetite with loss or gain in weight
      • Sleeplessness or excessive sleeping
      • Loss of self confidence, avoiding people
      • Feeling useless, inadequate, helpless or hopeless
      • Feeling guilty or worthless
      • Thoughts of suicide

      What are the causes of depression?

      Some types of depression run in families, indicating hereditary or genetic factors in the transmission of depressive disorders. In some families, major depression seems to occur generation after generation.

      Studies have also suggested some biological component in depression. It may be associated with having too little or too much chemicals in the brain. Certain medications have mood altering properties. Antidepressant medication act by altering and normalizing the biochemical imbalances in the brain.

      Life events such as loss of a job, retirement, divorce, death of a loved one or moving to a new house can precipitate a depressive illness. Social circumstances also play a part. If we are alone, have few or no friends, suffer from a chronic illness, then we may be more vulnerable to depression.

      People with life threatening or long-term physical illness such as cancer, stroke, arthritis or heart disease are also more vulnerable to depression. Personality may also play a part in depression. Some of us are more vulnerable than others because of the individual make-up or early life experiences.

      Very often, a combination of genetic, psychological and environmental factors is involved in the onset of depression.

      The good news is that whatever the cause, depression is treatable.

      How is depression treated?

      Treatment for depression is well established. 85% of people with major depression have fairly good treatment outcome. Treatment consists of drug (antidepressant medication) and non-drug therapy. Usually, a combined treatment is best: medication to gain relatively quick relief and psychotherapy to learn more effective ways to deal with life stresses.

      http://www.hpb.gov.sg/HOPPortal/article?id=10210

      What is depression?

      What is depression?

      Depression is more than feeling down or being sad. Depression may affect your work, interest in activities and quality of life. It is not a sign of weakness and it does not just 'go away'. Depression can happen to anyone.

      Depression is a medical condition that affects how you think and behave, and the way you feel and function. It is one of the most common mental health problems and is faced by over 121 million people worldwide1. In Singapore, an estimated 5.6% of the population are affected by depression during their lifetime2.

      Learn more about myths and common misconceptions about depression.

      How to recognise depression

      Depression is different from normal sadness as it interferes with your day-to-day life making it hard for you to work, rest and have fun. People with depression experience five (5) or more of the following symptoms almost every day, for two weeks or longer:

      • Persistent sadness or emptiness
      • Loss of interest in all or almost all activities
      • Decrease or increase in appetite; unintentional weight loss or gain
      • Difficulty in sleeping or sleeping excessively
      • Restlessness or feeling agitated
      • Fatigue and lacking in energy
      • Difficulty concentrating or having trouble thinking and making decisions
      • Frequent thoughts of death or suicide
      • Feelings of worthlessness or excessive guilt

      Feel down? Got the blues? Losing interest in activities you used to enjoy? Take our quiz to find out if you may be experiencing symptoms of depression.


      Risk factors for depression

      Challenging life events can increase your risk of depression especially when you find it difficult to cope with them. Some of the life stressors that can increase the risk of depression may include:

      • Relationship problems
      • Financial difficulties
      • Physical illnesses
      • Unemployment
      • Lack of support
      • Loss of a loved one

      Learn more about stressors and get some tips to help you cope with the stressors in your life.

      Reducing your risk for depression

      The risk for depression can be reduced by adopting a healthy lifestyle and maintaining your mental well-being. Having a positive mental well-being will help you manage life challenges, solve problems and achieve your goals, thereby reducing the overall vulnerability to mental health problems.

      Learn more about stressors and get some tips to help you cope with the stressors in your life.

      Managing depression

      Of the various mental disorders, depression is one of the most treatable. The World Health Organization estimates that treatment is effective for 60-80% of those affected1.

      Depression can be managed using a range of different strategies including medication, counselling or psychological intervention and lifestyle changes. Treatment plans may differ, depending on the individual's symptoms and personal and medical history. As depression presents a range of symptoms that relate to our physical functioning, thinking, feelings and behavior, a combination of strategies are often employed to address these different aspects.

      Medications used to treat depression are known as antidepressants. They help to regulate mood and can only be prescribed by a doctor. On average, antidepressants require three to four weeks of regular dosages before the full treatment benefit will be experienced. Even when used regularly, antidepressants are not addictive.

