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  • heatob's Avatar
    11 posts since Mar '17
    • Hi guys, I'm currently 20 years old, waiting to apply citizenship next year so I could work in government sector. Would like to know my chances of getting the Singapore Citizenship with the details below:

      PR: Since 2000, applied under my father

      Race: Chinese

      Gender: Female

      Nationality: Malaysian

      Occupation/Income: Part time job/ bout $800 per mth

      Education: Diploma 

      Marital Status: Single

      Both of my family members are SPR, and have no intention of getting SC, thus rejected when they were invited. Will this affect my application?

      I am currently applying for VSC (volunteer special constabulary) and looking for a full-time job.

      The main thing I'm concerned about is the salary I am earning and my diploma (gpa not high enough for local U).

      Please Advise :3

      Edited by heatob 21 Apr `17, 4:21AM
  • Ponders's Avatar
    4,696 posts since Oct '99
    • If you are PR under your father you are 2nd Generation PR hence you need to serve NS.

      They will offer you Citizenship towards the end of NS if you did your NS with satisfactory conduct. This is a "100%" way to get citizenship.

      otherwise, based on the above info, don't think you have a high chance of getting citizenship until you show more "ties" to Singapore, as far as I know they try to see income of around $4000-6000 range.

      but requirements are more lax for Malaysians

  • minx's Avatar
    857 posts since Sep '15
    • Singapore is full-house.  

      You love the ever rising cost of living here ?   

      You love to pay the self-centred garbament highest pay?

      You aim to be pap minister in future? 

      We have many pap ministers from malaysia.    

    • Originally posted by Ponders:

      If you are PR under your father you are 2nd Generation PR hence you need to serve NS.

      They will offer you Citizenship towards the end of NS if you did your NS with satisfactory conduct. This is a "100%" way to get citizenship.

      otherwise, based on the above info, don't think you have a high chance of getting citizenship until you show more "ties" to Singapore, as far as I know they try to see income of around $4000-6000 range.

      but requirements are more lax for Malaysians

      Stated on the post ts is female.   

    • Your parents made the right choice to remain PR.   

      Know of a case a man converted to singapore citizen.   Larer he regretted and went back Malaysia.   He paid Malaysian govt money to become Malaysian again.   

  • <Precious>'s Avatar
    6,590 posts since Jul '06
    • Don't waste time for SG citizenship.....

      Better to apply one from Somalia or Timbucktu, Syria.. Nor Ko also can!

  • NotLikeThis's Avatar
    10 posts since May '17
  • minx's Avatar
    857 posts since Sep '15
    • Originally posted by NotLikeThis:

      go away plz. jiuhukia.

      Is a she, jiuhu charbor.    Don't know why she wants to live in a regressing country with the living costs keep rocketing high.   Jiuhu lang love the so called govt here, they are very supportive to the nasty regime blindly. 

  • Hlkhjx's Avatar
    4 posts since May '17
  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    264,658 posts since Dec '99
  • Guy80's Avatar
    1 post since Jun '17
    • Am in the same boat. Would like to know what are my chances of getting a Singapore PR status or ultimately a citizenship (before any idiots here post stupid comments - I'm doing this because my marriage isn't recognized and let's just say where I am doesn't exactly promote human rights equally). My story:

      - Born in Singapore to a British father and a Malaysian Mom who had SG PR. 

      - Been living in Malaysia for quite some time now. Still retaining British PR.

      - Would like to re-locate to Singapore to join Armed Forces for a career (long story) 

      Anyone with any viable knowledge on this, advise would be truly appreciated. Heck, if I do get the PR, I'll personally 'chia' the person dinner. 

      Please advise. 

       

       

  • gekpohboy's Avatar
    2,180 posts since Mar '16
    • To apply for Citizenship, click here:

      https://www.ica.gov.sg/page.aspx?pageid=132

      To apply for PR, click here:

      https://www.ica.gov.sg/page.aspx?pageid=151

      To obtain S-Pass, find a full-time job in Singapore, that pays at least S$2,200. You cannot apply yourself. The company has to apply for you.

      To find a full-time job in Singapore, click here:

      http://m.jobsdb.com/en-sg/search.do, or https://www.jobstreet.com.sg.

