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A-level chemistry queries

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  • hoay's Avatar
    174 posts since Jul '11
    • Simple molecular structures have intermolceualr forces.

      what about Giant covalent sturtucres. Do they have intermolecular forces? they have lots of strong covalent bonds which need very high eenrgy to be broken down.

      Except graphite which has VDW forces, in diamond if there are two units of diamond won't they have VDW forces bewteen them?  

       

  • Moderator
    H2 Chemistry @ BedokFunland JC (near VJC & TJC)
    UltimaOnline's Avatar
    14,517 posts since May '05
    • Originally posted by hoay:

      Simple molecular structures have intermolceualr forces.

      what about Giant covalent sturtucres. Do they have intermolecular forces? they have lots of strong covalent bonds which need very high eenrgy to be broken down.

      Except graphite which has VDW forces, in diamond if there are two units of diamond won't they have VDW forces bewteen them?  

       


      Yes, there are always van der Waals forces between molecules in close proximity, even giant ones. But such forces would exist only if you place 2 diamonds next to each other, touching. And even then, the van der Waals forces would be ridiculously weak (ie. just blowing onto 2 little diamonds can easily separate them), while the tetrahedral covalent lattice within each diamond (ie. that's one giant molecule for you, so gigantic that the diamond molecule is visible to your naked eye (otherwise your girlfriend would certainly dump you) and (if you're really rich) the diamond molecule might even be larger than your belly button) is so ridiculously strong, it's basically the hardest natural material known to man.

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