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GE2015 Results

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  • minx's Avatar
    810 posts since Sep '15
    • www.tremeritus.com/2015/09/14/elderly-singaporean-voted-pap-for-ft-rental-income/

      That is pure selfishness.

  • jurongresident's Avatar
    796 posts since Jul '09
    • Actually, for the benefit of the long-term, of the very long-term,

      It may affect every one using the Singapore currency, at least in the short-term.

      But I think there are really benefits, in the long-term, the very long-term.

      Suggestion:

      every country in ASEAN should set their currency at the same exchange rate.

      In the beginning, the neighbouring countries will benefit. Singapore will not really benefit.

      Except, more foreign investors would invest here in Singapore, because it would cost less to do so. :)

      Think about it. If the neighbouring countries are all developed countries and first-world countries, Singapore can be part of it, and benefit from it. :)

      Edited by jurongresident 14 Sep `15, 10:37PM
  • minx's Avatar
    810 posts since Sep '15
    •  

      Singapore leader praises youth for huge electoral win

      Associated PressBy ANNABELLE LIANG | Associated Press – Sat, Sep 12, 2015

      RELATED CONTENT

      • Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong of the ruling People's Action Party celebrate a win in his constituency in Singapore, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2015. The party that has ruled Singapore since it became a country a half-century ago appeared poised to stay in power for five more years as the city-state's citizens voted Friday in a compulsory election. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)View Photo

        Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong of the ruling People's Action …

      • Supporters of the ruling People's Action Party celebrate as they listen to results from various constituencies in Singapore, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2015. The party that has ruled Singapore since it became a country a half-century ago appeared poised to stay in power for five more years as the city-state's citizens voted Friday in a compulsory election. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)View Photo

        Supporters of the ruling People's Action Party celebrate as they listen to results …

      • A supporter of the ruling People's Action Party takes a photograph as he waits to hear from Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong in Singapore, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2015. The party that has ruled Singapore since it became a country a half-century ago appeared poised to stay in power for five more years as the city-state's citizens voted Friday in a compulsory election. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)View Photo

        A supporter of the ruling People's Action Party takes a photograph as he waits …

      • Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong of the ruling People's Action Party celebrates a win in his constituency in Singapore, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2015. The party that has ruled Singapore since it became a country a half-century ago appeared poised to stay in power for five more years as the city-state's citizens voted Friday in a compulsory election. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)View Photo

        Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong of the ruling People's Action …

      • Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, third from left on stage leads his colleagues of the ruling People's Action Party as they celebrate a win in their constituency in Singapore, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2015. The party that has ruled Singapore since it became a country a half-century ago appeared poised to stay in power for five more years as the city-state's citizens voted Friday in a compulsory election. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)View Photo

        Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, third from left on stage leads his …

      • Supporters of the Worker's Party cheer as they wait for results at an assembly center in Singapore, Friday, Sept. 11, 2015. Singaporeans voted Friday in general elections whose results hold no surprises - the ruling People's Action Party will extend its 50-year-rule by another five years. But what will be closely watched is the percentage of votes it garners, which will determine the measure of its popularity as the city-state goes through tough economic times. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)View Photo

        Supporters of the Worker's Party cheer as they wait for results at an assembly …

      • Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong of the ruling People's Action Party celebrates a win in his constituency in Singapore, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2015. The party that has ruled Singapore since it became a country a half-century ago appeared poised to stay in power for five more years as the city-state's citizens voted Friday in a compulsory election. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)View Photo

        Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong of the ruling People's Action …

      • Supporters of the Worker's Party cheer as they wait for results at coffee shop in Singapore, Friday, Sept. 11, 2015. Singaporeans voted Friday in general elections whose results hold no surprises - the ruling People's Action Party will extend its 50-year-rule by another five years. But what will be closely watched is the percentage of votes it garners, which will determine the measure of its popularity as the city-state goes through tough economic times. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)View Photo

        Supporters of the Worker's Party cheer as they wait for results at coffee shop …

      SINGAPORE (AP) — Singapore's prime minister on Saturday lauded the city-state's youth vote for helping return his party to power in a massive election victory, and reversing a worrying drop in popularity it suffered in the last polls four years ago.

      The ruling People's Action Party got 83 of the 89 seats in Parliament, while the opposition Workers' Party captured six in Friday's elections.

      "It is a good result for the PAP, but it is an excellent result for Singapore," Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said in the early hours of Saturday, after final results were announced. He said the result would not have been possible without broad support from all sections of society.

      "And in particular, it could not have been done without strong support from the young ... it shows that the young people understand what is at stake, support what we are doing, really to secure a bright future for Singapore," he said.

      The victory of the People's Action Party was never in doubt — it has won every election since independence in 1965 — but what was notable was the percentage of votes it secured: nearly 70 percent of all votes cast, compared to 60 percent in the 2011 elections.

      A day after the election, candidates of various political parties were up early to thank residents through walkabouts and victory parades in open-top vehicles. 

      The huge sweep means the struggling opposition made no headway despite highlighting problems like income disparity, restrictions on free speech, overcrowding caused by immigration, infrequent breakdown in public transportation and the rising cost of living. The PAP had campaigned on the theme that voting for the opposition would produce a second-rate government and squander the economic gains achieved during the last 50 years.

      The message resonated with voters and perhaps even scared the fence-sitters into going back to a tried and trusted party, resulting in the stronger mandate for the PAP.

