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  • kinwashi's Avatar
    10,941 posts since Jan '08
    • Hanami Guide

              posted by John Spacey, October 08, 2015


      Dead bodies are buried under the sakura!

      This is a popular Japanese saying about cherry blossoms, better known assakura in Japan. It comes from the start of a famous short story entitled Under The Cherry Trees by Motojiro Kajii:

      Dead bodies are buried under the sakura! You have to believe it. Otherwise, you couldn't possibly explain the beauty of the sakura blossoms. I was restless, lately, because I couldn't believe in this beauty. But I have now finally understood: dead bodies are buried under the cherry trees! You have to believe it. — Motojiro Kajii

      The saying expresses a sense of disbelief at the beauty of sakura blossoms and suggests that history somehow adds to this beauty.

      Hanami Parties

      Hanami can be translated "flower viewing". It's the custom in Japan of having parties under sakura trees when they bloom in early spring. The term can also apply to taking a walk under the trees.Hanami parties are remarkably popular in Japan with virtually the entire country participating.It's customary for people to reserve party spots under the trees with blue plastic mats. In some cases, people arrive 12 hours before a party to lay down a mat. Junior salarymen are often selected for this important mission before a company hanami party.People treat the blue mats as they would the floors in a Japanese house — you need to remove your shoes before stepping on the mat.Another old Japanese saying about cherry blossoms is "dumplings over flowers." It means that people are often more interested in the food and drink at hanami parties than the flowers themselves.You might expect flower viewing parties to be a quiet, introspective event. However, most hanami parties are fun filled. It's not usual for a DJ to play music at full concert volume in a park. Drinking in the great outdoors is a Japanese tradition. People prepare lavish picnics for hanami.

      Hanami from Helsinki to Hawaii

      Hanami festivals are held in more than 20 countries. They are particularly common in countries with a large Japanese community.
    • Or maybe you may love this?

       

      video.

      Originated  From Japan.

       

      https://youtu.be/jqpFjsMtCb0

      Edited by kinwashi 06 May `16, 10:17PM
  • Cyberbtm's Avatar
    5 posts since May '16
    • And less pple willing to spending = less pax for Td

      Domino effect for spore economy.

      Affected one another.

  • kinwashi's Avatar
    10,941 posts since Jan '08
    •  

      And less pple willing to spending = less pax for Td

      Domino effect for spore economy.

      Affected one another.

      Edited by kinwashi 09 May `16, 11:02PM
    • Junior Salary Men Defend Good Hanami Flower Viewing Spots

              posted by John Spacey, January 30, 2012


      Junior salary men are assigned a critical mission during hanami (cherry blossom viewing) season — secure a good spot under the trees and defend it.Popular parks fill up early during hanami season. Junior salary men are sent out as early as 10 AM to reserve spots. Most juniors enjoy the job. It's a good break from the pressures of the office. They sit in the park watching the girls walk by all day.Sometimes a more senior salary man grabs this choice assignment.These days, mobile devices mean that many juniors are expected to work while reserving a spot.Around 6 PM the first coworkers start to join — the party begins. By 10 PM everyone is enjoying the party.
    • Why You Should Never Pick a Sakura Petal

              posted by John Spacey, May 26, 2014


      Hanami parties have a relaxed and fun filled atmosphere. There aren't many rules of etiquette associated with hanami.The one thing that you should never do is pick sakura petals or branches. There are several reasons for this.

      Common Sense

      Popular hanami spots are filled with thousands of people night after night. If everyone picked the flowers they'd be gone quickly. Everyone hopes that hanami will last as lost as possible.

      Cultural and Religious Significance of Sakura

      Sakura are deeply engrained in Japanese culture.According to Japanese Buddhist traditions, falling sakura petals represent the impermanence of life. Sakura petals only live a week. They bloom brilliantly and fall with the wind. The beauty of falling sakura has been the topic of countless Japanese poems and songs.For hundreds of years, sakura petals have also symbolized warriors. Samurai ideals stated that a warrior should live passionately and die young. This was symbolized by sakura petals.According to Japanese cultural traditions, falling sakura petals represent the reincarnated souls of warriors who fell in battle.

