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Everything You Need To Know -- The KL-SG High Speed Rail

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  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    262,390 posts since Dec '99
    • Everything You Need To Know About The KL-SG High Speed Rail

       

      Great news for those who frequent Malaysia! As many of us have heard, there will be an all-new high-speed rail (HSR) line from KL to Singapore. Operations are expected to start around 2026, and this news has been confirmed by the signing of MoU yesterday after years of talking about it. Here’s everything you need to know about the HSR and how it’s finally possible.

      giphyImage: giphy.com

      Traveling to and fro Malaysia will be made easier

      Many of us Singaporeans love to visit Malaysia, either for food and entertainment or simply to visit some distant relatives. Traveling to Malaysia will be made more convenient by the HSR, in addition to the recently started shuttle bus from Singapore to JB. Travel time to KL via the HSR will be approximately a whopping 90 minutes!


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      8 train stops and top speed of 300km/h

      The two terminus will be at Jurong East (Singapore) and KL (Malaysia). There will be a total of 8 stops; starting with Singapore, Iskandar Puteri, Batu Pahat, Muar, Ayer Keroh, Seremban, Putrajaya and Kuala Lumpur respectively. HSR trains will operate both ways, and the traveling time between Singapore to JB (Iskandar Puteri) will only take 10 to 15 minutes. The top speed is expected to reach 300km/h, so you can think of your ride as a mini-bullet train experience if you haven’t manage to take one!

      Both Singapore and Malaysia will be developing and constructing HSR

      Land Transport Authority (LTA) will be taking charge from Singapore’s end, unlike the speculated rumors that said SMRT would be responsible for HSR. MyHSR Corporation will be in-charge from Malaysia’s end and both Singapore and Malaysia will be maintaining civil infrastructure and stations within their own countries. The two operating companies, OpCo International and OpCo Domestic will be handling Kuala Lumpur and Singapore stations while the third domestic operator will handle stations within JB to KL.

      There might be co-locating of CIQ checkpoints

      Plans of co-locating the checkpoints have been going on to promote a hassle-free travel. This meant that commuters might be able to clear Singapore immigrations and Malaysian immigrations before boarding the train.



      HSR trains will be 10 cars long, fitting 100 per car

      That means each train can take around 1000 passengers!

      Top Image: http://highspeedrail.my/

       

       

      goodyfeed

  • ^Acid^ aka s|aO^eH~'s Avatar
    31,262 posts since Oct '02
  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    262,390 posts since Dec '99
  • ^Acid^ aka s|aO^eH~'s Avatar
    31,262 posts since Oct '02
    • haben learn fly wan learn teleport

       

       

       

       

      meanwhile the train will breakdown anot?

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    262,390 posts since Dec '99
    • S'pore to KL in 90mins: What u need to know abt the High Speed Rail that will be up by 2026 http://ebx.sh/29Uhjwn 

    • Originally posted by ^Acid^ aka s|aO^eH~:

       

      meanwhile the train will breakdown anot?

      according to minister, if we choose to take at the same time, then train cannot handle

       

  • ^Acid^ aka s|aO^eH~'s Avatar
    31,262 posts since Oct '02
    • minister gong jiao wei in progress again...

      ask u dun buy cars, take public transport... but public transport unreliable...

       

       

      They only need to wayang take bus take mrt once in awhile and let people take foto only...

  • EMERGENCY AMBULANCE
    QX179R's Avatar
    80,248 posts since Feb '08
    • Japanese operators confident of winning bid to develop KL-Singapore High-Speed Rail

      SINGAPORE: Japanese rail operators stand a “very high” chance of winning the bid to develop and run the upcoming High-Speed Rail (HSR) between Singapore and Kuala Lumpur, said Japanese Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism Keichi Ishii.

      Mr Ishii attributed the Shinkansen's (Japanese bullet train) safety track record, reliability and comparatively low costs to giving Japanese rail operators an edge over the rest. 