      To find a government job in Singapore, click here:

      https://www.careers.gov.sg.

      Edited by gekpohboy 12 Jun `17, 3:18PM
    • Originally posted by minx:

      Is a she, jiuhu charbor.    Don't know why she wants to live in a regressing country with the living costs keep rocketing high.   Jiuhu lang love the so called govt here, they are very supportive to the nasty regime blindly. 

      Because she's a Chinese.

      Chinese in Malaysia is minority, and Malaysia favour Malay people.

      Whereas for Singapore, we are majority Chinese.

      And we observe meritocracy; equal opportunities for all.

      That's why a lot of Malaysian Chinese like to come here.

      Edited by gekpohboy 12 Jun `17, 3:47PM
    • If I am a British subject, would I get preferential treatment? 

      Edited by gekpohboy 12 Jun `17, 4:07PM
    • Originally posted by heatob:

      Hi guys, I'm currently 20 years old, waiting to apply citizenship next year so I could work in government sector. Would like to know my chances of getting the Singapore Citizenship with the details below:

      PR: Since 2000, applied under my father

      Race: Chinese

      Gender: Female

      Nationality: Malaysian

      Occupation/Income: Part time job/ bout $800 per mth

      Education: Diploma 

      Marital Status: Single

      Both of my family members are SPR, and have no intention of getting SC, thus rejected when they were invited. Will this affect my application?

      I am currently applying for VSC (volunteer special constabulary) and looking for a full-time job.

      The main thing I'm concerned about is the salary I am earning and my diploma (gpa not high enough for local U).

      Please Advise :3

      I know of someone who came to Singapore as a PR, and got the Singapore Citizenship while he is in Poly.

      If someone who doesn't have diploma can get Citizenship, you definitely can get Citizenship, because you already have diploma.

      So don't worry. Just gan gan apply for Citizenship, next year when you turn 21 years old. Confirm can get one.

      Edited by gekpohboy 12 Jun `17, 3:49PM
    • Originally posted by Guy80:

      Am in the same boat. Would like to know what are my chances of getting a Singapore PR status or ultimately a citizenship (before any idiots here post stupid comments - I'm doing this because my marriage isn't recognized and let's just say where I am doesn't exactly promote human rights equally). My story:

      - Born in Singapore to a British father and a Malaysian Mom who had SG PR. 

      - Been living in Malaysia for quite some time now. Still retaining British PR.

      - Would like to re-locate to Singapore to join Armed Forces for a career (long story) 

      Anyone with any viable knowledge on this, advise would be truly appreciated. Heck, if I do get the PR, I'll personally 'chia' the person dinner. 

      Please advise. 

       

       

      I'm sorry. I don't know how to help you in this. Perhaps you may want to find your local MP, at the "Meet the People Session" conducted at your local neighbourhood, to advise you on what to do.

      Edited by gekpohboy 12 Jun `17, 3:42PM
  • Eunice is nice's Avatar
    13 posts since Jun '17
    • Contact Singapore: a victim of its own success?

      Singapore’s Ministry of Manpower and Economic Development Board rolled out the red carpet to arrivals from overseas when Singapore’s GDP was dipping. Today the welcome is nowhere near as warm.

      By Jack Chong, edited by Francesca Ross

      “I will no longer return to a cold, empty room after a long day, but to my family.” systems engineer Ms Wong Kit Yeng, declared from a 2009 glossy brochure that encouraged overseas Singaporeans to return home. In the wake of the global financial crisis, their country needed them.

      Singapore has always been lauded as the economic miracle of Asia but the 2007 stock market crash saw the country’s GDP contract 2% in 2009. Something needed to be done. The Singaporean government established the Contact Singapore (CS) Alliance to attract both Singaporeans living abroad, and foreigners to take up residence in Singapore and drive growth. The strategy had two parts; one under the Economic Development Board (EDB), and the other under the Ministry of Manpower (MOM).

      The alliance provided overseas businesses with access to entrepreneurial networks and consultancy services for expansion into Singapore. It also administered the Global Investor Programme (GIP) which granted wealthy foreigners the right to stay in the island-nation permanently if they made significant investments.