      Likely Reaction

      If you pick a sakura petal in Japan people will likely feel uncomfortable but probably won't say anything. If you pick a branch (even a small one) people will likely speak up.

      History

      In the Edo-era people did pick Sakura as part of hanami celebrations. This died out some time in the Meiji-era (1868 ~ 1912).
    • 10 Strange Japanese Festivals

      Japan has gained a lot of attention around the world thanks to its unique customs and culture. Here are some traditional festivals that are weird even for Japan.


      This post is also available in: Chinese (Traditional)

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      1. Tounin Gyouji [Akita]

      20

      oganavi.com

      Do you know the story Yamata no Orochi? Simply put, it’s a story in which Susanoo, the god of storms, killed an eight-headed eight-tailed serpent in order to save a damsel in distress from being eaten. It’s a very cool story, and this festival is held every year in honor of it.

      The reason this festival is called strange is because of the event in the photo, the “ushinori gyouji,” or “the cow ride.” A single man rides upon the back of the cow. That man is Susanoo. Unlike in the story, the festival has him mostly unconscious, a far cry from the cool image he has in the story. Why he’s unconscious is a mystery.

      HP www.oganavi.com/event/20.php (Japanese Only)

      Place: Katagami-shi, Akita

      Date: July 7th

      2. Kokusekiji Sominsai [Iwate]

      PWTfE2

      asakusaomatsuri.com

      This strange image of a bunch of half-naked men is actually the Kokusekiji Sominsai, a festival with a history of more than 1000 years in which the men are struggling to get a bag that has “sominsai” printed on it. The man who has it in the end is said to be blessed. All these men fighting with all their hearts in the bitter cold to become blessed makes it closer to a sport than a festival. Actually, this festival is open to anyone who applies, but there are rules like you can’t eat meat, fish, eggs, or garlic for a week before the festival, so it’s actually pretty difficult…

      HP https://www.city.oshu.iwate.jp/kanko/view.rbz?cd=1599 (Japanese Only)

      Place:Mizusawaku Kuroishicho, Oshu, Iwate

       

      Dates: January-March

      3. Otatue Matsuri [Ehime]

      016

      landweb.blogspot.jp

      The sight of a wrestler wearing a loincloth, the gorgeously dressed referee, the dirt arena – as long as you know a little bit about Japan, you know that this all points to one sport, and that’s sumo. However, the sumo match that’s part of this rice-planting festival is a little different from the sumo matches you’re familiar with. The challenger is a deity. If the deity wins the match against the human wrestler then it’s a promise that the year’s harvest will be abundant. Of course, you can’t see the deity, but you can enjoy the sight of the wrestler desperately doing his best to win. Every year the deity wins with 2 wins 1 loss.

      HP  http://www.go-shimanami.jp/event/?a=127 (Japanese Only)

      Place:Oyamazumi Shrine, Omishimacho Miyaura, Imabari, Ehime

       

      Dates: June

      4. Kanamara Matsuri [Kanagawa]

      o0480036011177800160 [

      ameblo.jp

      If we’re talking about festivals with impact, then it’s this fertility festival. In recent years, this festival has become really popular among foreign tourists and every year it gets bigger and bigger. By the way, the phallus in the top photo is, for some reason, named Elizabeth.

      HP http://kawasakidaishi-kanko.com/wakamiyahachimangu/ (Japanese Only)

      Place:Kanayama Shrine, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa 

      Date:The first Sunday of April 

      5. Paantu Punaha [Okinawa]

      3CKWHM

      blogs.yahoo.co.jp

      When you were a child, did your parents ever say “the monsters will get you” if you ever did anything bad? In Okinawa’s Miyakojima, those children are told “the paanto will get you.” This festival is one meant to banish bad luck, and during it people dress up as paanto and cover themselves and everything else in mud. It doesn’t matter if you’re from the town, a tourist, if the house is brand new or if you just washed your car – it will get covered in mud. 

