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Which petrol is better?

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  • Lowe1's Avatar
    12 posts since Feb '08
    • I am pumping Shell 98 now for Honda Civic. Have been thinking of changing to Esso.

       

      1) Is it advisable to change petrol from one company to another?

      2) Shell petrol is better or Esso?

  • alleggerita's Avatar
    8,119 posts since Aug '06
    • 1) I think it is absolutely fine to pump fuels from different companies. But people just don't like to change company, dunno why. Petrol is petrol, no difference in chemical make up even if it's different companies like Shell, Caltex, Esso, etc. The only diffference is the RON rating.

      The only thing that's going to harm the engine is too low octane, causing the engine to knock. So be sure to read your car's manual to find out what's the lowest RON rating your car's engine can take. Usually the higher the capacity the engine is, it will need fuel of higher RON rating. Small engines maybe minimum RON92, bigger engines maybe minimum RON95.

      2) Not too sure whether Shell or Esso is better. But a lot of people say Shell's petrol is more powerful, no matter is it RON95 or RON98.

      And I think this is because when you see the fuel says RON98, it does not necessarily mean the fuel has an octane rating of exactly 98, it might be a bit more or less. RON98 is just naming the fuel. So maybe Shell's Formula98 has a higher octane maybe at 98 point something and maybe other companies' RON98 fuel only has 97.9807 (example only).

      This is just my simple explanation, explaining why maybe you'll feel Shell's fuel is more powerful than other companies' fuel of similar rating of RON98.

      But I personally feel Shell's fuel is the most powerful among the different petrol companies in SG.

  • BangHong's Avatar
    1,163 posts since Sep '03
    • changing from company

      why? - company offer better offers? points to exchange goodies?

      The petrol is almost the same... For most car 95 is enough, even you pump 98 you may end up damaging your car, do you know that? i remember reading the newpaper article challenge from sg to kl there... So really depends, most car will go well with 95.

      Why dont you consider CNG? =]

  • n0x's Avatar
    1,723 posts since Mar '06
    • all petrols are the same....

      and regarding the ron ratings.. i think allgeritia has got it spot on...

      most people tend to wrongly associate high octane(ron) ratings with higher performance....

      truth is only high performance cars with high compression engines need fuel with high octane rating...

      so i guess this is where all the misunderstanding arose from...

      i am driving an altis 1.6.. i read the manual.. and it might shock a lot of people here but the recommended octane rating for my engine is 91....

      so actually 92 is enough but to be on the safe side 95 is reccomended.. but with the ever increasing petrol prices i might have to think twice now...

  • alleggerita's Avatar
    8,119 posts since Aug '06
    • Originally posted by n0x:

      all petrols are the same....

      and regarding the ron ratings.. i think allgeritia has got it spot on...

      most people tend to wrongly associate high octane(ron) ratings with higher performance....

      truth is only high performance cars with high compression engines need fuel with high octane rating...

      so i guess this is where all the misunderstanding arose from...

      i am driving an altis 1.6.. i read the manual.. and it might shock a lot of people here but the recommended octane rating for my engine is 91....

      so actually 92 is enough but to be on the safe side 95 is reccomended.. but with the ever increasing petrol prices i might have to think twice now...

      Don't be shock. People in the US still pumping 91 and 92 regularly. 98 is unheard of to them. icon_lol.gif

  • kentheman's Avatar
    1,339 posts since Jan '05
    • actually the different brands do make a difference. and different makes sometimes cannot take certain brand.

      for eg, my dad's altis can only take esso and shell. if pump SPC and caltex, the FC drop like mad and no power.

      my car cannot take shell 95, will get sucky FC and loss of power, but caltex and esso 95 work fine for me. so far, V-power i get the best FC and can feel the power. maybe it's psychology, but i do feel the difference

  • NoobBOY's Avatar
    751 posts since Nov '07
    • Higher octane of petrol  will just slightly reduce the chance of getting detonation

  • veron soh's Avatar
    882 posts since May '05
    • Originally posted by alleggerita:

      Don't be shock. People in the US still pumping 91 and 92 regularly. 98 is unheard of to them. icon_lol.gif


      Americans uses a diffrence ratings,their 91 octane is using the M.O.N. system,so it is actually 98 octane R.O.N. in our markets.

  • alleggerita's Avatar
    8,119 posts since Aug '06
    • Originally posted by veron soh:


      Americans uses a diffrence ratings,their 91 octane is using the M.O.N. system,so it is actually 98 octane R.O.N. in our markets.

