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Dual Citizenship Dilemma of a SG-US man: Renounce/ NS Matter

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  • Kpsimmer's Avatar
    1 post since May '13
    • Hi.

       

      I'm currently a 16 year Old, American/Singapore Dual Citizen

       

      I left Singapore when I was 6 months and moved to the UK and returned in late 2011 at the age of 14. I  have only ever studied under the UK system and still study under the system and thus have never had a local education.

      I only ever planned on living in Singapore until I finished my A Levels, so before I go off to University and also planned on revoking my Singapore Citizenship.

      To add to this I am also a homosexual, and thus not eligible I presume for standard NS.

      As I have read I believe it is far too late for me to revoke without having to do NS and I feel that it  has caused a certain disruption to my plans to leave to studay in America for University.

      I would like to know where I stand in terms of having to do NS, What I would be doing in NS and What purpose I would have doing it since it has really upset me that I most likely won't be able to start my education in Uni on time.

      Since my situation is rather strange I haven't been able to get any sort of information elsewhere about a case like mine so any assistance would be wonderful.

       

      Thank You

  • Moderator
    eac's Avatar
    4,047 posts since Dec '03
    • Source: http://singapore.usembassy.gov/dual_nationality.html

      While recognizing the existence of dual nationality, the U.S. Government does not encourage it as a matter of policy because of the problems it may cause. Dual nationality may hamper efforts by the U.S. Government to provide diplomatic and consular protection to individuals overseas.  When a U.S. citizen is in the other country of their dual nationality, that country has a predominant claim on the person.  A foreign country might claim you as a citizen of that country if (a) you were born there; (b) your parent or parents (and sometimes grandparents) are or were citizens of that country or (c) you are a naturalized U.S. citizen but are still considered a citizen under that country’s laws.  (The oath you take when you are naturalized as a U.S. citizen (8 CFR 337.1) doesn’t mean the foreign country does not still regard you as a citizen of that country.)  Public inquiries about the citizenship laws of other countries should be directed to the embassy or consulate of that country in the United States.  8 U.S.C. 1185(b) (Section 215(b) INA) and 22 CFR 53.1 require that U.S. citizens exit and enter the United States on a U.S. passport, with certain limited exceptions (22 CFR 53.2).

      Under Singaporean law, an individual who automatically acquires Singaporean citizenship at birth retains that status even after acquiring U.S. citizenship. Singapore does not recognize dual nationality beyond the age of 21. 

      If you wish to renounce your U.S. citizenship, please send an email with your full name, date, place of birth, U.S. passport number and residency status in Singapore to [email protected]

      Further Information:

       

      A U.S. citizen who is a resident or citizen of a foreign country may be subject to compulsory military service in that country. Although the United States recognizes the problems that may be caused by such foreign military service, there is little that we can do to prevent it since each sovereign country has the right to enact its own laws on military service and apply them as it sees fit to its citizens and residents.

      Military service by U.S. citizens may cause problems in the conduct of our foreign relations since such service may involve U.S. citizens in hostilities against countries with which we are at peace. For this reason, U.S. citizens facing the possibility of foreign military service should do what is legally possible to avoid such service.

      Federal statutes long in force prohibit certain aspects of foreign military service originating within the United States. The current laws are set forth in Section 958-960 of Title 18 of the United States Code. In Wiborg v. U.S. , 163 U.S. 632 (1896), the Supreme Court endorsed a lower court ruling that it was not a crime under U.S. law for an individual to go abroad for the purpose of enlisting in a foreign army; however, when someone has been recruited or hired in he United States, a violation may have occurred. The prosecution of persons who have violated 18 U.S.C. 958-960 is the responsibility of the Department of Justice.

      Although a person's enlistment in the armed forces of a foreign country may not constitute a violation of U.S. law, it could subject him or her to Section 349(a)(3) of the Immigration and Nationality Act [8 U.S.C. 1481(a)(3)] which provides for loss of U.S. nationality if an American voluntarily and with the intention of relinquishing U.S. citizenship enters or serves in foreign armed forces engaged in hostilities against the United States or serves in the armed forces of any foreign country as a commissioned or non-commissioned officer.