      HP www.churashima.net/shima/miyako/pantoo/index.html (Japanese Only)

      Place: Miyakojima-shi, Okinawa

      Date: early September on the lunisolar calendar

      6. Onbashira Matsuri [Nagano]

      15NVuV

      nagano-tabi.net

      The Onbashira Matsuri is a festival that takes place once every seven years. The sight of 16 huge trees being brought in from the mountains only by manpower in order to replace the pillars of the temple certainly has an impact. The “kiotoshi,” where the men slide down the steep hill riding the huge tree is a sight that will leave an impression.

      HP http://www.onbashira.jp/ (Japanese Only)

      Place:Shimosuwa

      Dates: April 2-10 every 7 years

      7. Hetomato [Nagasaki]

      photo2_312

      navi.gotoshi.net

      What does “hetomato” mean? Actually, no one knows. And no one knows how this festival started, either. A huge straw zori sandal is held by young people, and if they discover unmarried woman, they put her atop the zori and lift it up high.

      HP http://navi.gotoshi.net/contents/detail/index.php?id=312 (Japanese Only)

      Place: Shimosakiyamacho, Goto, Nagasaki

      Dates: The third Sunday of every January 

      8. Akutai Matsuri [Ibaraki]

      EHde7s

      asakusaomatsuri.com

      The surprising thing about this festival is that it’s a festival where the spectators boo men in white clothes as stress relief. This is great for people who have bottled up their resentment or have something they want to yell. By the way, before the festival starts, they have a contest in which the person who can yell an insult in the loudest voice wins. 

      HP http://www.kasama-kankou.jp/upsys_pro/index.php?mode=detail&code=450 (Japanese Only)

      Place: 102 Izumi, Kasama-shi, Ibaraki

      Dates: End of December 

      9. Muon Bon Odori [Aichi]

      prm1508160027-p1

      sankei.com

      If you see this festival in photos, then it looks like a regular Japanese festival. However, this festival is silent. The dancers dance along to music they’re listening to through headphones, so spectators don’t hear anything. Of course, this only started in recent years, because people in the neighborhood complained about the noise. 

      HP http://www.medias.ne.jp/~%20goro23/ (Japanese Only)

      Place: Otamachi, Tokai-shi, Aichi

      Dates: early August

      10.Rokugo no Takeuchi [Akita]

      A59dBZ

      blog.livedoor.jp

      The sight of people hitting each other with plenty of bamboo will make you think you’re in the Warring States period. Since it’s a furious battle, there are injuries. The scariest part is that in the beginning the bamboo is really long so you it’s just blunt hits, but once it breaks it becomes sharp enough to be very dangerous.

      HP http://www.rokugo-mizu.net/maturi/maturi1.html (Japanese Only)

      Place: Hondomachi Rokugo, Misato-cho, Senboku-gun, Akita

      Dates: February 15th

    • Pretty in pink: Spectacular photographs reveal how Japan and South Korea are transformed by blooming cherry blossom trees

      • The images were taken by two photographers during the annual celebrations in South Korea and Japan last year
      • Yoshiki Fujiwara travelled to Kyoto, Kansai and Honshu while Jessica Wry went to Gunhangje festival in Jinhae
      • Celebrations of the cherry blossoms are happening again at the end of March and beginning of April this year

      By QIN XIE FOR MAILONLINE

      PUBLISHED: 12:36 GMT, 24 March 2016 UPDATED: 13:40 GMT, 24 March 2016

       

      •    
      •  
      •  
      1.2kshares

      11

      View comments

       

      New shoots and first blooms are nature's signal that spring has arrived - even if warmer weather hasn't made an appearance.

      As these vibrant photographs show, cherry blossom trees are set to create glorious floral displays around the world.

      These stunning images, taken in Japan and in South Korea, show their picturesque landscapes being transformed into a sea of pink as cherry trees bloom. 

       

      Scroll down for video 

      Jessica Wry took this image at the annual Gunhangje Festival in Jinhae, South Korea. The 10-day festival returns again from April 1
      +11

      Jessica Wry took this image at the annual Gunhangje Festival in Jinhae, South Korea. The 10-day festival returns again from April 1

      Yoshiki Fujiwara travelled around Japan to trail cherry blossoms. Above, the flowers are seen at night time in the Okayama Prefecture
      +11

      Yoshiki Fujiwara travelled around Japan to trail cherry blossoms. Above, the flowers are seen at night time in the Okayama Prefecture

      Two locals walk on a rail tracks under the blossom in Jinhae. The pink flowers contrast sharply with the green of the bushes below
      +11

      Two locals walk on a rail tracks under the blossom in Jinhae. The pink flowers contrast sharply with the green of the bushes below

      Tokyo residents enjoy the year's first stunning cherry blossoms
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      Each year the incredible sights attract hoards of tourists and photographers, hoping to capture the perfect picture.