      Oh i see. My bad. icon_redface.gif

  • Matthiessen's Avatar
    19 posts since Dec '07
    • Originally posted by kentheman:

      actually the different brands do make a difference. and different makes sometimes cannot take certain brand.

      for eg, my dad's altis can only take esso and shell. if pump SPC and caltex, the FC drop like mad and no power.

      my car cannot take shell 95, will get sucky FC and loss of power, but caltex and esso 95 work fine for me. so far, V-power i get the best FC and can feel the power. maybe it's psychology, but i do feel the difference

      So far I've been pumping 95 from Shell. A friend of mine once mentioned the grade of petrol used affects the engine sound generated so I gave V power a shot.

      No idea whether it's psychological too but I noticed better FC for sure, engine sound remained the same.

  • alleggerita's Avatar
    8,119 posts since Aug '06
    • Originally posted by NoobBOY:

      Higher octane of petrol  will just slightly reduce the chance of getting detonation

      Yeah that's true. Actually, contrary to belief, the higher the octane, the harder it is to make the fuel combust and not vice versa.

      Edit: Typo

      Edited by alleggerita 26 Apr `08, 5:04PM
    • Originally posted by Matthiessen:

      So far I've been pumping 95 from Shell. A friend of mine once mentioned the grade of petrol used affects the engine sound generated so I gave V power a shot.

      No idea whether it's psychological too but I noticed better FC for sure, engine sound remained the same.

      You noticed better power with V-Power probably because V-Power has a SLIGHTLY higher octane than the Formula98. And there's cleaning agents in V-Power, helping to get rid of carbon deposits in the engine and making it more powerful.

      Added: Or maybe the octane is the same as the Formula98, but it's the cleaning agents making the difference.

      Edited by alleggerita 26 Apr `08, 5:06PM
  • Matthiessen's Avatar
    19 posts since Dec '07
    • Originally posted by alleggerita: You noticed better power with V-Power probably because V-Power has a SLIGHTLY higher octane than the Formula98. And there's cleaning agents in V-Power, helping to get rid of carbon deposits in the engine and making it more powerful.

      Added: Or maybe the octane is the same as the Formula98, but it's the cleaning agents making the difference.

      Hi alleggerita,

      So generally speaking, petrol with higher octane provides better power. But what about some comments saying it's possible for 98 and above types to damage your engine (read Banghong)?

      If V power provides better FC, then I may think of switching over from 95. 95 is cheaper, but FC is lousier. V Power more expensive, but better power and FC. If that's the case, might as well go for a better grade? I'm driving a 2.0 tucson.

       

  • alleggerita's Avatar
    8,119 posts since Aug '06
    • I recommend you calculate just how much fuel can you save when compared to using Formula95. Then see how long you'll need to break even from spending extra paying for V-power. If it takes too long like 2-3 years, forget it. Stick with Formula95. icon_lol.gif

      I've never heard of engines getting damaged by fuels of too high octane. Only too low an octane will damage the engine due to engine knocking. In UK, they even have RON100 fuel. Heard it makes the car much more powerful than pumping RON98 fuel.

      Added: I believe high octane won't damage engine. Because an engine with minimal modifications (mostly modifications to the fuel supply line only) can take methanol as an alternative fuel. And methanol can reach RON115.

      Edited by alleggerita 26 Apr `08, 5:16PM
  • Matthiessen's Avatar
    19 posts since Dec '07
    • Originally posted by n0x:

      all petrols are the same....

      and regarding the ron ratings.. i think allgeritia has got it spot on...

      most people tend to wrongly associate high octane(ron) ratings with higher performance....

      truth is only high performance cars with high compression engines need fuel with high octane rating...

      so i guess this is where all the misunderstanding arose from...

      i am driving an altis 1.6.. i read the manual.. and it might shock a lot of people here but the recommended octane rating for my engine is 91....

      so actually 92 is enough but to be on the safe side 95 is reccomended.. but with the ever increasing petrol prices i might have to think twice now...

      Quite true. Advice from some folks at the petrol kiosks once said there is no need for high octane petrol unless it's for continental cars.

  • alleggerita's Avatar
    8,119 posts since Aug '06
    • Originally posted by Matthiessen:

      Quite true. Advice from some folks at the petrol kiosks once said there is no need for high octane petrol unless it's for continental cars.

      And the reason why continental cars usually need fuels with higher octane rating is because they usually have large engine capacities like the 525i, S350, 730Li, A8 3.2, etc.

      But even the smaller capacity continental cars don't necessarily need fuels with high octane rating. Like the 320i, C180K/C200K, Golf 1.6/1.4/2.0, etc. RON95 should be more than enough.

      For my father's Kia Picanto 1.1, only RON92 is needed. For my uncle's S40 2.4i, minimum is RON95, RON92 might cause knocking.