      Military service in foreign countries, however, usually does not cause loss of citizenship since an intention to relinquish citizenship normally is lacking.  In adjudicating loss of nationality cases, the Department has established an administrative presumption that a person serving in the armed forces of a foreign state not engaged in hostilities against the United States does not have the intention to  relinquish citizenship.  On the other hand, voluntary service in the armed forces of a state engaged in hostilities against the United States could be viewed as indicative of an intention to relinquish U.S. citizenship.

      Pursuant to Section 351(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, a person who served in foreign armed forces while under the age of eighteen is not considered subject to the provisions of Section 349(a)(3) if, within six months of attaining the age of eighteen, he or she asserts a claim to United States citizenship in the manner prescribed by the Secretary of State.

      See also information flyers on related subject available via the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs home page on the internet at http://travel.state.gov. These flyers include:

      QUESTIONS

      For further information, please contact:

      Express Mail:
      Director
      Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Legal Affairs (CA/OCS/L)
      Overseas Citizens Services
      Bureau of Consular Affairs
      U.S. Department of State
      4th Floor
      2100 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
      Washington, D.C. 20037
      Phone:  202-736-9110
      Fax:  202-736-9111

      Regular Mail
      Director
      Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Legal Affairs (CA/OCS/L)
      Overseas Citizens Services
      Bureau of Consular Affairs
      U.S. Department of State
      SA-29, 4th Floor
      Washington, D.C. 20520

      01/10/2013

    • Refer:

      1. http://sgforums.com/forums/1390/topics/455920

      2. http://sgforums.com/forums/1390/topics/422850

      3. http://sgforums.com/forums/1390/topics/315302

    • Tue, Sep 06, 2011
      AsiaOne.com

      SINGAPORE - Dr Yaacob Ibrahim, the Minister for Information, Communication and the Arts, has refuted online speculation that his son will not serve National Service (NS).

      Dr Yaacob's 16-year-old son carries dual citizenship in Singapore and the United States. He was issued US citizenship as his mother is an American citizen by birth.

      The issue of his son's citizenship was made public when a leaked US diplomatic cable published by WikiLeaks identified the minister's two children as US citizens.

      It then made its way into online forums where some netizens speculated that Dr Yaacob's son will not serve NS. Other netizens called for Dr Yaacob to clarify the matter.

      Dr Yaacob's press secretary confirmed yesterday that the minister's son will serve NS just as his father did.

      What the cable said:

      "Yaacob Ibrahim has been Minister of Environment and Water Resources since 2004, following two years as Minister of Community Development and Sports. In 2002, he was appointed Minister-in-Charge of Muslim Affairs.

      "He was first elected to parliament in 1997 and was quickly promoted to the sub-cabinet position of Parliamentary Secretary at the Ministry of Communications in 1998.

      "In December 2004, he was selected Vice Chairman of the People's Action Party's policy-making Central Executive Committee.

      "Since his college days, Yaacob has been very involved in Singapore's Muslim organizations. He was a youth member of the Muslim Missionary Society (Jamiyah) and is a long-time volunteer at MENDAKI (the leading Malay/Muslim education self-help group linked to the government).

      "He was also actively involved with the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore (MUIS), serving on its council from 1992-1996. As Minister-in-Charge of Muslim Affairs, he has encouraged community organizations to specialize and avoid duplication of services. He has also been given a role in Singapore's outreach effort to the Middle East.

      "In 2004, he led two business delegations to the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, and Egypt. While in Egypt, he met with Singaporeans studying at Al-Azhar University, as part of the government's efforts to ensure that its citizens studying in the Middle East keep Islamic teachings in a Singapore context.

      "Several contacts have asserted that, since his hajj in February 2004, Yaacob has become less of an integrationist. These contacts said he has come to believe that there were two distinct spheres in Singaporean society: public and private.

      "While he envisioned that Singaporeans of all races would continue to interact in the public sphere in areas of common interest, they could choose to limit their private interactions to people of the same race and religion.

      "Dr. Yaacob was born in Singapore on October 3, 1955, the fourth of nine children of a minor civil servant.

