17 Dec, 04:08PM in sunny Singapore!
Home Taxi Drivers

Kinwashi Tour Japan Thread

Subscribe to Kinwashi Tour Japan Thread 9,976 posts

Please Login or Signup to reply.
  • kinwashi's Avatar
    10,941 posts since Jan '08
    • Okinawa Cherry blossom festivals 2016

      sakura_festivals_okinawa

      Japan’s first cherry blossoms appear in Yanbaru, the northern part of Okinawa, around the end of January. The trees are Kanhizakura (Cerasus cerasoides), which have bell-like petals in various shades of pink. You can enjoy colors from pale to rich, varying from tree to tree.

      Requiring cold temperatures to come into bloom, the pink blanket created by the trees moves slowly south from the northern mountains in one or two weeks. At this time of year, there will be many cherry blossom festivals taking place across the island, allowing you to enjoy Okinawan-style hanami (cherry blossom viewing). In mainland Japan, hanami usually means a picnic under the cherry trees, but here in Okinawa, you can take a stroll through the beautiful flowers. Wouldn’t you like to be the first to enjoy this year’s blossoms?

    • Sapporo
      (Hokkaido)
      2-May
      6-May

      Aomori
      (Aomori)
      23-Apr
      27-Apr

      Sendai
      (Miyagi)
      9-Apr
      14-Apr

      Tokyo
      (Tokyo)
      22-Mar
      30-Mar

      Niigata
      (Niigata)
      8-Apr
      13-Apr

      Kanazawa
      (Ishikawa)
      2-Apr
      8-Apr

      Nagoya
      (Aichi)
      22-Mar
      1-Apr

      Shizuoka
      (Shizuoka)
      20-Mar
      29-Mar

      Osaka
      (Osaka)
      26-Mar
      3-Apr

      Kyoto
      (Kyoto)
      25-Mar
      3-Apr

      Hiroshima
      (Hiroshima)
      24-Mar
      3-Apr

      Matsuyama
      (Ehime)
      22-Mar
      1-Apr

      Fukuoka
      (Fukuoka)
      19-Mar
      28-Mar

      Nagasaki
      (Nagasaki)
      21-Mar
      31-Mar

      Kagoshima
      (Kagoshima)
      22-Mar
      2-Apr

      Naha
      (Okinawa)
      9-Jan
      30-Jan

    • So the first and the last Perfecture you should know by now.

      So after Okinawa than up to Kagoshima the Kyushu island and up to the North Hokkaido.

       

       

    • The Sakura Forecast in Japan 2016: Where to Go and How to Plan

      Sep 21, 2015

      Sakura blossoms are a truly iconic aspect of Japanese nature and culture. The short time for which the petals bloom is a coveted sight in Japan and thousands of people flock to see this brief spectacle. Although the flowers may only last for a mere few days their beauty is second to none. It is therefore not surprising that many tourists wish to experience the sakura blossom too, myself included! However, this can prove more difficult than you might think. As the blossoms only do last for a few days there is a small window in each area when you can see them at full bloom. Also, due to the differing weather patterns every year, the trees will reach full bloom at a slightly different time.

      The Start of the Season

      sakura-petals

      So how can you plan to see sakura bloom when they are so fickle? Hedging your bets and studying the previous year’s date is a good place to start. If you like planning ahead, you are going to need to do some research. The start of the sakura season in each area is usually decided by a single tree which shows the beginning of the bloom in that area. The type of sakura tree that is used for this forecast is somei yoshino, the five-petaled flower.

      japanese-cherry-blossom

      So when you see a forecast or a report from a previous season, the full bloom dates will be when the nominated somei yoshino came to bloom. This is a good way to show the start of the season, although there are a variety of blossoms that do flower earlier. One stroke of luck is that there are also other blossom trees which flower later than the somei yoshino. This means that is you miss the full bloom of this variety, waiting a few days can mean that different sakura trees come to full bloom, for example, the Yaebeni Shidarezakura. This tree has more petals than the somei and is also much pinker in colour. These tend to bloom later so it gives you a chance to catch some blooms even if you have missed the true date of the full bloom.

      Sakura Forecast Dates for 2016

      sakura_front_800x450

      For 2016, the website Sakura Weathermap has begun its predictions for the cherry blossoms. Not only do they have the dates for when the trees will begin to bloom, they have sections for each main city in different regions of the country. These pages include the best dates to view the sakura as well!

      On the Sakura Weathermap website, the dates are only provided for the southern half of the country so far. The dates for some of Tohoku and Hokkaido have not yet been provided. But for those of you hoping to make a trip to Tokyo, Nagoya, Osaka, Fukuoka and all surrounding regions, you are in luck!

      In the Fukuoka area, blooming will begin around March 25th. The best time to view the blossoms will be from March 31st until April 8th.

      For Osaka, Kyoto and most of Kansai, the blooming begins a bit later, on March 29th. The best time to view these blossoms will be between April 4th and April 10th.

      As for Nagoya and Tokyo, the sakura will begin blooming on March 26th. The best viewing opportunities for these two cities will be April 2nd-9th and April 2nd-7th respectively.

      For exact blooming details for 2016, you can check this article which has dates for each region of the country. You’ll know exactly when the beautiful blooms will reach your city! There is also a list of places to visit in each region during the season.