      In Japan, cherry blossoms are called Sakura. It is considered the country's national flower and a symbol of renewal and hope, as it heralds the arrival of spring each year.

      The country even has its own word for cherry blossom flower viewing - 'hanami'. 

      There are festivals that take place all over the country, with different dates according to the bloom forecast.

      In some places, the petals appear as early as January but the peak bloom time for the delicate flowers is late March to early April.

      Different installations appear at Gunhangje Festival when the cherry blossoms are in full swing. There are also many cultural events
      +11

      Different installations appear at Gunhangje Festival when the cherry blossoms are in full swing. There are also many cultural events

      In the Nara prefecture, Japan, the incredible blossoms, illuminated by lights in the night, are reflected back in the still waters below
      +11

      In the Nara prefecture, Japan, the incredible blossoms, illuminated by lights in the night, are reflected back in the still waters below

      Beside a canal in the Shiga Prefecture, Japan, the branches of the cherry trees are weighed down by the heavy flowers they carry
      +11

      Beside a canal in the Shiga Prefecture, Japan, the branches of the cherry trees are weighed down by the heavy flowers they carry

      Yoshiki Fujiwara, a photographer based in Japan, has travelled to different parts of the country, including Kyoto, Kansai and Honshu, to capture the cherry blossom in 2015. 

       

      Some of his images showed the surreal landscape covered in pink while in others, the bright flowers are nestled amongst forest green trees.

      Canadian student Jessica Wry visited Gunhangje festival in Jinhae, South Korea last year.

      She said: 'I had travelled to many amazing places in Asia, but seeing the cherry blossoms for the first time in Jinhae was one of the best, it was a very exciting experience.

       

      'It was an amazing feeling being totally surrounded by the blossoms everywhere I went, and the petal covered city seemed almost surreal and magical.

      'It was fun to watch the petals flying around and to see all of the excited festival go-ers strolling along the boardwalks.'

       

       

       

      Another shot taken in the Nara Prefecture, Japan, shows cherry trees in bloom amongst the forest green of the other trees around it
      +11

      Another shot taken in the Nara Prefecture, Japan, shows cherry trees in bloom amongst the forest green of the other trees around it

      PIC BY YOSHIKI FUJIWARA/ CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Gunhangje Festival in Jinhae, South Korea) - Bloomin lovely! These beautiful images of Cherry blossom prove spring has finally sprung! The beautiful collection of images show cherry blossom trees blooming in their pink, floral glory across the world. The photographs were taken in the Kyoto, Kansai and Honshu regions of Japan and at the Gunhangje festival in Jinhae, South Korea. Cherry blossoms is called Sakura in Japan, where it are the countrys national flower and a symbol of renewal and hope, as it heralds the arrival of spring each year. SEE CATERS COPY.
      +11

      A close up of the flowers taken at Gunhangje Festival shows their delicate petals huddled together. Some are still in their unfurling bud

      Surreal: These cherry blossoms in Japan, in a staggering number of different shades, almost appear as though they've been created with paint
      +11

      Surreal: These cherry blossoms in Japan, in a staggering number of different shades, almost appear as though they've been created with paint

      Jessica Wry who went to Gunhangje Festival said: 'Seeing the cherry blossoms for the first time in Jinhae was one of the best, it was a very exciting experience'
      +11

      Jessica Wry who went to Gunhangje Festival said: 'Seeing the cherry blossoms for the first time in Jinhae was one of the best, it was a very exciting experience'

      Japan has celebrations for cherry blossoms every year from about the end of March to the beginning of April. There's even a forecast for it 
      +11

      Japan has celebrations for cherry blossoms every year from about the end of March to the beginning of April. There's even a forecast for it 



      Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-3507584/Pretty-pink-Spectacular-photographs-reveal-Japan-South-Korea-transformed-blooming-cherry-blossom-trees.html#ixzz48M8hdhew 
      Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

    • My collection 2016 Sakura from Kyushu.