      "All of his siblings have excelled as professionals. His eldest brother was the first Malay chosen as a Presidential scholar and a younger sister is political editor for the Straits Times.

      "He graduated from the University of Singapore with a Civil Engineering degree in 1980. He obtained a scholarship to do his Ph.D. at Stanford University.

      "He graduated in 1989 and worked subsequently as a Post-Doctoral Fellow at Cornell University. His wife is an American citizen who grew up in Puerto Rico.

      "Yaacob told emboff that he has a more open-minded interpretation of the Koran and said his wife converted to Islam to satisfy the conservative standards of Singapore. They have two children, both American citizens, and they travel to the U.S. frequently to visit his wife's family."

    • Dual citizenship is generally not recognised in Singapore, but is possible up to the age of 22. Such dual citizens may have acquired citizenship by birth in a foreign country, from a foreign citizen parent, or by naturalisation. Singaporean citizens who acquire citizenship of a foreign country after the age of 18 may lose Singaporean citizenship. Foreigners who naturalise as Singaporean citizens are required to renounce all foreign citizenships. Minors who are dual or multiple citizens by birth on foreign soil, by descent from foreign parents or by naturalisation are required to renounce all foreign citizenships by the age of 22 or may lose their Singaporean citizenship.

      The prohibition of dual citizenship is a contentious issue in Singapore. As the economy becomes more globalized and Singaporeans more mobile, many Singaporeans have acquired foreign citizenships and reluctantly renounced their Singaporean citizenship even though they may feel a strong emotional attachment to Singapore. Immigrants who have been resident in Singapore for long periods and qualify for Singaporean citizenship may be reluctant to become naturalized citizens as it would mean giving up the citizenship of their native countries. Those who are dual citizens at birth may find it unjust that they are denied their birthright to citizenship of other countries where they were born or that of their parents. Male dual citizens are also not allowed to renounce Singaporean citizenship after the age of 11 and before attaining majority at the age of 21, such that they have to serve National Service at the age of 18 for a country to whom allegiance they may almost immediately abjure.

      The government's rationale for not allowing dual citizenship is that Singapore is a young and vulnerable nation which cannot afford to allow its citizens multiple allegiances which may be compromised in times of national crisis. Citizens without a second citizenship may feel aggrieved if dual citizens enjoy the benefits of citizenship during periods of wealth but leave the country in trying times. Nevertheless, the government is open to the possibility of allowing dual citizenship if local and global circumstances demand so.

      Male Singaporeans cannot renounce citizenship until completing national service.

    • Source:

      www.mfa.gov.sg/content/mfa/overseasmission/washington/consular_services/wstcon_renouncesc.html

      Renunciation of Singapore Citizenship

      A citizen of Singapore can only renounce his/her Singapore citizenship if he/she is of or over the age of 21 years and has acquired citizenship of another country. To obtain the Application for Renunciation of Citizenship package, please email the Singapore Embassy and provide your full name (as in your NRIC/Singapore passport), NRIC, date of birth, gender and contact details. The application package will include instructions, forms and list of documents to be submitted.

       

      PROCESSING FEE:

       

      US$27.00

       

      NOTES:

       

      1. All renunciation applications are processed by the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority in Singapore. Processing time is approximately 3 to 4 months from the date of receipt of the complete application package.

      2. Once processed and approved, the ICA will send you a letter (or through the Embassy) stating that you are no longer a citizen of Singapore.

      3. Please make sure to provide your updated / preferred mailing address.

      4. For CPF withdrawal procedures, please contact the CPF directly or visit their website at www.cpf.gov.sg

      ADDITIONAL NOTES IF YOU ARE APPLYING THROUGH:

       

      1. SINGAPORE EMBASSY IN WASHINGTON DC
        3501 International Place NW, Washington, DC 20008
        Hours: 9.00am – 1.00pm and 2.00pm – 5.00pm, Mondays to Fridays
        1. Please issue a cashier’s cheque or money order in US currency made payable to the "Singapore Embassy". Personal/corporate checks are not accepted.
        2. Payment by exact cash if applying in person. Do not send cash through the mail.
        3. To facilitate the return of your documents by post, please provide a self-addressed and stamped US Postal Service (USPS) Express Mail Flat Rate envelope OR a self-addressed prepaid envelope from a courier service of your choice. For the latter, please make sure that pick-up service from our location is available.