  • Matthiessen's Avatar
    19 posts since Dec '07
    • Originally posted by alleggerita:

      I recommend you calculate just how much fuel can you save when compared to using Formula95. Then see how long you'll need to break even from spending extra paying for V-power. If it takes too long like 2-3 years, forget it. Stick with Formula95. icon_lol.gif

      I've never heard of engines getting damaged by fuels of too high octane. Only too low an octane will damage the engine due to engine knocking. In UK, they even have RON100 fuel. Heard it makes the car much more powerful than pumping RON98 fuel.

      Added: I believe high octane won't damage engine. Because an engine with minimal modifications (mostly modifications to the fuel supply line only) can take methanol as an alternative fuel. And methanol can reach RON115.

      Doesn't sound like it's going to make much difference in the end. Guess I'll try it out for a month. If cost differences are not worth it, then it makes sense to stick to 95 since petrol costs are escalating so quickly!

      Thanks :)

  • alleggerita's Avatar
    8,119 posts since Aug '06
    • But no harm pumping V-Power occasionally to let it clean away the carbon deposits in the engine. In SG's start-stop traffic conditions, very easily will have carbon deposits build up in the engine.

      Equivalent for V-Power is Caltex's Techron Platinum.

  • Matthiessen's Avatar
    19 posts since Dec '07
    • Originally posted by alleggerita:

      But no harm pumping V-Power occasionally to let it clean away the carbon deposits in the engine. In SG's start-stop traffic conditions, very easily will have carbon deposits build up in the engine.

      Equivalent for V-Power is Caltex's Techron Platinum.

      Will it damage the engine if I mix different grade of petrol in one tank? Say half 95 and I choose to top up with vpower or techron platinum?

      There are also different theories saying FC is better if you make a habit of keeping the tank full. Others say FC is better when you keep fuel amount on the low. What are your thoughts?

      Shell offers the discount sometimes if you pump Vpower between 7-11pm on certain days.

  • alleggerita's Avatar
    8,119 posts since Aug '06
    • Originally posted by Matthiessen:

      Will it damage the engine if I mix different grade of petrol in one tank? Say half 95 and I choose to top up with vpower or techron platinum?

      There are also different theories saying FC is better if you make a habit of keeping the tank full. Others say FC is better when you keep fuel amount on the low. What are your thoughts?

      Shell offers the discount sometimes if you pump Vpower between 7-11pm on certain days.

      Another common misconception, I believe there's no problem mixing fuel of different octane rating in one tank.

      And I believe in the latter. Keeping the tank full will only add weight to the vehicle and increase FC. Keeping fuel in the tank low will keep weight down and reduce FC. Just imagine your tank is 50-litres, 50-litres of petrol weighs about 45-48kg I guess. About the weight of a passenger already.

      But I also believe that the difference is not that drastic.

  • Matthiessen's Avatar
    19 posts since Dec '07
    • Originally posted by alleggerita:

      Another common misconception, I believe there's no problem mixing fuel of different octane rating in one tank.

      And I believe in the latter. Keeping the tank full will only add weight to the vehicle and increase FC. Keeping fuel in the tank low will keep weight down and reduce FC. Just imagine your tank is 50-litres, 50-litres of petrol weighs about 45-48kg I guess. About the weight of a passenger already.

      But I also believe that the difference is not that drastic.

      That was my take initially until one old guy at the workshop said it really depends on how you look at it because with fuel sloshing about in the tank, apparently the lesser fuel left, the more violent the sloshing, FC is affected as well.

      I have no idea how accurate that theory is, a little warped maybe?

      Thanks for the tips.

  • alleggerita's Avatar
    8,119 posts since Aug '06
    • I don't see how sloshing of fuel in the tank will affect FC. Unless he's talking about the unstable supply of fuel to the engine. Which in any case, also won't increase FC. Just my own opinion. icon_mrgreen.gif

  • NoobBOY's Avatar
    751 posts since Nov '07
    • Properties of fuels => A good gasoline should have:

      1) A Proper Volatility

      2) High Octane Number

      3) High Calorific Value

      4) Good Flash Point

      5) Good Fire Point

  • Naughtius Maximus's Avatar
    108 posts since May '07
    • As mentioned, most petrol types are fairly similar. The key is not to be a heavy-footed driver. Don't floor the accelerator every chance u get. I'm using Shell 98 too, V-Power on occasion. Too pricy and pointless. Got buddies who say SPC was okay but that was years ago. Now everyone is bumping prices... angry.png 

  • caleb_chiang's Avatar
    10,446 posts since Jul '05
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