       

    • My collection 2016 Sakura from Kyushu.

       

    • Where are all the MELONs?

       1,400 melons stolen from farm in Ibaraki

      JAPAN TODAY -- MAY 15
      About 1,400 melons have been stolen from a farm in Ibaraki Prefecture, police said.

       

      On May 12, a grower in Ibaraki town reported the theft to police. The melons, which were ready to be picked, were valued at 700,000 yen, Fuji TV reported Saturday.

      Police said the melons were stolen from a greenhouse sometime between the evening of May 9 and the evening of May 11. The greenhouse wasn't locked.

       

       

      video

      https://youtu.be/axSQO0ZxPDY

      Edited by kinwashi 15 May `16, 10:26PM
    • PInk.

      Sakura.

      Everywhere over here in Japan most favourite.

      even me like to see only Pink Sakura

       

    • The above and the this they are all Sakura.

      Seafront Sakura,

      Only the colour are not the same and the shape of the petals

    • Here again Sakura and Plum blossom.

       

      8 ways to tell a cherry blossom from a plum blossom

      Spring is blooming, but can you tell the difference between those wonderful blossoms?

      CBC News Posted: Apr 02, 2014 12:15 PM PT Last Updated: Apr 02, 2014 6:31 PM PT

      Can you tell the difference between a cherry or a plum blossom. Check out our tips from the Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival.

      Can you tell the difference between a cherry or a plum blossom. Check out our tips from the Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival. (VCBF)

      Close
      Cherry blossoms vs. plum blossoms

      Cherry blossoms vs. plum blossoms 2:11

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      (Note: CBC does not endorse and is not responsible for the content of external links.)

      The pink and white flowers of cherry and plum trees are a tell-tale sign that spring has arrived on the South Coast. The two may look similar, but they are actually two very different trees.

      According to the Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival, there are eight ways to tell if the blossoms you are admiring are from a cherry tree, or a plum tree.

      1. The smell: True cherry blossoms only have a faint smell, with the exception of some rare, mid-season trees. Plum trees, on the other hand, have a strong, flowery smell. If you're following your nose, it's probably a plum tree.

      • Cherry and plum blossoms are a sure sign of spring on B.C.'s South Coast, but can you tell the difference?
      1 of 16

      2. The petals: The oval petals look similar on both trees, but the cherry blossoms have a small split at the end of each petal, while the plum blossoms don't.

      3. The bark: Cherry blossoms have light grey bark with horizontal lines on it. These lines are called "lenticels." Plum trees have dark bark, with no lenticels.

      4. The buds: Plum buds are round, and have one blossom each. Cherry buds are oval, and have several blossoms coming out of each bud.

      5. The leaves: Check the colour of the leaves on the tree. Plum trees have purple or green leaves that appear to be rolled. Cherry trees have green or copper leaves that are folded. 

      Cherry blossom map

      Upload your photos to our cherry blossom map. (CBC)

       

      6. The grafts: Grafts are placed on the upper trunk of the cherry tree. On plum trees, they are placed on the branches, and stick straight up. 

      7. The shape: Step back from the tree, and look at its shape. Plum trees have a round or oval shape, whereas cherry trees have more of an umbrella shape.

      8. The colour: There are more than 54 varieties of cherry trees. The blossoms can be dark or light pink, white, or yellowish. Plum trees have either white or pink blossoms.

    • From Japan.

       

      Video.

       

      https://youtu.be/sB4oQuiX3eM

    • MAY 17, 2016 BY JAPAN TRENDS

      Share:

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      If you have ever attended a baseball or other sports event in Japan, you will likely have spotted the “beer girls“, also known as uriko. These happy-go-lucky ladies can be seen lugging large kegs of beer in backpacks around the stadium stands, invariably in a small uniform regardless of the weather, ever ready to dispense a cup of fresh lager for the thirsty crowds.

      Typically aged between 16 and 25, they carry their wares of beer key, cups and snacks weighing up to 15kg (33 lbs)!