      Different Areas

      early-sakura

      Going to different parts of Japan can change the full bloom date considerably. The sakura front, the line of blooming trees across the islands of Japan, begins in the most southern islands of Okinawa around January/February time. The front then moves up through the Japanese islands finally ending in Hokkaido in May. This gives you around three months to fit in your trip to see the blossoms. Of course, there may be a particular location where you want to see the trees in bloom, for example in Tokyo, Kyoto or around the Mount Fuji area. If you want a specific shot or to see them bloom in a specific location, for whatever reason, this narrows down the time you should visit. Of these three areas, Kyoto gets the blossoms first as it is further south than Tokyo. One of the earlier locations to get full bloom in Kyoto is the iconic Kiyomizu-dera complex, so arrive early if you want a snap here. The blossom in Kyoto can last until the middle of April if you want to see the later blooming varieties at Heian Shrine.

      Mount Fuji and Kawaguchi Lake, with cherry blossom branch

      For Tokyo, the tree which starts the season is at Yasukuni shrine. The blossoms here usually begin at the start of April, or in earlier years at the end of March. For earlier varieties try Koishikawa Korakuen. For a later season visit Koganei Park and see the Shirayuki which tend to bloom later. Many people wish to see the blooms against the backdrop of Mount Fuji. Here the season starts later than both Kyoto and Tokyo due to the altitude and mountainous location, this is usually around one week after full bloom in Tokyo. Again there are different places around the area to see the blossoms, for example Chureito Pagoda is usually in full bloom before the trees on Kawaguchi lake, due to the altitude and also the type of trees that are there.

      How to Have the Best Hanami

      sakura hanami

      Normally, no matter what part of the country you are in if you plan to go to a park or other area that is famous for sakura, it’s best to plan ahead if you hope to make a day of it.

      Arrive early if you want to get a spot under the trees with your family or friends, otherwise, you spend a lot more time walking than you may have wanted to. You may also end up choosing a spot that’s much further from the cherry blossoms than you hoped. You also want to make sure that you are allowed to sit in the spot you have chosen! If you don’t find any people, there may be a reason why.

      If you are hoping to have a very Japanese-style hanami, there are some essentials every blossom viewer needs to bring! First, you’ll need something for you and your group to sit on, so be sure to bring a picnic sheet. You can normally find these at any convenience store during the hanami season. Also, if you want to have a hanami picnic, as most people do, you’ll have to buy your food, drinks and utensils beforehand and make sure to have something you can easily bring them in.

      Not all places have trash cans either, although some do during the popular visiting seasons, so be sure to bring a bag to keep trash just in case!

      Early spring can still be a bit cold in Japan, so it’s best to dress warmly if you will be outside for a large portion of the day. If you wear the right clothes, find a good spot and enjoy a delicious lunch with friends while taking a plethora of sakura pictures, you’ll have a great time!

      You can also check here for more do’s and don’ts of hanami.

      Events and Places to See Sakura

      Three excellent places to view an abundance of cherry blossoms are Tokyo’s Ueno Park, Kyoto’s famed Kiyomizudera and, of course, the area surrounding the legendary Mount Fuji.

      Ueno Park
      ueno park

      If you plan to visit Tokyo during the cherry blossom season, Ueno Park is a must-visit. The park boasts around 800 trees of sakura and right in the middle of the city! There are Yoshino cherry trees as well as over 50 other varieties of sakura. To make your hanami adventure more exciting, the park is lined with festive lanterns that illuminate the trees at night. There are also large numbers of food stalls where you can buy anything from chocolate covered bananas to takoyaki.

      Ueno Park can be extremely crowded, so if you want to sit with your friends on a mat under the trees, be sure to secure your spot early. Don’t be discouraged if you’re on a budget, either, as entrance to the park is free. Ueno Park will have this event from the end of March until early April, so go while you can!

      Access

      Yoyogi Park
      sakura yoyogi koen

      Yoyogi Park, or Yoyogi Koen is a lovely spot that is right around the corner from Harajuku station or easily accessible on foot from Shibuya. It is home to the famous Meiji Jingu Shrine as well as being a wonderful spot for sakura.

      The park hosts plenty of events throughout the year and so it should be simple enough to find a spot to see the flowers as the park is full of vast greenery and is used to visitors.

      If you get bored of hanami (although, how would anyone get bored of all the sakura splendor?) you can also spend time in the park’s bird sanctuary.

      Another advantage to Yoyogi Park is that it is free to enter and open 24 hours!

      Access

      Shinjuku Gyoen
      sakura shinjuku gyoen

      Shinjuku Gyoen is a beautiful place to visit in any season. Its trees, grass, and flowers are some of the most breathtaking in Tokyo – and it’s right in the middle of the city!

      The park has 65 types of cherry blossoms blooming on over 1300 trees! As there are so many varieties, the blooming times are slightly different, meaning you will be able to enjoy the sakura there for a longer period of time. The yoshino sakura bloom earlier while toward the end of the season you can see several kinds of yaezakura.

      Access

      Kiyomizu-dera
      SONY DSC

      We know that temple is an extremely popular tourist spot in Kyoto. The scenery surrounding it is absolutely beautiful in any season, but the spring is spectacular. Kiyomizu-dera has over 1500 trees in bloom during the height of the sakura season. Among these, both somei yoshino and yamazakura are included. If you want to see the magical illumination of the blossoms, the temple has special hours from 6 pm to 9 pm between March 28th and April 12th. Entrance fees are 300 yen for adults and 200 yen for children.