      2. SINGAPORE CONSULATE-GENERAL IN SAN FRANCISCO
        595 Market Street, Suite 2450, San Francisco, CA 94105
        Hours: 9:00am to 12:00pm and 2:00pm to 4:00pm, Mondays to Fridays
        www.mfa.gov.sg/sanfrancisco

        1. Please issue a cashier’s cheque or money order in US currency made payable to the "Singapore Consulate-General".
        2. To facilitate the return of your documents by post, please provide a self-addressed and stamped US Postal Service (USPS) Express Mail/Priority Mail envelope OR a self-addressed prepaid envelope from a courier service of your choice. For the latter, please make sure that pick-up service from the Consulate is available.

      3. SINGAPORE CONSULATE IN NEW YORK
        231 East 51st Street, New York, NY 10022
        Hours: 9.00am - 1.00pm, Mondays to Fridays
        www.mfa.gov.sg/newyork-consul
        1. Please issue a cashier’s cheque or money order in US currency made payable to "The Consulate of Singapore".
        2. To facilitate the return of your documents by post, please provide a self-addressed and stamped US Postal Service (USPS) Express Mail envelope. Federal Express, DHL, UPS, Airborne, Certified mail, etc. are not acceptable.

      4. SINGAPORE CONSULATE-GENERAL IN MIAMI
        2601 South Bayshore Drive, 9th Floor, Coconut Grove, FL 33133
        Hours: 9:00am - 4:00pm, Mondays to Fridays
        www.mfa.gov.sg/miami
        1. Please issue a cashier’s cheque or money order in US currency made payable to the "The Consulate of Singapore". Personal/corporate checks are not accepted.
        2. To facilitate the return of your documents by post, please provide a self-addressed and stamped US Postal Service (USPS) Express Mail Flat Rate envelope OR a self-addressed prepaid envelope from a courier service of your choice. For the latter, please make sure that pick-up service from the Consulate is available.

      5. SINGAPORE CONSULATE-GENERAL IN CHICAGO
        Mr Newton N. Minow, c/o Sidley Austin LLP One South Dearborn 24th Floor, Chicago, Illinois 60603
        Hours: 8:30am - 4:30pm, Mondays to Fridays
        www.mfa.gov.sg/chicago
        1. Please issue a cashier’s cheque or money order in US currency made payable to the "The Consulate of Singapore". Personal/corporate checks are not accepted.
        2. To facilitate the return of your documents by post, please provide a self-addressed and stamped US Postal Service (USPS) Express Mail Flat Rate envelope OR a self-addressed prepaid envelope from a courier service of your choice. For the latter, please make sure that pick-up service from the Consulate is available.

      SINGAPOREANS RESIDING IN CANADA

       

      Singaporeans residing in Canada can apply through the Singapore Consulate-Generals in Vancouver or Toronto. The contact details are:

       

      Consulate-General of the Republic of Singapore - Canada (Vancouver)
      1095 West Pender Street
      Vancouver, BC V6E 2M6
      Canada

      Tel : 604-622-5281
      Fax : 604-685-2471
      E-mail : [email protected]

      Website: http://www.mfa.gov.sg/vancouver

       

      Consulate-General of the Republic of Singapore - Canada (Toronto)

      80 Richmond Street West

      Suite 1401 Toronto Ontario

      M5H 2A4, Canada

      Tel : 416-477-2503

      Fax : 416-477-2506

      E-mail : [email protected]

      Website: http://www.mfa.gov.sg/toronto

      Edited by eac 11 May `13, 11:36PM
    • National-service-liable males who migrated from Singapore before age 11 and have not enjoyed significant socio-economic benefits of citizenship (e.g., applied for a Singapore identity card or studied in Singapore beyond the age of 11) are allowed to renounce their Singapore citizenship, but not before they turn 21.

      Until then, they are required to register for national service with Central Manpower Base and apply for a deferment.