      The Beer Hour Stadium Foamy Head Dispenser now brings the experience of being served by a beer salesgirl to the comfort your home.

      beer hour uriko salesgirl baseball match game foamy froth drink dispenser

      Okay, so it doesn’t actually come with a cute twentysomething lady wearing a uniform and carrying the customarily bulky backpack (known as a “beer shoulder”). But the gun-style dispenser means you can pour a beer in seconds just by attach a can to the top and pressing the “trigger”. Then for the final touch, lightly shake the unit before pressing the back button to dispense cool froth.

      beer hour uriko salesgirl baseball match game foamy froth drink dispenser

      beer hour uriko salesgirl baseball match game foamy froth drink dispenser

      In this amusingly sexist video, the manufacturer shows us the kind of experience you can recreate in the comfort of your home… and also the consumer being ruthlessly targeted.

       

       

      This is actually the latest entry in Takara-Tomy’s best-selling series of “beer foamer” toys known as Beer Hour (it’s a pun, since “hour” sounds like “awa” or bubbles/froth in Japanese). These are designed to help you get a frothy head on a beer poured from a can, which in Japan is how a beer comes served in a bar or izakaya. While such a beverage would get sent back in many other countries, in Japan — especially in the humid summer — a cold froth on the head of a beer is very much what consumers expect and want.

      The Beer Hour Stadium also continues the trend for food and drink “toys” that are practical cooking utensils but also fun, as well as the popularity of “cool beverage” items, especially hits like the Frozen Beer Slushie Maker by Kirin.

    • This picture below will help with some knowledges.

      What is Sakura

      What is Plum Blossom trees look like.

       

       

      Edited by kinwashi 19 May `16, 9:54PM
    • Home > Visiting Japan > Plum festivals - 梅見

      Plum festivals 
      梅見

      11.06.2014

      Before the cherry trees do not overshadow them, it is before the plum blossoms that were walking the Japanese.

      Credit: DR

      Making umeboshi plums by soaking in salt.

      Credit: DR

      Plums are admirable earlier this year, when their flowers bloom, the opportunity to offer the first picnic of the year.

      Credit: DR

      From Tokyo to Kyushu, via Nara and Kyoto, there are many places to watch the plum flower.

      Credit: DR

      The bright pink plum blossoms. It is said that their presence move away evil.

      Credit: Nina Bernardi

      Sweet plum

      Before the cherry was the shade for parties, it was the plum blossoms that swooned the Japanese. A hanami that some still practice.

      The ephemeral nature of cherry blossoms and the belief that gods inhabit these trees has left the plum, or ume in Japanese, off center stage. Imported from China during the eighth century, it is said that plum trees got rid of evil spirits. Thus, they used to be planted near doors which demons or evil spirits were supposed to be, called kimon. Like the cherry, plums come in many varieties and have been cultivated for centuries. Their colors range from white to dark pink. The Japanese often prepare this fruit by marinating it in salt to make the famous "umeboshi". While ume itself is very sweet, umeboshi is very bitter. Plum is also used to make a delicious alcohol called umeshu. Plum trees are particularly admirable at beginning of the year, when their flowers bloom. This is an opportunity for the first picnic of the year, announcing the hot days ahead.

       

      Where to contemplate?

      One can admire many flowering plum trees inKyoto at Kitano Tenmangu Shrine where nearly 2,000 plum trees bloom. The shrine itself is associated with the image of their flowering. Every year on February 25 the temple hosts the Baika-sai Festival or plum blossom festival. In addition to contemplating the trees, you can also stroll through the flea market, monthly and very popular. The highlight of this festival is theoutdoor tea ceremony, hosted by Geiko and Maiko. Prayers begin at 10 am, and the ceremony takes place from 10 am to 3 pm. The Kaju-ji Temple also attracts visitors by the presence of the oldest plum tree in Japan, transplanted from the Imperial Palace. It is advisable to arrive in February to enjoy the most beautiful views of the garden and Mount Daigo in the background.

      Among other places not to be missed is the village of Yoshino in Nara, where you can find the National Chichibu Tama Kai-park. Visit private gardens that open their doors during blooming season. The entrance fee is 200 yen. There are also many local museums in the village.