      Access

      Arashiyama
      sakura arashiyama

      Arashiyama is one of Japan’s most beautiful places. It rings with Japanese history and traditional and, of course, has a gorgeous landscape.

      When the cherry blossoms are in full bloom, the entire mountain looks pink because of the volume of sakura. Looking out over the river of Arashiyama is probably the most beautiful scene in the Kyoto area at any time of year, but the plethora of cherry blossoms make it even more magical!

      Access

      Daigo-ji
      sakura daigo-ji

      This temple recently took first place as the most popular place for hanami in the entire country! The word “daigo” is used to mean something along the lines of “the finest in the world” in English. Needless to say, you can expect that of the sakura blooming here.

      In addition to the gorgeous flowers, the temple itself has a long history as well as several buildings that have been beautifully constructed. Several of the buildings on the temple grounds are National Treasures of Japan such as the five-story pagoda which was built all the way back in 951.

      Daigo-ji is a fantastic historical spot to spend a day among the sakura.

      Access

      Mount Fuji
      SONY DSC

      What could be better than a nice walk along a trail leading from a beautiful park to the shores of a lake with a view of sakura and Mount Fuji? The view from Lake Kawaguchi is like nothing else. The blossoms, the lake, and the mountain are all breathtaking. There is even a festival held in the area (normally in mid April) celebrating cherry blossoms.

      fujcherryblossom

      However, Lake Kawaguchi is not the only place with beautiful views of sakura and Fuji. You may choose any number of parks to go to including Arakurayama Sengen Park in Yamanashi (pictured) and Onshi Hakone Park in Kanagawa. Both places offer gorgeous views of the trees and the mountain.

      Additionally you can check Tokyo Cherry Blossom Tour options or Kyoto Cherry Blossom Tour options too if you really want to make the most of your trip to Japan during the cherry blossom season!

      Be Flexible!

      As you can see there is a lot of variation as to when the blooms will start. Therefore, if you are planning a trip solely to see the blossoms is might be best, if you are booking far in advance, to give yourself around a week in your chosen location to take into account yearly variations. Although knowing where earlier and later blooming varieties are can really help get you that shot. One thing that will greatly increase your chances is being flexible. For example, if you have planned to be in one location for a few days and the trees aren’t yet at full bloom simply wait longer than you planned for the trees to come into their own. I have booked my trip for the sakura season 2016 after much research on different tree types and the patterns from the past few years. Wish me luck!

    • So now you know Sakura blooming time is all perdiction and just forecast.

      It all depend on your luck if you are there.

      you see lt you are lucky,

      nobody will tell you even experts bloom at the right timing.

      But this year very difficult cause of the weather windy hot and cold not at the same time.

      So Sakura blooming not at the right time.

      Like the below i took from Kagoshima stated March but still not blooming.

       

      Edited by kinwashi 26 May `16, 9:11PM
    • Come back from Japan.

      So you had see and saw Sakura over in Japan.

      If show you this  below you tell me is this Sakura Flowers?

       

    • sourcePeach Blossom

      Edited by kinwashi 28 May `16, 8:05PM
    • And this below picture i took from Kagoshima.

      are they not the same?

       

    • Sakura again are this Sakura?

      Plum Blossom (43)

    • This got nothing to do with Cherry Blossom Sakura which we are talking.

       

      cherries

       

      Now is the right time to go to Japan you can enjoy with all this fruits its season now.

      So this is another kind of Cherry Blossom from Japan.

       

      This kind of fruits not came from the below picture 

      Edited by kinwashi 28 May `16, 9:56PM
  • Cloffers57's Avatar
    1 post since May '16
  • Bmax25's Avatar
    18 posts since Oct '11
  • kinwashi's Avatar
    10,941 posts since Jan '08
    • From my hotel Chuo Station to this place.

       

      【 Kotsuki Riverside 】
      Scale : Approx 500 trees
      Normal blooming season : Late March~ Early April

      cherry_blossom_viewing_kotsukiriverside.jpg

      Access : Approx. 20 minutes from Kagoshima-chuou station by walk. 
    • That moment when i went there to explore whether any sight of Sakura blooms.

      Over here at Kotsuki Riverside.

      Immediately  upon reaching saw a  Big  Explosion erupted fro Sakurajima.

      And with my camera ready at anytime.

      Wow... so Lucky and took this photo at the right time.

       

      Edited by kinwashi 30 May `16, 8:14PM
  • Dataman's Avatar
    4 posts since Jun '16
  • kinwashi's Avatar
    10,941 posts since Jan '08
    • Interest in travel to Japan increases, with 37 per cent rise from Singapore

      People walk down a shopping street in the Shinjuku district in Tokyo, Japan on April 19. People walk down a shopping street in the Shinjuku district in Tokyo, Japan on April 19. PHOTO: REUTERS
      PUBLISHED
      JUN 3, 2016, 2:18 PM SGT
      UPDATED
      JUN 3, 2016, 4:21 PM

      SINGAPORE -Interest in Japan as a travel destination has risen 15 per cent in the last year, with Singapore making the second biggest increase behind China, according to a study by travel site TripAdvisor.