      The idea was to put Singapore at the heart of Asia

      Singapore had adopted this open-to-the-world, growth-at-all costs economic policy to revitalise its flailing post-crash economy. It was also hoped this would balance out the impact of a stubbornly low birth rate. The alliance’s investor programme brought foreign money into areas that would grow the economy, such as digital technologies.

      These fresh ideas from foreign talent would create an entrepreneurial environment and grow the “disruptive” approach needed for a knowledge economy, the government thought. The results were excellent. The city-state enjoyed an estimated 11% compounded annual growth rate (CAGR)between 2008 and 2010.

      Foreign direct investment and foreign talent flooded into Singapore

      Contact Singapore was a success. Lim Hng Kiang, the Minister for Trade and Industry, said, “Over the past three years, the GIP has attracted close to 1,000 investors who have invested over US$ 1.5 billion … Close to 100 have invested directly in businesses … creating some 1,500 jobs.”

      Many highly-qualified global expats were drawn to Singapore’s new economic opportunities. The annual increase in foreign workers (excluding foreign domestic workers) was 67,000. This outpaced the 51,000 for local employment between 2010 and 2012.

      Overseas Singaporeans were, in theory, keen to return home

      A Robert Walters survey showed an overwhelming 82% of Overseas Singaporeans were interested in returning home in 2015. This was even as the number of Overseas Singaporeans increased by 10%, hitting 200,000 in 2016.

      Representatives for Contact Singapore fuelled this by collaborating with the Overseas Singaporean Unit. They gave keynote speeches, and made appearances at overseas recruitment events to encourage overseas Singaporeans to return home. Citizens living outside the country were reminded that their international experience made the increasingly valuable to their homeland.

      The problem was that this group saw returning home as a form of insurance in case they fail overseas, rather than a goal in itself. Opportunities back home, although appealing, needed to be significantly better than those being offered overseas to bring people back. Expat works saw no such problem and were happy to take jobs in Singaporean businesses.

      The floodgates were opened without due consideration for local sensibilities

      Contact Singapore’s work helped bring in foreign talent and investment but they were not always welcome. Locals felt their standard of living had diminished thanks to these newcomers. Crowded public transport and rising housing prices created much unhappiness.

      Among a wave of public discontent, the ruling People’s Action Party (PAP) lost the Aljunied GRC in the watershed 2011 General Elections. The government subsequently tightened its manpower policies to cut the number of people arriving.

      Foreigners did not integrate well and online chatter created unrest

      The problem was that the alliance made no efforts to integrate foreigners into the local culture. New arrivals lived separately from the locals and benefitted from handsome expat packages. Regular cultural assimilation programs would have helped soften their image and break down barriers.

      The internet was another thorn in the side of successful integration. Online discussion ran wild with speculation about companies preferring foreign talent over local workers, while the government continually defended their pro-foreigner growth policies. No one appeared to be batting for the local team.

      The government eventually established the Jobs Bank to enforce fair hiring practices. Companies flouting the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) Fair Consideration Framework were placed on a watch list and had their employment pass applications revoked.

      Residency programmes were tweaked to ensure a more sustainable commitment

      The way people qualified for permanent residency also changed. For example, any money spent on buying a home in Singapore was no longer counted as part of the millions of dollars in investment required. Individuals also found renewing their permanent residency was more difficult; their business needed to spend at last a million Singaporean dollars in the country each year and have at least five local employees.

      This indicated a shift away from a cut-and-run business mentality which treated employees as disposable to instead building businesses that were sustainable long-term. More commitment from foreigners would entrench them in Singapore and keep the economy working smoothly.

      Foreign workers were often employed by the regional head offices for multinational corporations; mostly dealing with sales and marketing functions. This situation will need to change for research and training opportunities to be a success. Innovation cannot take root unless a country can scale new technologies.

      It is now more difficult to gain permanent residency status

      Permanent residency applications now take up to a year to process. This is three times as long as previously. The number of successful applications has also dropped. The average figure between 2010 and 2015 was around 29,000, this is almost half of the 58,000 new PRs between 2004 and 2008.

      Local workers needed more support

      The boom in expats could have been handled better. Unemployment benefits could tide over displaced professionals, managers, executives and technicians who felt they had missed out thanks to foreign arrivals. Foreign firms should also be encouraged to promote local workers. Corporate tax relief could be given to companies when they appoint Singaporeans to senior roles.