      To admire the plum blossoms in Tokyo, go to Umeno Koen, or plum park. There are over 120 different species of plum, ranging from red to white and offering an unforgettable fragrance. You can also discover Hanegi Park in Setagaya. Among its 650 plum trees, you can find one named "Omoinomama" that combines red and white on the same flower. Also in Tokyo and popular among students is Yushima Tenjin Temple. It hosts the festival of flowering plum trees from February 8th to March 8th. In the vicinity of the capital is the garden Kairakuen,ranked among the three most beautiful gardens in Japan, and is famous for its 100 varieties of 3000 plum trees.

      In the Kyushu region, go to Kumamoto to admire plums planted on the grounds of the castle, as well as those of Suizen-ji Park, which includes the most beautiful views of the old Tokaido road connecting Edo (old Tokyo) and Kyoto. Finally, in Fukuoka, visit Tenmangu Temple in Dazaifu. Besides being strikingly beautiful, this temple has no less than 6,000 plum trees to delight your senses.

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    • This afternoon two passengers behind were talking about Red Burget had arrived here.

      Ha,

      Red Burger.

      I, joined the conversation and share with them

      Until they also Blurr Blurr..... what colours Burger over in Japan.

      Told them already out last year over in Japan.

       

      The Inside Story on Why Burger King Sells Red Burgers in Japan

      What Better Way to Get Some Brand Attention on a Tight Budget?

      By Angela DolandPublished on July 02, 2015.

      Reprints Reprints

       

      The Aka Samurai from Burger King Japan. There's also a version with chicken.The Aka Samurai from Burger King Japan. There's also a version with chicken.

      Even in a land of relentlessly wacky fast food innovations, Burger King Japan has nabbed a lot of attention with its all-black burgers. There's just something about the sight of pitch-black buns and cheese that really gets to people.

      Starting Friday, Burger King Japan is launching an all-red burger, with red-colored cheese, buns and, obviously, hot sauce. A Google search turned up more than 150 headlines in English alone on the new creation, which will be on sale through August 20.

      The reports have covered the basics, but we wanted to know more. Starting with, why?

      Burger King Japan's general manager for business management, Masanori Tatsuiwa, who worked previously at agencies including Ogilvy & Mather Japan, answered a few questions about the red Aka Samurai Burger (buns and cheese tinted with tomato powder), the black Kuro Burger (which used bamboo charcoal and squid ink), as well as the brand's "flame-grilled" personal fragrance.

      Ad Age: Where do these ideas come from, and what's your process?

      Burger King Japan's black burger.Burger King Japan's black burger.

      Mr. Tatsuiwa: We sit down with marketing and R&D look for something unusual. When we start to think about something, we have taste tests inside the restaurant. We have 93 restaurants in Japan, and we will be opening our 100th restaurant this year.

      At the moment we don't have much ad budget in our hands, so we do almost everything by ourselves. We are not using any creative agencies for these products. And this way we don't need any big money to expand our awareness in the market.

      Burger King is not big compared to the competitor companies in Japan. McDonald's has about 3,000 restaurants in Japan. The local MOS Burger chain has almost 1,400 restaurants. (Editor's note: Burger King re-entered Japan in 2007, after a first attempt had failed after eight years in 2001 amid tough fast food competition.)

      Ad Age: How big is your marketing team?

      Mr. Tatsuiwa: Five people. Including R&D.

      Ad Age: So, why red this time?

      Mr. Tatsuiwa: This is the fourth year we've had a black burger, and we were wanted to have something new happen this year. And we were also thinking about the Burger King "Angry Whopper," (a jalapeno-laden rendition of the classic), that launched in some markets, but with the color the same as usual. Brown. We thought making it red would make people curious and express the hot taste.

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      Ad Age: Are other markets picking up on these ideas?

      Mr. Tatsuiwa: Burger King Singapore has a black burger and a white burger this year. Burger King Malaysia has a black burger called the Ninja.

      Ad Age: On April 1 you had a one-day-only sale of something called "Flame-Grilled Fragrance." (The 1,000-piece limited edition flasks sold for $41 and came with a Whopper. They sold out.) Why a perfume?