      The study, which measured markets showing the greatest year-on-year rise in travel interest to Japan based on traffic sessions on its site, found China to be Japan's top inbound source with increased interest of 130 per cent, followed by Singapore with a rise of 37 per cent and Indonesia with an increase of 30 per cent, TripAdvisor said in a release on Friday (June 3).

      The study also showed that there is a growing appetite for off-the-beaten-path destinations in Japan, as the top three cities with higher international interest were Kanazawa on Honshu island, Ishigaki in the Okinawa Prefecture, and Takayama, located in a mountainous area in central Japan.

      Cultural attractions were the main appeal for those researching things to do in Kanazawa, while Ishigaki was mostly researched for its outdoor offerings and Takayama for its sights and landmarks.

      Of the top 10 Japanese cities that have seen the biggest increase in traveller interest, Takayama received the highest ratings across all business categories on TripAdvisor, including eatery (4.32 out of 5), accommodation (4.18 out of 5), and attraction (4.23 out of 5).

      A record number of 19.73 million people visited Japan in 2015, according to the Japan National Tourism Organization, marking a 47 per cent increase from 2014. Chinese travellers accounted for a quarter of the total inbound arrivals to the country last year.

      "The latest TripAdvisor inbound study for Japan not only reaffirms China's significance as a major source of inbound tourism for Japan, but also suggests that inbound travel is being driven by the country's diverse tourism offerings across different regions," said TripAdvisor APAC's director of partnerships Aaron Hung

    • Most of the Pink flowers over in Japan.

      Not all  are Sakura.

      Like this kind of pink colour flower look similar to Sakura it bear fruit.

      About Okayama’s white peach

      Okayama’s peaches are well-known among the Japanese for the folk tale of “Momotarou (Peach Boy)”, and peach blossoms represent Okayama as the “Prefectural Flower”.
      Full-scale peach cultivation began in 1875 (Meiji Period), when peaches were brought to Okayama from China. With the gifted environmental features and the long hard work of the foregoers who acquired brilliant techniques, Okayama became one of Japan’s largest peach producers.

      “White peaches” are grown with extra care; each fruit is covered with a small bag to protect the delicate soft white skin to ripen it to perfection. This process requires a lot of work, and is an important technique in cultivating the finest peaches. Comments like “I’ve never had peaches that are this soft and sweet.” and “Peaches made in Okayama are always delicious!” are the finest compliments for the peach producers in Okayama.

      Variety of white peaches

      tate_image_sui.jpg

      There are a variety of white peaches; the ripening season and flavor differs according to each variety.
      Among the wide varieties, the “Shimizu White Peach” is one of the most famous peaches produced in Okayama. Once you taste its splendid flavor and juice, you can never forget it.

      The “Okayama Yume Hakuto” is rather large and is very sweet. It is a special, new variety that can only be produced in Okayama.

      Okayama has other tasty white peaches. These magnificent peaches are made in Okayama, not only because of the gifted environment, but also because the producers have always worked very hard and taken good care of the peaches.

      What other varieties of white peaches does Okayama have?

      Of course, there’s more! Peaches are in season from June to September, which are referred to according to five different stages; very early harvest, early harvest, mid-season, late ripening and very late ripening.

      campaign_kage.png

      Hanayome

       

      【Hanayome】

      Hanayome are small and very sweet. They ripen during the very early harvest stage, so we get to enjoy good peaches without waiting till summer.
      With its beautiful reddish appearance it has fulfilled many peach lovers who just can’t wait until summer.

      Hanayome are in season from late June till early July.

      campaign_kage.png

      Hakuhou

       

      【Hakuhou】

      Hakuhou and Shimizu White Peach are the two most famous varieties. Many Hakuhou-lovers are dazzled with the soft texture, plentiful juice and rich sweetness.
      OKAYAMA made Hakuhou especially have a high reputation with superb quality, rich sweetness and a refreshing aftertaste.

      Hakuhou are in season from mid-July till late July.

      campaign_kage.png

      Shimizu White Peach

      【Shimizu White Peach】

      Shimizu White Peach, which is the most famous variety, has a graceful color of pinkish milky white.It can be referred to as the ‘Queen of Peaches’, for it has a splendid blend of soft texture, juice and sweet fragrance.Many people anxiously wait for the Shimizu White Peach to be in the markets, and they are also popular to be sent as gifts as well.

      Shimizu White Peach are in season from late July till mid-August.

      campaign_kage.png

      OKAYAMA Yume Hakutou

      【OKAYAMA Yume Hakutou】

      It is a new variety which was given the name OKAYAMA Yume Hakutou, meaning Okayama’s dream.This peach is a large white peach with delicate flavor and clear sweetness.
      Recently many people choose this type for it is a rather large variety; an average of 350g to 400g, and sometimes you can even find ones that are 500g!

      OKAYAMA Yume Hakutou are in season in mid-August.

      campaign_kage.png

      Hakurei

      【Hakurei】

      This is a beautifully white, ‘white peach’.
      It will soon become one of the big names, with its soft texture, marvelous sweetness, rich juice and fragrance.
      It is a popular gift because of its splendid flavor and appearance, but the season is very short, so don’t miss it!