      Counselling or psychological intervention can also help individuals cope with life stressors and reduce the symptoms of depression. These sessions focus on teaching positive styles of thinking, managing our emotions and how to deal with the symptoms of depression and day-to-day challenges. Counselling and psychological interventions may also equip people with the knowledge and skills to optimise their mental well-being, identify the early warning signs of depression and prevent further periods of depression.

      When and where to seek help

      There are many treatment and support options available for people who may be suffering from depression. It is recommended that you seek help once the symptoms begin to interfere with one or more aspects of your life (e.g. withdrawal from friends and social activities, decreased ability to concentrate and make decisions at work etc).

      Depression is highly treatable and is most effectively managed through early detection and treatment. The earlier you seek treatment the more effective the treatment will be. Thus, it is preferable to approach your general practitioner once you experience symptoms that concern you, even if you are unsure. If you think that someone close to you may be showing signs of depression, you could speak to the person and encourage him or her to see a doctor.
      With early detection and help, you can beat the blues.

      Here's a list of mental health support services available in Singapore.

      Edited by Rednano 28 Oct `12, 9:42PM
  • speakoutfor's Avatar
    838 posts since Jan '12
    • Depends..

      If your ex-employer is evil, they will reveal your past depression records (discplicnary action) to your new employer when making cross reference. But rest assured, you can discuss this with your ex-employer and maybe your HR will have the mercy not to reveal this info to any prospective employer. I have a friend who discuss this with his ex-employer before he left, so they parted good ways and agreed not to damage each other's future prospects.

      But I think if you went to a private clinic on your own accord and got diagnosed, its not really a big deal because its personnel and confidential info that doctors cannot disclose.

      If you have this record at school, who cares? So as long as your depression didn't result you in going crazy and start bashing up other classmates. The thing about employers is, they look at your highest qualification. So if you have degree, then they won't be bothered about your school CCA or bullshit stuff like that.

  • johnnemeH's Avatar
    7 posts since Oct '12
    • Originally posted by speakoutfor:

      Depends..

      If your ex-employer is evil, they will reveal your past depression records (discplicnary action) to your new employer when making cross reference. But rest assured, you can discuss this with your ex-employer and maybe your HR will have the mercy not to reveal this info to any prospective employer. I have a friend who discuss this with his ex-employer before he left, so they parted good ways and agreed not to damage each other's future prospects.

      But I think if you went to a private clinic on your own accord and got diagnosed, its not really a big deal because its personnel and confidential info that doctors cannot disclose.

      If you have this record at school, who cares? So as long as your depression didn't result you in going crazy and start bashing up other classmates. The thing about employers is, they look at your highest qualification. So if you have degree, then they won't be bothered about your school CCA or bullshit stuff like that.

      If I disclose my depression when they ask if I have mental illness, will I have the chance to explain what was my condition about? I'm very worried because I'm going to apply for university, and they ask if there is any mental illness.

      What are the consequences if I do not disclose it?

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    264,495 posts since Dec '99
    • it is a condition, not an illness. 

      if it is under control, u shd not worry abt it

      it is ok for others to know, so tt they know how to help u with it or at least be careful and not make it worse unintentionally

  • Uraniumfish's Avatar
    1,972 posts since Mar '08
    • Originally posted by FireIce:

      it is a condition, not an illness. 

      if it is under control, u shd not worry abt it

      it is ok for others to know, so tt they know how to help u with it or at least be careful and not make it worse unintentionally

      Also, there are 2 types, clinical depression which is caused by chemical imbalance in the brain, and reactive depression which is extreme sadness at an emotional (not neurological) level.

  • johnnemeH's Avatar
    7 posts since Oct '12
    • Originally posted by FireIce:

      it is a condition, not an illness. 

      if it is under control, u shd not worry abt it

      it is ok for others to know, so tt they know how to help u with it or at least be careful and not make it worse unintentionally

      So I don't need to disclose it in the application form?

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    264,495 posts since Dec '99
  • Angjaydyn's Avatar
    159 posts since Sep '09
    • you see no point informing or telling people that u got depression when ppl just simply dont understand.

      the society will just label you as something...

      only like your doctors, families, friends that you relate more in your life, then only you break out your depression to.

    • you can however share your story of depression as a testimonial after you have overcome it.

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    264,495 posts since Dec '99
    • do not need to feel inferior or afraid of wat others will think.

       

      depression can never be cured totally

      but it can be managed and under control

  • M the name's Avatar
    1,763 posts since Mar '09
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