      "What I can say is that this is not ... a mandate for the PAP's economic policies," said Kenneth Jeyaretnam, secretary-general of the Reform Party, which did not win any seats.

      "All this is a mandate for authoritarianism and brainwashing. It shows what you do when you control everybody's housing, you control their savings, you control their jobs because you're the major employer, you control all the media," he said.

      The timing of the election also made a difference — it was called right after Singapore's 50th birthday celebrations on Aug. 9 while nationalist feelings were still high, and months after the March 23 death of Singapore's founding leader, Lee Kuan Yew, the father of Prime Minister Lee.

      The senior Lee became the country's first prime minister in 1965 and remained in office until 1990, a period of rapid development and prosperity. His son has been prime minister since 2004.

      ___

      Associated Press writer Vijay Joshi in Bangkok contributed to this report.

    • the youthie who voted pay and pay still have not tasted bitterness, buay chai see.

       

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    260,620 posts since Dec '99
  • minx's Avatar
    810 posts since Sep '15
    • Originally posted by FireIce:

      how they know is the youth?

      you forget, Election Dept under lee Hsien Loong.

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    260,620 posts since Dec '99
  • minx's Avatar
    810 posts since Sep '15
    • Originally posted by FireIce:

      REACH OUT TO THOSE WHO DIDN'T SUPPORT PAP http://ebx.sh/1MlUiTo 

      na na na poot poot

      icon_lol.gif

    •  

      INGAPOREANS HAVE LOST SO MUCH BUT STILL BLINDLY IGNORANT ABOUT IT

      Submitted by farhan on Wed, 16/09/2015 - 4:24pm

      <Facebook post by Alex Tan>

      Who are the winners of GE2015? PAP.

       

      Advertisement

      Losers? Sorry not the Opposition and definitely not the media like myself States Times Review. It is Singaporeans.

      So what did Singaporeans lose? Singaporeans lost both important things that they don't care about and important things they care about.
      Important things they don't care about? Democracy, freedom of speech and the Constitution.

      Important things they care about? Retirement. Employment. Livability. Quality of life. Family time. Affordability. Economy. Check and balance.

      Singaporeans lost so much yet they can tell you they are fortunate at least the Opposition is not voted in because they have taken in lies telling them that the enemy is the Opposition and it is the Opposition who are responsible for the landslide PAP win and also the Opposition why PAP policies did not went well.

      Blaming the Opposition is such a convenient excuse because it cuts brain activities. What policies? Who cares about policies isn't it?

      I find Singapore's level of ignorance at a dangerous low because we do not have an independent and neutral media that promotes critical analysis. I have always maintained that people who read States Times Review require a level of sophistication, otherwise, my articles are really not for you.

      - See more at: http://www.allsingaporestuff.com/article/singaporeans-have-lost-so-much-still-blindly-ignorant-about-it#sthash.Cph5K1Vl.dpuf

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    260,620 posts since Dec '99
  • Honeybunz's Avatar
    15,890 posts since Apr '02
    • Originally posted by FireIce:

      how they know is the youth?

      they sneak into the vault in the middle of the night to check the ballot tix one by one.  

      ohhhh die ohhh die.  who vote for that who? 

  • The Code's Avatar
    440 posts since Jul '14
    •  

      IPS releases survey findings on GE2015

       

      Less desire for political diversity

       

      The desire for greater political diversity dropped sharply in the recent General Election (GE) compared to the previous one, according to a survey by Institute of Policy Studies (IPS).

      The vote swing of 9.8 percentage points to the People's Action Party (PAP) in the Sept 11 GE (it won nearly 70 per cent of the vote) was likely due to middle- and higher-income earners backing the political status quo.

         GE2011 saw the PAP's share of the popular vote fall from 66.6 per cent in 2006 to 60.1 per cent, and the Workers' Party becoming the first opposition party to win a GRC.

         The percentage of respondents who support greater political pluralism and change in the electoral system had halved, from 35.8 per cent in a 2011 survey to 18 per cent this year.

         But the percentage of "conservatives" in support of the political status quo, doubled from 21.6 per cent in 2011 to 44.3 per cent this year.

         Lead researcher Gillian Koh said: "We are surprised that the number of people we consider to be pluralists has diminished.

         "Those who are still there are supportive of the political ideal of having opposition in Parliament, diverse views and a strong system of checks and balances."

         The "need for efficient government" was cited as the top priority among a list of 18 issues. About 98 per cent of respondents rated it as "important" or "very important".

         This was followed by "amount of government help for the needy", "fairness of government policy" and "cost of living", which at least 90 per cent deemed important or very important.

         The survey polled a random sample of 2,015 voting-age Singaporeans.

       

      MEDIA

       

      The findings were presented at a post-election conference yesterday to share the think-tank's analysis of the performance of the political parties, voter behaviour, and the influence and role of media in shaping the outcome of GE2015.

         One of the conclusions was that the use of the Internet and social media has not eroded the role of television and print newspapers in shaping voter attitudes. The majority of social media users (98.5 per cent) relied on traditional media sources like TV, newspapers and websites of Singapore's mainstream media outlets.

         IPS research fellow Carol Soon, who studies new media, said this shows that social media users had a relatively varied media diet and suggests that they are "more critical and discerning than they were thought to be".

       

      News, The New Paper, Thursday, November 5 2015, Pg 4

      Edited by The Code 06 Nov `15, 10:52AM
  • Alevelhist's Avatar
    10 posts since Dec '15
  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    260,620 posts since Dec '99
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