      Hakurei are in season from early August till mid-August.

      campaign_kage.png

      Golden Peach

      【Golden Peach】

      Although it is not a white peach, this variety has become very popular recently.Some say that the golden colored fruit which has rich sweetness and slight sourness is similar to mango.
      Of course you can enjoy it fresh, but there are also popular recipes such as jam or cake and cookie fillings. They are about 300g so they are rather large.

      Golden Peach are in season from mid-August till mid-September.

      campaign_kage.png

      How to enjoy peaches

      White peach of very delicious Okayama.If you cannot find any green colors on the stem of the peach, that means your peach is fully ripen. You should enjoy it right away. If you leave it in the refrigerator to cool for two hours before you eat it, you can enjoy it even better!
      But be careful not to cool it too much. If you leave it in the refrigerator too long, you won’t be able to fully enjoy the flavor or sweetness. So if you can’t eat it right away, leave it in room temperature, but try to eat it as soon as possible. Avoid leaving it in the refrigerator too long, or under direct sunlight for the peach may rot.
      The best way to enjoy peaches are eating them fresh, but if you have more than enough peaches, try making some fresh peach jam. Cook it in an enamel pot, with half the amount of granulated sugar of the peaches.
      You can enjoy the jam along with some yogurt, or mix it with milk to make a refreshing drink!

      momoflo2.png

      p_1.png

      OKAYAMA FRUITS Information Site.Top page

      About Okayama and fruits

      About Okayama’s white peach

      About Okayama’s grapes

      More facts about OKAYAMA FRUIT

      A wide variety of OKAYAMA FRUIT

      campaign_kage2.png

      slide_s_b.png
      Here’s a slide show to give you
      a better image of high quality fruits
      from OKAYAMA.
      BAR.psd
      Check out the latest information on Facebook.
      okayama_en_20040.jpg
      The sunny land OKAYAMA
      japan_link.png

      pri.png
      maps.png

    • 10 Japanese Foods That Are Not Sushi

      by Richard Mulvihill

      Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterest
      Yakiniku sizzling on a table top barbecue.

      Yakiniku sizzling on a table top barbecue.

      The Meat Lovers Guide To Japan.

      You want to go to Japan, perhaps for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. But you have one major worry; You don’t like fish. You are a meat eater and you’ve been one your whole life. And if you don’t like fish, I’ll assume that eating sushi scares the bejezus out of you. If raw fish scares the bejezus out of you, then the conversation about sea urchin, eel and things with tentacles has probably not come up.

      This never seems to be addressed in the top 10 travel tips for Japan. I don’t want people to miss out on one of the most awesome countries in the world because of a lack of fish fondness. So I’m here to say; FEAR NOT MEAT LOVING WORLD TRAVELERS.

      Contrary to popular belief, the Japanese do not eat sushi for breakfast lunch and dinner. Keep in mind that sushi is an expensive delicacy in Japan just like it is in America. They don’t eat it everyday. The rest of those days they eat “other” foods. Which leads me to let you in on one of Japans best kept secrets;  Meat.

      Meat dishes in Japan are dealt with the same meticulous attention to detail that sushi gets. There is a wide variety of super delicious meat choices that come as a shock to most tourist who assume that they would be eating fish for 2 weeks.

      This is not a mysterious “Japan through the back door” guide. A list of secret places where you could eat meat and not get caught. Meat is not a secret to the Japanese. In Japan, places that serve meat are in fact just called “Restaurants”. Most of the dishes listed below can be found on any given street in any given city in Japan. You could easily make your way across japan without ever having to eat sushi.

       

      Yakiniku

      Yakiniku literally translates to “grilled meat”, so I can’t think of a better place to start. In fact, you should start getting familiar with the word “Yaki” (grilled) because it pops up in sorts of delicious Japanese menu items. It is also a good indicator that whatever you’re eating is not raw.
      If you ever wanted to get a chair, pull it up to your barbecue, and just start eating right off the grill, then Yakiniku is your dream come true. You sit at a table that has a grill built into it. After you are brought a plate of all sorts of meat, you put what you want on the grill and eat it. All different cuts of beef, plus pork and chicken, are at your disposal. This is literally the meat lovers special.

       

      Yakitori

      Yakitori (grilled chicken) is the chicken lovers special. This one is left to the experts to cook. A chef takes small cuts of chicken and grilles them on skewers over charcoal. He dips them in to this magic bucket filled with the family owned secret sauce and then he puts them back on the grill. They are then served to you with cold beer. The results are the most awesome chicken you have ever had. They mix it up by combining different parts of the chicken; thigh, wings, skin and liver. There are even chicken meatballs. But just about everything gets dunked in the magic sauce and grilled.

       

      Gyudon

      Gyudon (literally – beef bowl) is a bowl of rice topped with thin cuts of flavored beef that have been grilled with onions. You have the option of spicing it up with a combination of red pepper or picked ginger which gives it a great kick. You’ll be able to identify the ginger by its obscene glowing red color. Its grilled beef and onion done Japanese style.

       

      Hambagu

      This strange word is good ole “Hamburger” after it has been forced to go through the Japanese foreign-word de-construction system. Regardless of what they call it, it is still Hamburger. But it is Hamburger with a unique take. In classic Japanese minimalistic fashion that have gotten rid of the bun, the cheese, the lettuce and tomato. Even the mustard, ketchup, and pickle. They just focus on the burger.
      You take ground beef and mix it with onion and other seasoning just like a regular hamburger. But then they take the patty and cook it with a type of red wine/tonkatsu/meat sauce that they pour all over the top when its done. Or even better they sometimes pour it over the top while its cooking. Thats it. The burger is so delicious that you eat it by itself and it’s soft that you can eat it with chopsticks.

