31 Jul, 03:20PM in sunny Singapore!

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  • blackgolf's Avatar
    2 posts since Jul '15
    • i call up TC they say still got wish leh.

      but i need to know whether TC good anot? the officer told me $94/day, rebate $400/mth. rebate only $400/mth meh? i tot is $6xx/mth?

      can anyone verify pls?

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    251,749 posts since Dec '99
    • when i opened the acct the int rate quite good (no fees no min. balance)

      then it went all the way down

      so i perpersly left 10 bucks inside to keep the acct but no want them to have my money

       

       

      now they want charge 5 bucks for balance below 1k

       

      so 去死吧

      dun even want to let them have $11.05

  • 我很cute的,我不会咬你的
    TehJarVu's Avatar
    111,040 posts since Dec '03
  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    251,749 posts since Dec '99
  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    251,749 posts since Dec '99
  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    251,749 posts since Dec '99
    • win10 like not much diff..........

      asthetically a little more frenly compared to 8.1

      those useless default stuff i all switch off or did not activate

      Edited by FireIce 31 Jul `15, 2:27PM
  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    251,749 posts since Dec '99
    • tupid SCB going to charge fees for the e$aver
      (why they had e$aver in the first place, have they forgotten?!?!?!)

      so im going to close it and take out my $11.05

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    251,749 posts since Dec '99
    • ya. collecting dust on the shelf

      but i 不舍得 discard 

      put these in my room makes me look more cultured teeth.png

      Edited by FireIce 31 Jul `15, 2:28PM
  • 我很cute的,我不会咬你的
    TehJarVu's Avatar
    111,040 posts since Dec '03
  • jurongresident's Avatar
    104 posts since Jul '09
    • Sorry. What I meant was the SMRT buses previously at Bulim bus depot.

      Anyway, I think forget it. Whoever managing the lists just add in "(as of ....)" at the title, for the time being. Wait until everything saturated already then update. Because I think the changes in fleet deployment may happen quite often. Unless, they are okay with that.

      Edited by jurongresident 31 Jul `15, 2:07PM
  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    251,749 posts since Dec '99
    • posted my Singa in IG

       

      how come no label or what to say which Singa it is................

  • BusAnalayzer's Avatar
    7,188 posts since May '12
    • Originally posted by jurongresident:

      So, what happens to the SMRT buses?

      There will be major redeployment of buses happening for both sbst and smrt services... those managing sgwiki pages gear up for endless hours to ensure the pages are upto date.

  • jurongresident's Avatar
    104 posts since Jul '09
  • Ee Hoe Hean Club's Avatar
    199 posts since Aug '13
    • Using economic leverage, political pressure, and social activism, the world must support the Tibetan people's nonviolent struggle to end Chinese rule and establish a free and democratic Tibet.

       

      I thought the CIA trained Tibetans to kill chinese, how come non violent struggle?

       

       

      We only lived to kill Chinese,’ recalled one Tibetan veteran.

      ‘Our hopes were high.’ One of the trainees, Gyato Wangdu (who would later become the last commander of the Chushi Gandrug), asked CIA operations officer Roger McCarthy for ‘a portable nuclear weapon of some kind…that the trainees might employ to destroy Chinese by the hundreds.’ The CIA declined, but McCarthy noted that Wangdu ‘did take to demolition training with renewed enthusiasm’ and became quite taken with bazookas and mortars.

      By fall of 1957, Tibetans who had never seen a sky boat were jumping out of one in the cold light of a full moon over Tibet. One of the first jumpers, Athar Norbu, remembered: ‘We could see the Tsangpo River below us gleaming in the dark. There were no clouds. It was a clear night. Happiness surged through me…[as] we went rattling out of the plane.’ In Lhasa, Athar Norbu and a fellow guerrilla made contact with Gompo Tashi. This ultrasecret project was code-named ‘ST Circus.’