      Today, the Ministry of Manpower element of Contact Singapore is no more. The growth of digital platforms made its services obsolete. Foreigners could source housing directly through online platforms and international recruitment firms were bringing a steady flow of global talent into the country. An email to subscribers on 21 February announced that the project was officially discontinued; although the brand will continue under the ambit of the Economic Development Board.

      Contact Singapore, as an alliance, was eventually a victim of its own success. The flood of successful and patriotic people it brought to the country both achieved its objectives and sowed the seeds for its demise. The project is dead but the spirit of supporting the homeland remains strong.

  • ButlerInSuits's Avatar
    2 posts since Jan '17
  • JesLiu's Avatar
    9 posts since Jul '17
    • I do not think it is difficult to apply for citizenship in Singapore. I have ex-colleague who is a Malaysian and seems like pretty easy to become a Singaporean within 1 a year. It could be that she has a full time job and a son.

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    264,658 posts since Dec '99
    • Originally posted by JesLiu:

      I do not think it is difficult to apply for citizenship in Singapore. I have ex-colleague who is a Malaysian and seems like pretty easy to become a Singaporean within 1 a year. It could be that she has a full time job and a son.

      marry singaporean?

      so born in singapore?

       

      u sure is singaporean? or just PR?

  • Ivankoh 97's Avatar
    4 posts since Aug '17
  • gekpohboy's Avatar
    2,180 posts since Mar '16
    • Originally posted by Ivankoh 97:

       

      Ok, good for you.

      Edited by FireIce 08 Aug `17, 12:10PM
    • Originally posted by Eunice is nice:

      Contact Singapore: a victim of its own success?

      Singapore’s Ministry of Manpower and Economic Development Board rolled out the red carpet to arrivals from overseas when Singapore’s GDP was dipping. Today the welcome is nowhere near as warm.

      By Jack Chong, edited by Francesca Ross

      “I will no longer return to a cold, empty room after a long day, but to my family.” systems engineer Ms Wong Kit Yeng, declared from a 2009 glossy brochure that encouraged overseas Singaporeans to return home. In the wake of the global financial crisis, their country needed them.

      Singapore has always been lauded as the economic miracle of Asia but the 2007 stock market crash saw the country’s GDP contract 2% in 2009. Something needed to be done. The Singaporean government established the Contact Singapore (CS) Alliance to attract both Singaporeans living abroad, and foreigners to take up residence in Singapore and drive growth. The strategy had two parts; one under the Economic Development Board (EDB), and the other under the Ministry of Manpower (MOM).

      The alliance provided overseas businesses with access to entrepreneurial networks and consultancy services for expansion into Singapore. It also administered the Global Investor Programme (GIP) which granted wealthy foreigners the right to stay in the island-nation permanently if they made significant investments.

      The idea was to put Singapore at the heart of Asia

      Singapore had adopted this open-to-the-world, growth-at-all costs economic policy to revitalise its flailing post-crash economy. It was also hoped this would balance out the impact of a stubbornly low birth rate. The alliance’s investor programme brought foreign money into areas that would grow the economy, such as digital technologies.

      These fresh ideas from foreign talent would create an entrepreneurial environment and grow the “disruptive” approach needed for a knowledge economy, the government thought. The results were excellent. The city-state enjoyed an estimated 11% compounded annual growth rate (CAGR)between 2008 and 2010.

      Foreign direct investment and foreign talent flooded into Singapore

      Contact Singapore was a success. Lim Hng Kiang, the Minister for Trade and Industry, said, “Over the past three years, the GIP has attracted close to 1,000 investors who have invested over US$ 1.5 billion … Close to 100 have invested directly in businesses … creating some 1,500 jobs.”

      Many highly-qualified global expats were drawn to Singapore’s new economic opportunities. The annual increase in foreign workers (excluding foreign domestic workers) was 67,000. This outpaced the 51,000 for local employment between 2010 and 2012.

      Overseas Singaporeans were, in theory, keen to return home

      A Robert Walters survey showed an overwhelming 82% of Overseas Singaporeans were interested in returning home in 2015. This was even as the number of Overseas Singaporeans increased by 10%, hitting 200,000 in 2016.