       

      Shabu-Shabu

      This is another simple and to the point meat dish. There is a pot of boiling water on your table at the restaurant and you cook everything yourself. You get a huge plate of beef that is cut wafer thin and then put a piece into boiling water (it cooks very fast).  You then dip it in your choice of several sauces and eat it.
      So the formula is;  Dip meat in water + Dip meat in sauce + Eat meat. Repeat until you are no longer hungry.

       

      Okonomiyaki

      This is another food that has the cook it yourself in the restaurant arrangement. Okonomiyaki takes a little more effort than grilling meat on your table-top grill. In this case you also make a pancake like batter with several ingredients that you are given. Then you toss that onto the meat that you grilled. Usually bacon like strips of pork. You cook everything together in a pizza-pancake like extravaganza. Top it off with some special sauce and mayonnaise. You can cut it up and eat it right off the grill. This is one of my all time favorite underrated Japanese foods.

      Gyoza

      gyoza

      Gyoza is kind of a fried dumpling with a mixed pork and onion filling inside. They usually fry them all together by putting several in a row in the grill. When they are served to you, you get a whole 8 pack that have been connected at the bottom like KitKats.
      I actually went to a Gyoza “Museum” in Tokyo. Which is like going to a shopping mall that only has restaurants, and they only serve gyoza. You are handed this stamp book to fill out, like homework on a grade school field trip. Then, you go collecting all the stamps by eating all the different types of gyoza in the shopping mall. it was the most awesome field trip I have ever been on.

       

      Karage

      Karage is Japanese fried chicken. It does not have the serious exoskeleton that you crunch through in American fried chicken. The oil is lighter and the flour made crunchiness is lighter, yet it has strong flavor and is less salty than the American version. Karage always seems to be juicy as well. Another great combo with cold beer.

       

      Tonkatsu

      Tonkastu is a breaded and deep fried pork cutlet. It is usually cut into mathematically accurate slices for you to eat easier. It comes with a dark brown sauce that makes and excellent paring. The great thing about Tonkatsu is the variety of ways you can eat it. You can eat the cutlet and its sliced wedges by themselves or on a bowl of rice with an a egg tossed on the top. Or the super popular Katsu Curry. Where you toss it onto a plate of spicy curry.

       

      Ramen

      Ramen is a noodle dish and seems out of place in the meat lovers guide, but I have put it in for two fabulous reasons.
      One is Tonkotsu Ramen, Not to be confused with Tonkatsu (above). The “ton” in both means pig/pork, but kotsu means bone and katsu means cutlet. So tonkotsu is a pork bone based ramen that I think it is the tastiest of all the ramen flavors.
      And two, Chashu.
      Chashu is another glorious invention that the Japanese have put their touch on. Chashu is when you take pork, roll it into a tight log, and slow cook it for like a million hours. The result is this soft tender bacon-smelling medley of meat and fat. Usually one or two slices are cut and tossed on top of your ramen. Most Ramen places have a dish called “Chashu Ramen”, where they cover the whole top of your ramen bowl with this delicious pork. In other words;  it’s the “meat lovers” version of ramen.
    • One more i like to introduce here is this.

      Very similar like what we are having during Chinese New Year one of the goodies.

       

      Momiji Manjyu

      Momiji Manjyu

      Momiji Manjyu

      Momiji Manjyu were first created about 100 years ago, in 1906.

      The female manager of the Ryokan (inn), Okami asked a Japanese pastry chef, who often had business dealings with her, to make something special for Miyajima. This is said to have been the beginning of Momiji Manjyu.

      There are many flavors like chocolate, custard, maccha, cheese, and also smooth red bean inside the maple shaped castella. We can taste freshly baked Momiji Manjyu in Miyajima.

      Origin:

      Another story of the origin of Momiji Manjyu is that when Hirobumi Ito visited Miyajima during the Meiji period, while looking at the charming hands of the girl working at a tea house, he said to her jokingly, “How tasty it would be if I could eat baked sweets shaped like maple leaves.”

      The female manager of the tea house was listening to him and made Momiji Manjyu from the scatterd maple leaves as her motif. Since then, more research has been done to improve the ingredients and the method. Now it has become a special sweet worthy of praise not only in Miyajima, but also in Hiroshima.

      There are about 20 manufacturers of Momiji Manjyu in Miyajima, and each have their own special characteristics. It is fun to taste different types of Momji Manjyu in Miyajima.  

    •  

      The below video 

      This is not Sakura.

      if is will be there i can tell the secret whether Sakura or Peach Blossom.

      will share this later.

       

      The secret.

      https://youtu.be/uqiEaJFUpag

    • Originally posted by kinwashi:

       

      The below video 

      This is not Sakura.

      if i will be there i can tell the secret whether Sakura or Peach Blossom.

      will share this later.

       

      The secret.

      https://youtu.be/uqiEaJFUpag

       

    • Plum trees versus cherry trees: how to tell the difference and identify them

      Posted on March 27, 2014 by vcbfblog in Cherry ScoutsPhotos
      blog_plum_tremblay_Plum&CherryTrees-20060324-009 blog_cherry_burnaby_tremblay_Cherrystreet2008

      At the end of March, when you see rows of pink trees, in Vancouver  don’t be too quick to yell “Cherry blossoms!” These trees might be plum trees – not cherry trees!  To find out, you’ll have to get closer.