      After turning 21, they are then eligible to renounce their Singapore citizenship.

      Generally, those who left Singapore after the age of 11 will be deemed to have enjoyed the socio-economic benefits of Singapore. They will not be allowed to renounce their Singapore citizenship without fulfilling NS obligations.

  • Rednano's Avatar
    6,522 posts since May '08
  • SJS6638's Avatar
    5,614 posts since Nov '11
    • Those who are liable to serve national service but refuse are charged under the Enlistment Act. If convicted, they face three years' imprisonment and a fine of S$10,000.

      Controversy arose when the penalties were increased in January 2006 after Melvyn Tan, who was born in Singapore, received a fine for defaulting on his National Service obligations. Tan left for London to study music during his enlistment age and later acquired British nationality. In parliament, Defence Minister Teo Chee Hean provided some illustration of the punishments defaulters would face:

       

      • Where the default period exceeds two years but the defaulter is young enough to serve his full-time and operationally ready NS duties in full, MINDEF will press for a short jail sentence.

       

      • Where the defaulter has reached an age when he cannot serve his full-time NS in a combat vocation or fulfil his operationally ready NS obligations in full, a longer jail sentence to reflect the period of NS he has evaded may be appropriate.

       

      • Where the defaulter has reached an age when he cannot be called up for NS at all, a jail sentence up to the maximum of three years may be appropriate.

       

      Each year, a small number of people are convicted for their failure to enlist or refusal to be conscripted. Most of them were Jehovah's Witnesses, who are usually court-martialled and sentenced to three years' imprisonment, but they are usually held in a low-security detention facility and separated from other conscription offenders. The government does not consider conscientious objection to be a legal reason for refusal to serve NS.

      Edited by eac 25 Mar `14, 8:11PM
  • Moderator
    eac's Avatar
    4,047 posts since Dec '03
    • If you are 13 years old and above, you are subject to exit controls if you leave Singapore for 3 months or longer.

      If you are between 13 and 16 1/2 years old

      If you are overseas for 3 months or longer but less than 2 years, you need to apply for an exit permit.

      If you are overseas for 2 years or more, you need to apply for an exit permit and a bond is also required. The bond amount is $75,000 or an amount equivalent to 50% of the combined annual gross income of both your parents for the preceding year, whichever is higher.

      If you are above 16 1/2 and yet to be enlisted for NS

      If you are overseas for 3 months or more, you need to apply for an exit permit and a bond is required. The bond amount is $75,000 or an amount equivalent to 50% of the combined annual gross income of both your parents for the preceding year, whichever is higher.

      Why must MINDEF impose exit controls on NS-liable males?

      Exit controls are necessary to ensure that NS-liable males who have gone overseas to study or reside at a young age return to fulfil their NS responsibilities.

      Will young males aged 13 to 16.5 who fail to apply for an exit permit be sentenced to imprisonment?

      The penalty for exit permit offences of young males aged 13 to 16.5 will be a fine of up to $2,000, with no custodial sentences. They will however be subjected to harsher penalties should they continue to breach of the Enlistment Act after age 16.5.

      Males above 16.5 years who travel and remain overseas without applying for an exit permit would have committed an offence under the Enlistment Act. They will be liable upon conviction to a fine of up to $10,000 or imprisonment for a term not exceeding 3 years or both.

  • Rednano's Avatar
    6,522 posts since May '08
    •  

      Think about it...

      If you run away, not only you, your parents pay the price too.

      $75,000 of their money will be forfeited and gone to Singapore's $ State Reserve Fund.

      The bond amount is $75,000 or an amount equivalent to 50% of the combined annual gross income of both your parents for the preceding year, whichever is higher.

      You will not be able to travel to Singapore, even while on transit/ connecting flights...

      If you want to meet your parents/ relatives living in Singapore, either they take a flight to visit you or both parties travel to neighouring Malaysia's Johor state to meet you.

  • Moderator
    eac's Avatar
    4,047 posts since Dec '03
    • Refer:

       

      http://sgforums.com/forums/1390/topics/409095

       

      Edited by eac 11 May `13, 11:41PM
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