      Representatives for Contact Singapore fuelled this by collaborating with the Overseas Singaporean Unit. They gave keynote speeches, and made appearances at overseas recruitment events to encourage overseas Singaporeans to return home. Citizens living outside the country were reminded that their international experience made the increasingly valuable to their homeland.

      The problem was that this group saw returning home as a form of insurance in case they fail overseas, rather than a goal in itself. Opportunities back home, although appealing, needed to be significantly better than those being offered overseas to bring people back. Expat works saw no such problem and were happy to take jobs in Singaporean businesses.

      The floodgates were opened without due consideration for local sensibilities

      Contact Singapore’s work helped bring in foreign talent and investment but they were not always welcome. Locals felt their standard of living had diminished thanks to these newcomers. Crowded public transport and rising housing prices created much unhappiness.

      Among a wave of public discontent, the ruling People’s Action Party (PAP) lost the Aljunied GRC in the watershed 2011 General Elections. The government subsequently tightened its manpower policies to cut the number of people arriving.

      Foreigners did not integrate well and online chatter created unrest

      The problem was that the alliance made no efforts to integrate foreigners into the local culture. New arrivals lived separately from the locals and benefitted from handsome expat packages. Regular cultural assimilation programs would have helped soften their image and break down barriers.

      The internet was another thorn in the side of successful integration. Online discussion ran wild with speculation about companies preferring foreign talent over local workers, while the government continually defended their pro-foreigner growth policies. No one appeared to be batting for the local team.

      The government eventually established the Jobs Bank to enforce fair hiring practices. Companies flouting the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) Fair Consideration Framework were placed on a watch list and had their employment pass applications revoked.

      Residency programmes were tweaked to ensure a more sustainable commitment

      The way people qualified for permanent residency also changed. For example, any money spent on buying a home in Singapore was no longer counted as part of the millions of dollars in investment required. Individuals also found renewing their permanent residency was more difficult; their business needed to spend at last a million Singaporean dollars in the country each year and have at least five local employees.

      This indicated a shift away from a cut-and-run business mentality which treated employees as disposable to instead building businesses that were sustainable long-term. More commitment from foreigners would entrench them in Singapore and keep the economy working smoothly.

      Foreign workers were often employed by the regional head offices for multinational corporations; mostly dealing with sales and marketing functions. This situation will need to change for research and training opportunities to be a success. Innovation cannot take root unless a country can scale new technologies.

      It is now more difficult to gain permanent residency status

      Permanent residency applications now take up to a year to process. This is three times as long as previously. The number of successful applications has also dropped. The average figure between 2010 and 2015 was around 29,000, this is almost half of the 58,000 new PRs between 2004 and 2008.

      Local workers needed more support

      The boom in expats could have been handled better. Unemployment benefits could tide over displaced professionals, managers, executives and technicians who felt they had missed out thanks to foreign arrivals. Foreign firms should also be encouraged to promote local workers. Corporate tax relief could be given to companies when they appoint Singaporeans to senior roles.

      Today, the Ministry of Manpower element of Contact Singapore is no more. The growth of digital platforms made its services obsolete. Foreigners could source housing directly through online platforms and international recruitment firms were bringing a steady flow of global talent into the country. An email to subscribers on 21 February announced that the project was officially discontinued; although the brand will continue under the ambit of the Economic Development Board.

      Contact Singapore, as an alliance, was eventually a victim of its own success. The flood of successful and patriotic people it brought to the country both achieved its objectives and sowed the seeds for its demise. The project is dead but the spirit of supporting the homeland remains strong.

      Thanks for the information.

    • Originally posted by Hlkhjx:

      Being Malaysian already helps quite abit

      Doesn't matter if you are Malaysian. Malaysia or not, the same rules apply for everyone.

      Edited by gekpohboy 08 Aug `17, 12:22PM
    • Originally posted by JesLiu:

      I do not think it is difficult to apply for citizenship in Singapore. I have ex-colleague who is a Malaysian and seems like pretty easy to become a Singaporean within 1 a year. It could be that she has a full time job and a son.

      家家有本难念的经

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