      There are 12,000 plum blossoms in Vancouver.  Plum trees are beautiful, but since the Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival aims at celebrating the beauty of cherry blossoms – not plum blossoms – we prepared this guide to help you to know the difference between plum blossoms and cherry blossoms.

      The main characteristics of plum blossoms are:

      • fragrant (they smell good)
      • no split at the end of petals
      • dark trunk with no horizontal lines

      Check this out:

      blog_plum_tremblay_PlumBurnaby20070327-001 blog_cherry_tremblay_IMG_0236

      Smell of plum blossoms: Plum blossoms are very fragrant. At this distance, if your tree smells good and “flowery”, it’s probably a plum tree.

      Smell of cherry blossoms: The early cherry blossoms are not fragrant. They don’t smell good or “flowery”. Their smell is very faint (almost non-existent), except for some rare cultivars in mid-season that can be very fragrant.

      blog_plum_tremblay_IMG_3390 blog_cherry_tremblay_IMG_0218-chery-buds

      Petals of plum blossoms: Plum petals are oval. There is no split at the end of the petals.

      Petals of cherry blossoms: Cherry blossoms have a small split at the end of each petals.

       

      blog_plum_tremblay_IMG_6951 blog_cherry_tremblay_IMG_6848-lemcels-trunk

      Bark on plum trees: The bark of plum trees is dark and does not have horizontal bars.

      Bark on cherry trees: the bark of cherry trees is light gray and has horizontal lines called “Lenticels”.

       

      blog_plum_tremblay_IMG_3393 blog_cherry_tremblay_IMG_9684

       

      Buds of plum blossoms: The plum buds are round and there is only one blossom coming out of each bud. They stick straight out from the branches on a short thin stem.

      Buds of cherry blossoms: Cherry buds are oval. There are more than one blossom coming out of the bud (in this picture, six flowers are coming out of the bud.)

      blog_plum_tremblay_IMG_3321 blog_cherry_tremblay_SakraDaysVanDusn20110402-244

      Leaves of plum : If the leaves are purple, then it’s defnitely a plum tree.   Plums leaves come out with the flowers and unroll from a cigar shape.

      Leaves of cherry :The leaves of cherry trees are green (or copper) and, for the early cherries, come out usually after the flowers. Cherry leaves unfold like a bill-fold opening.

      blog_plum_tremblay_IMG_6949 blog_cherry_tremblay_IMG_8947

      Grafts: On plum trees, the grafts are placed on the branches. They grow vertically on the branches. These grafts will be more visible in early spring before the flowes bloom.

      Grafts:On cherry trees, the graft are placed on top of the trunk so the tree looks “stompy”.

      blog_plum_tremblay_IMG_3308 blog_cherry_halifax_tremblay_IMG_0079

      Shape of plum: mostly round or oval.

      Shape of cherry trees: umbrella shape (the branches are spreading, so the top is wide then the bottom).

       

      Whiteplum20090412byJT blog_20140326_vancityhall_accolade_tremblay_IMG_7648

      Color: plum blossoms can be pink (with purple leaves) or white (with green leaves)

      Color: cherry blossoms can be dark pink, light pink, white, yellowish. The leaves are copper or green and come out usually after the flowers.

      blog_plum_tremblay_PlumBurnaby20070327-003

      Plum characteristics: When all the plum blossoms are open, you can’t see the buds – and it’s hard to see the grafts – so you’ll have to rely on the plum blossoms main characteristics:

      • fragrant (smell “flowery”)
      • no split at the end of the petals
      • dark trunk (with no horizontal lines)
      blog_20140323_okame_charlesfell_tremblay_IMG_7400

      Cherry characteristics: There are over 54 varieties of cherry blossoms but they all share the same characteristics:

      • a split at the end of each petals
      • light-grey trunk has horizontal bars

       

      ***

      Think you got it? Take the test!

       Cherry or plum blossoms?

      plumblossomIMG_3386byJT

      Answer: plum.

      Purple leaves and no split at the end of the petals.

      ***

      Plum blossoms

      Answer: plum.

      No split at the end of petals. One flower coming out of the bud. Smells “flowery”.

      ***

      YoshinoHandfromMikebyMY

      Answer: cherry.

      Split at the end of the petals.

      ***

       

      Akebono cherry blossom at Burrard skytrain station.

      Answer: cherry.

      Horizontal lines on the bark.

      ***

       

       

      You might also like:

      Cherry versus plum blossoms: What’s the difference (March 28, 2013)

      ***

      To learn how to identify 54 varietie of cherry blossoms, buy Ornamental Cherries in Vancouver, by Douglas Justice. Happy cherry blossom viewing!

    • Beyond sakura: How to tell a cherry blossom from a plum or peach flower

      By Casey Baseel, RocketNews24

      LIFESTYLE APR. 15, 2016 - 06:06AM JST ( 2 )

      Beyond sakura: How to tell a cherry blossom from a plum or peach flowerPlum (left), peach (center), and cherry (right)

      TOKYO —

      Cherry blossoms are pretty easy to distinguish, aren’t they? Should you find yourself in a Japanese garden and see a tree covered in flowers with five petals and a pink color, those must be the fabled sakura right?