      Mr. Tatsuiwa: The idea came from Burger King in the U.S., they had a perfume several years ago. We thought we could use that for April 1, which we already introduced as "Whopper Day" in Japan.

      The word "whopper" means a kind of big lie, and April 1 is April Fool's Day, when people can tell lies or jokes to each other. We applied for and were permitted to have April 1 as Whopper Day in Japan by the Japan Anniversary Association in 2014.

      We were thinking if we announced a launch for this kind of perfume for April 1, some people might think it wasn't true (and that would generate more conversations about it). But we seriously produced this product, and that was very effective. We collaborated with a local perfume company and asked them to produce a flame-grilled smell. It was a very unique order for them. They worked very hard on it.

      Ad Age: How were sales?

      Mr. Tatsuiwa: It was a record for one-day sales on a weekday.

       

    •  

      Burger King Japan to Sell ‘Red’ Burgers

      By 
      WSJ STAFF
      Jun 17, 2015 5:40 pm JST
      The Aka Samurai Chicken burger from Burger King Japan will feature red buns and red cheese.
       
      BURGER KING JAPAN

      Burger King Japan appears to be getting its inspiration from the roulette wheel in coming up with ideas for its latest offerings.

      The fast food chain is taking a chance on an all-red chicken burger that serves as a counterpoint to its limited-time all-black hamburger.

      BURGER KING JAPAN

      Its Aka (“Red”) Samurai Chicken burgers go on sale on July 3 and will sport red buns, red cheese and red hot sauce made from miso and hot pepper.

      Burger King added tomato powder to its buns and cheese to give the sandwiches their bright red color. The latest offering will cost ¥540 ($4.40). Aka Samurai Beef burgers will also be available for ¥690.

      The chain also said that it has improved its black burgers: this year’s version will come with the same black buns, cheese and sauce plus deep fried eggplant. The Kuro Shogun burgers will be available from Aug. 21 for ¥690.

  • Cowiel's Avatar
    8 posts since May '16
  • kinwashi's Avatar
    10,941 posts since Jan '08
    • So had some knowledges from here,

      Where will be the first Perfecture in Japan that receive Sakura.

      First perfecture to welcome is Okinawa from the south than follow upward to the various Perfectures.

       

       

      Don't be like the Minister from neighbouring country said.

      They had given us eleven months of fresh air.

      But he did not know the wind direction blowed from us to his place.

       

      March 28, 2016*RERUN

      Following the Sakura - A Journey of Cherry Blossoms in Japan

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      *You will leave the NHK website.
      Cherry blossoms... People wait eagerly for their blossoms, love the famous scenes of cherry trees in bloom, sense the transience of things as the petals flutter down and then look forward to them just as eagerly again the following spring. Why are the Japanese people so attached to these flowers which announce the coming of spring? A man is so enthusiastic that he gives up his job to follow the blossoms on their half-year, south-north path up the archipelago. A thousand-year old cherry tree, worshipped as a tutelary god, has been treasured over many generations in a humble mountain village. And so it goes on... Every Japanese person has a special, personal recollection of the blossoms. From when the first trees bloom in Okinawa until the last flower in Hokkaido, we follow the cherry blossom front as it moves north across Japan, visiting famous viewing sites in each prefecture. We hear, too, the stories of Japanese people and their cherry blossoms along the way.

      - Okinawa Prefecture
      Japan's first blossoms.

      - Ehime Prefecture
      A paragliding photographer observes the gorgeous swathe of cherry blossoms from the air.

      - Okayama Prefecture
      The village which worships a 1,000-year old cherry tree sits to protect deity.

      - Ibaraki Prefecture
      6th grade primary school children welcome the new first years by carrying the little ones on their backs in parade around the schoolyard cherry trees.

      - Akita Prefecture
      A bridal gown handed down at the Ando residence in Kakunodate, a place famous for its weeping cherries, recalls the thoughts of many a bride in its blossom designs.

      - Hokkaido
      The final destination of the cherry blossom front. The blossoms here are adored for marking the end of the bitterly cold winter.
      The 1,000-year old cherry tree

       

      Edited by kinwashi 23 May `16, 9:22PM
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