      The CIA was now in the fight...

      http://www.historynet.com/cias-secret-war-in-tibet.htm

       

      Edited by Ee Hoe Hean Club 31 Jul `15, 1:17PM
  • lemon1974's Avatar
    7,693 posts since Dec '04
    • recruitment only start in Sept and your friends got the jobs already?

       

      Tower Transit takes over Bulim Bus Depot; recruitment to start in September

      http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/transport/tower-transit-takes-over-bulim-bus-depot-recruitment-to-start-in-september

      SINGAPORE - Tower Transit, Singapore's third local bus operator, has taken over Bulim Bus Depot in Jurong West. The depot is expected to be ready in two months' time.

      Recruitment is expected to begin in September, Tower Transit said in a press release on Friday (July 31).

      The London-based company won an inaugural government bus contract in May, beating seven other firms including incumbents SMRT and SBS Transit.

       

      According to Tower Transit CEO Adam Leishman, the depot will be extensively out-fitted with conducive areas for rest, meals and recreation for bus captains, and will also be the company's base of operations.

      "I expect the offer we will be making to drivers will be very attractive to a variety of individuals and will encourage Singaporeans outside the bus industry to consider a new career as we seek to bring exemplary service to Singapore," said Mr Leishman.

      The company will operate 26 bus services from the Jurong East, Bukit Batok and Clementi bus interchanges progressively from the second quarter of 2016.

      Edited by lemon1974 31 Jul `15, 1:15PM
  • BusAnalayzer's Avatar
    7,188 posts since May '12
  • Moderator
    Aik TC's Avatar
    906 posts since Jun '10
    • Undefeated in Death: Tenzin Delek Rinpoche

      Huffington Post July 30, 2015 01:15 Tenzin Dorjee

      Few people have done more for Tibet than Tenzin Delek Rinpoche. Born in Lithang, an eastern Tibetan region famous for its fine horses and fearless warriors, Tenzin Delek started off as an unknown lama of humble origins. But through extensive social and humanitarian work, he established scores of clinics, schools and orphanages. He built nunneries to educate women, and nursing homes for the elderly. He settled long-simmering disputes between families. Criminals who couldn't be tamed by multiple stints in prison were miraculously subdued and reformed by Rinpoche.

      His profound impact on the community didn't stop there. He fought against China's rampant deforestation in Tibet, and the alarming rate of desertification. He battled mining companies - and sometimes succeeded in keeping them out of the region. This angered local Chinese officials, who were often in collusion with the extractive industries.

      Predictably, the authorities tried to arrest him in 1997 by connecting him to pro-independence leaflets. Rinpoche fled to the mountains. The local communities, staging risky protests, persuaded the authorities to leave Rinpoche alone. When he returned to the village in 1998, thousands of villagers gave him a hero's welcome.

      However, he was now a marked man. In 2002, Chinese authorities arrested him and sentenced him to death for the false charge of "bombing." Rinpoche was put to a sham trial whose foregone conclusion was to lock him up. Following a sustained global campaign to save his life, his sentence was commuted to life imprisonment.

      As a result of harsh prison conditions, Rinpoche's health quickly deteriorated - for Tibetan political prisoners, torture and beatings are routine and well documented. Despite repeated appeals by his family and public expressions of concern from world leaders, China denied him medical care.

      Though we knew Rinpoche was ill, his death shocked us all the same. But what China did afterward took their cruelty to yet another level.

      For Tibetan Buddhists, if there is one thing more important than life, it is the moment immediately following one's death, when the Tibetan Book of the Dead is read out loud to guide the dead person's soul toward spiritual liberation. In this period, one's consciousness passes through what Buddhists call the "clear light moment," an opportunity to propel one's consciousness into higher rebirth, even enlightenment.