      Well, not necessarily. See, Japan actually has multiple types of flowers that fit that description: cherry, plum, and peach blossoms. What’s more, even though their blossoming peaks come at different times, there’s a bit of overlap between when they can be seen in bloom. Plum blossoms come first (opening in mid-February), followed by peaches (mid-March) and then sakura (late March), but an unusually warm couple of days or sudden cold snap can shift their blooming patterns. As a result, sometimes it can be hard to tell which of the three flowers you’re looking at just based on the date.

      That said, there are a couple of telltale characteristics that distinguish each of the three blossoms from the other two, and Twitter user @TECHNOuchi recently pointed out some of the easiest to spot.

      The simplest method is to examine the shape of the individual petals. Plum blossom petals are evenly rounded, whereas peach petals are teardrop-shaped. Sakura, befitting their status as Japan’s favorite flower, have a cleft at the tip that gives them an elegant air (or makes them look like a female Pikachu).

      However, the literally organic form of flower petals means that sometimes plum petals aren’t perfect circles, nor are the clefts on cherry blossoms always as sharply pronounced as in the above illustration. In that case, the next thing to look for is how the flowers are attached to the branch of the tree.

      Plum blossoms develop individually and have no stem, instead growing straight out from the branch. Peach blossoms have short stems, with two flowers sprouting from roughly the same position on the bough. Finally, cherry blossoms have the longest stems, with multiple-flower clusters all originating at the same point along the branch, which provides a concrete reason for why their blooming has such a dramatic aura.

      Finally, the color of the petals can also be a clue as to the flower’s identity. In general, only plum blossoms can bloom in an almost crimson shade of purple. The most extreme examples are more pronounced, so seeing a dark color tells you right away that the flower is a plum blossom, but things get trickier with white or pink flowers. Both plum and cherry blossoms can be white, and all three types of flowers can be pink, so really all the color test can tell you for sure is that if it’s purple, it’s a plum, and if it’s not pink, then it isn’t a peach blossom.

      Still, with three different methods to tell the three types of flowers apart, we think you’ll be all set for your spring flower viewing.

      Source: Hamster Sokuho

      Read more stories from RocketNews24.
      Apparently cats enjoy cherry blossoms as much as we do 
      Fallen cherry blossoms make gorgeous “sakura carpet” at Hirosaki Park 
      Sad news: 1,266 famous Tokyo plum trees get the axe to prevent spread of “plum pox”

    • Beyond sakura: How to tell a cherry blossom from a plum or peach flower

      FD 0

      Not every pink flower in Japan is a cherry blossom.

       

      Cherry blossoms are pretty easy to distinguish, aren’t they? Should you find yourself in a Japanese garden and see a tree covered in flowers with five petals and a pink color, those must be the fabled sakura right?

      Well, not necessarily. See, Japan actually has multiple types of flowers that fit that description: cherry, plum, and peach blossoms. What’s more, even though their blossoming peaks come at different times, there’s a bit of overlap between when they can be seen in bloom. Plum blossoms come first (opening in mid-February), followed by peaches (mid-March) and then sakura (late March), but an unusually warm couple of days or sudden cold snap can shift their blooming patterns. As a result, sometimes it can be hard to tell which of the three flowers you’re looking at just based on the date.

      That said, there are a couple of telltale characteristics that distinguish each of the three blossoms from the other two, and Twitter user @TECHNOuchi recently pointed out some of the easiest to spot.

      The simplest method is to examine the shape of the individual petals. Plum blossom petals are evenly rounded, whereas peach petals are teardrop-shaped. Sakura, befitting their status as Japan’s favorite flower, have a cleft at the tip that gives them an elegant air (or makes them look like a female Pikachu).

      ▼ Plum (left), peach (center), and cherry (right)

      FD 1

      However, the literally organic form of flower petals means that sometimes plum petals aren’t perfect circles, nor are the clefts on cherry blossoms always as sharply pronounced as in the above illustration. In that case, the next thing to look for is how the flowers are attached to the branch of the tree.

      Plum blossoms develop individually and have no stem, instead growing straight out from the branch. Peach blossoms have short stems, with two flowers sprouting from roughly the same position on the bough. Finally, cherry blossoms have the longest stems, with multiple-flower clusters all originating at the same point along the branch, which provides a concrete reason for why their blooming has such a dramatic aura.

      ▼ Once again, plum (left), peach (center), and cherry (right)

      FD 2

      Finally, the color of the petals can also be a clue as to the flower’s identity.

      FD 3

      In general, only plum blossoms, shown in the center of the above photo, can bloom in an almost crimson shade of purple. The most extreme examples are more pronounced than the one seen in the photo, so seeing a dark color tells you right away that the flower is a plum blossom, but things get trickier with white or pink flowers. Both plum and cherry blossoms can be white, and all three types of flowers can be pink, so really all the color test can tell you for sure is that if it’s purple, it’s a plum, and if it’s not pink, then it isn’t a peach blossom.

      Still, with three different methods to tell the three types of flowers apart, we think you’ll be all set for your spring flower viewing.

      Source: Hamster Sokuho
      Images: Twitter/@TECHNOuchi

Please Login or Signup to reply.