      Speaking on the sidelines of the second High-Speed Rail Symposium in Singapore on Friday (Jul 22), Mr Ishii reaffirmed Japan’s strong interest in the project, which aims to cut travel time between Singapore and Kuala Lumpur to 90 minutes. 

      Singapore and Malaysia signed a landmark Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) earlier this week, laying out the regulatory and financing framework for the project. Rail services are expected to begin in 2026, and tenders for the operators are expected to be called by 2023.

      Mr Ishii did not give a cost estimate, as he said this would be based on future project specifications. But he added that Japan’s private and public sector will support the project “in terms of finance, human development, and development of facilities surrounding the terminal stations.”

      The event, organised by several Japanese government and transport associations, featured several presentations on the Shinkansen train model. One speaker, East Japan Railway Company’s executive vice president Yuji Fukasawa, laid out the operator’s plan to develop the Kuala Lumpur-Singapore HSR within seven years. This includes conducting study tours to Japan, test runs and on-site training.

       “We would like to transfer the Shinkansen technology to the countries, and also provide help in human resources development,” Mr Fukasawa told Channel NewsAsia following his presentation. But he also acknowledged that there were several challenges in developing the project.

      “If we talk about HSR in general, we need many passengers to ride on the trains - so in terms of competition with the airlines, how much market share can we grab from the airlines?”

      Another challenge is the cross-border nature of the project, a sentiment echoed by a Ministry of Land, Infastructure, Transport and Tourism Railway Bureau director, Tomohiro Kobayashi.

      “I think what makes this project very challenging, is that it is dealt between two countries,” he said. “So you have to deal with this border security management ... this is something that we do not see when we run the Shinkansen just within Japan,” said Mr Kobayashi.

      As part of the MoU signing, both Singapore and Malaysia agreed to common customs, immigration, and quarantine facilities in Kuala Lumpur, Iskandar Puteri and Singapore, so commuters can avoid multiple checks.

      About 300 leaders and members of the Japanese, Singapore and regional transport community attended the symposium, including companies and government officials. Senior Minister of State for Ministry of Transport Josephine Teo was in attendance.    

      - CNA/am
  • Eelvwm's Avatar
    2 posts since Sep '16
    • For a city state like Singapore with land shortage and small
      in size with distance from state border to CBD not more than 20 km it is really
      not advisable to have a high-speed train line unless it is done with the
      purpose of future extension to Indonesian via Batam Island. This is same case with Hong Kong. From the start Hong Kong should not have
      proceeded to build the costly line of 20km or so. The high-speed rail should be
      terminated at the border at Shenzhen.
      The traveling time for the passengers going to CBD in both cases will be
      almost the same whether the high-speed stops at the border or the CBD.

      For Singapore it is more practical and pragmatic to contribute some construction cost for Malaysia to build the terminal beside or underneath the Johore Bahru immigration and customs check point. The passengers coming to Singapore can then take a special transport from there It could be much faster and cheaper for the passengers to arrive at Singapore CBD, not to say of those heading to suburbs around the city.

       

    • It is alleged:  Mr Ishii attributed the Shinkansen's (Japanese bullet train) safety track record, reliability and comparatively low costs to giving Japanese rail operators an edge over the rest.

       

      In reply to the abovementioned statement we no doubt admire the safety record of Japanese bullet train but we should not ignore that fact that the Chinese safety record has been  also good despite the major fatal accident five or six years back. This accident could be a minor accident if it happened on ground level with just a minor impact of the train from behind during an extreme bad storm weather and to cause the derail of one or two cars. The two trains were traveling on high level rail track about 15-meter high. The dislodged cars thus plunged about 15 meters to the ground.  

       

      It also edged:  As part of the MoU signing, both Singapore and Malaysia agreed to common customs, immigration, and quarantine facilities in Kuala Lumpur, Iskandar Puteri and Singapore, so commuters can avoid multiple checks

       

      Though it was preliminarily agreed to have one check-point of customs and immigration for two countries but it would involve quite a great number of issues and might not be easy to get the approval of the parliaments of the two countries.

       

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