01 Nov, 10:17AM in sunny Singapore!

The relevance of A-Level Economics

Subscribe to The relevance of A-Level Economics 13 posts

Please Login or Signup to reply.
  • MoltenFalcon's Avatar
    429 posts since Aug '11
    • Hello there, I have a question.

      I’m currently studying in JC and I am tentatively in the Physics-Chemistry-Maths-Econs stream for my JC, with H2 for PCM and H1 for E.

      I wish to know how taking Economics would affect the chances of entering a good university. I am also considering appealing for a different stream, namely Physics-Chemistry-Maths-H1 Literature.

      I am rather enthusiastic at Literature and as such, I am wondering whether I should just “go for it” and if it would affect my chances of entering a good university.

      I am probably aiming for future courses in Chemistry, though, and I’m probably going to try my very best for UC Berkeley or similar-standard universities.

      Would dropping Economics be detrimental, given I already have more than a basic understanding of the key points of Economics, and have little to no interest in the market?

  • Mad Hat's Avatar
    91 posts since May '10
    • No dropping Econs won't be detrimental. It won't make any significant difference whether you take Econs or Lit to your chances of getting into a good university. Follow your passion!

  • MoltenFalcon's Avatar
    429 posts since Aug '11
    • Originally posted by Mad Hat:

      No dropping Econs won't be detrimental. It won't make any significant difference whether you take Econs or Lit to your chances of getting into a good university. Follow your passion!

      Thank you for your input!

      Would JCs normally place PCML students apart from PCME students?

  • Mad Hat's Avatar
    91 posts since May '10
    • Sure thing you're welcome. But this last question I wouldn't know the answer. Someone else on the forum might know though ..

  • SJS6638's Avatar
    4,938 posts since Nov '11
    • check on the criteria from your favourite unis.

      Econ is a boring subject   ..........   dragged going for the lessons ................

  • Ekompute's Avatar
    6 posts since Feb '13
    • Can't agree more with Mad Hat... "follow your passion" is an advice that is more than its weight in gold. Sad are those who don't know their passion but sadder are those who failed to follow their passion. I learn that through a costly experience...

  • SBS2601D's Avatar
    8,408 posts since Apr '05
    • I would personally feel that economics at A level was a great tool in understanding much of what goes on around us.

      But I buy the argument that following your interest should take precedence.

      Nonetheless we might not know fully if our interest is really such at this point, and in such cases, I would just "follow the heart" and not look back.

      Good luck.

  • Moderator
    Chemguide7's Avatar
    170 posts since Jul '11
    •  

      Another point is that you may find out the distinction rate for lit. Lit is rather subjective and maybe harder to score.

      Econs is more marketable, but your interests are important too.

  • MoltenFalcon's Avatar
    429 posts since Aug '11
    • Hello all,

      Thanks for all your replies! They've really helped me with understanding what I would be getting myself into.

      However, I would also want to ask about some other questions.

      1) The scores obtained in the A-levels are also calculated in the University Admission Score (UAS). Do US/UK universities pay attention to this score? 

      2) Do universities take CIP hours into account?

      3) Are certificates of participation from competitions involving the subject being majored, such as the Olympiads, accepted as valid documentation during application?

      Thanks!

  • Moderator
    Chemguide7's Avatar
    170 posts since Jul '11
    • Pardon me, I am off the tangent. I am a chem major and IMHO, I would like to inform you that this degree is not the "best" "marketable" degree.

      Money wise, your earning power may not be that fantastic compared to that of banking and finance.

      This degree is rather limiting in the type of careers you can do.

      However, having an Ivy League degree sets you apart, and you may go into govt Admin dept and be a high flier there. But a finance degree is much more practical.

      About undergrad life, The lab chemicals are real switch off for me. I walked past a NUS chem lab, smelled some funny gas, and I got a sore throat for weeks. You need to be able to endure the "toxic" chemical effects. After 6 hr of lab non-stop, my shirt smells like the chemicals. My research lab nearly caught fire after my PhD mentor forgot to switch off the power supply to a distillation device. These are the adventures of chem students. But theoretical chem can be real interesting.

      But if you are real interested in chem, then go for it. Get a PhD and be a prof or start a research company and do R&D. Sometimes, you can strike millions if you are the science entrepreneur. Prof also earns well but not as well as high flying finance professionals. If you are going to the US, then maybe you can consider staying there as the chem there is more advanced than Sg. The scientific culture is there. However, the Indians are getting the chem jobs as their pay are real low and the US chemists are not happy.

      Edited by Chemguide7 20 Feb `13, 9:10AM
    • Research funds to many uni in Europe and US are also cut due to the economy.

      Watch where you are heading into.

       

      Edited by Chemguide7 20 Feb `13, 9:11AM
  • Lee012lee's Avatar
    703 posts since Oct '08
    • Pay wise

      SMU economics graduate starting pay is $3999 in 2012

      NUS bachelor of science graduate starting pay is $2741 in 2012.

      source : http://www.salary.sg/2012/graduate-employment-survey-2011-published-2012/

  • Moderator
    Chemguide7's Avatar
    170 posts since Jul '11
    • This is median pay, and there are many factors in determining the pay of a graduate, eg. the degree and the Honours class.

      But MoltenFalcon is not so interested in the markets, so I wonder if he wants to pursue his interests in chem or lit?

      Someone who is in a field just for the money and not for interest may be bound to a desk bound job who reports to profit-maximisation bosses with strict HR policies.

      It is a corporate jungle out there. It is really survival of the fittest.

Please Login or Signup to reply.