      Rinpoche was denied this opportunity, as his body lay in a high-security prison for days. Even as thousands of Tibetans demanded the return of his body to give him the traditional Buddhist final rites, a right provided by the Chinese constitution, the prison authorities illegally withheld his body. In an unforgivable act of insult against a whole nation and religion, the prison guards secretly cremated Rinpoche's body. Last week, when his relatives were carrying Rinpoche's ashes to his hometown, Chinese police stopped them and forcibly seized the ashes. They then effectively abducted Rinpoche's sister Dolkar Lhamo and her daughter, both of whom are still missing.

      In life, they robbed him of his freedom. In death, they robbed him of his liberation. But there was one thing they could never take away from Rinpoche: his dignity. He died undefeated.

      Thanks to this brand of Tibetan dignity - and a stubborn hope against all odds - even after sixty years of colonial occupation, Tibet remains unconquered. Tibetans continue to see the exile government in Dharamsala, not Beijing, as their true representative. Since 2009, roughly 150 Tibetans have self-immolated to protest Chinese rule.

      Rinpoche's death, tragic as it was, will initiate yet another generation of Tibetans into the freedom struggle. Instead of merely praising Tibetan pacifism, world leaders must turn up the heat on China. Using economic leverage, political pressure, and social activism, the world must support the Tibetan people's nonviolent struggle to end Chinese rule and establish a free and democratic Tibet.
      <!--[endif]-->

      Edited by Aik TC 31 Jul `15, 12:26PM
  • BusAnalayzer's Avatar
    7,188 posts since May '12
    • Originally posted by carbikebus:

      Unbelieveable to see svc 49 gets more than 85 pax!Usually i see only packed lower deck but a few on upper deck during peak hours

      Yes. It is interesting. That's why I find loading patterns exciting. My understanding is 49 loading in PM to Taman Jurong is very high because

       - people don't need to climb stairs and go to other side for 154/246. can take 49 directly from same side

      - bus apps make it easy for commuters to check when next bus is arriving and can just wait few mins for 49 than cross overhead bridge (no escalators)

      - If 98 has not called the stop, you will also have those for Corporation Dr taking 49

      In AM... I haven't observed but I believe, people will prefer 240/246/254 instead of 49/98 from Taman Jurong to Lakeside. 

  • Moderator
    Aik TC's Avatar
    906 posts since Jun '10
    • The story of Sikkim’s last king and queen reads like a fairy tale gone wrong

      1 August 2015 The Spectator

      Glamour, romance and a deposed monarch are vividly evoked in Andrew Duff’s nostalgic history of the beleaguered Himalayan former kingdom

      Sikkim was a Himalayan kingdom a third of the size of Wales squeezed between China, India, Nepal and Bhutan. I was there once in April, when the sky was cornflower blue. When Britain withdrew from India the last ‘Chogyal’, or king, battled for his country’s independence, but Mrs Ghandi won the war, and Sikkim is an Indian state now. It’s a sad story, as Andrew Duff’s subtitle suggests, but one representative of 20th-century geopolitics.

      This dense book — Duff’s first — places Chogyal Thondup Namgyal at the centre of the story and focuses exclusively on the period from the 1950s to the 1970s. Sikkim’s strategic position is crucial, particularly as the Cold War hots up, and spies from Peking, Delhi and Washington sidle on and off the pages. Everyone gets particularly worked up about Tibet (Sikkim, unlike most of the other princely states, was and is Buddhist, and had strong ties with the Lhasa theocracy). The Chogyal’s sister Coocoola, an important figure, was passionate about the Tibetan cause and rode the trade route over to Gyantse with a rifle over her shoulder and a revolver in her pocket.

      There is, too, a touch of Grace Kelly glamour, as in the lounge of the Windermere Hotel in Darjeeling Thondup met a 20-year-old American beauty called Hope Cooke. They married in 1963, ‘in the shadow of the Sino-Indian conflict’. A scarlet-robed lama officiated, and the Maharaja of Jaipur brought his own champagne. Cooke embraced her new country, but noted astutely: ‘I can just see them using me as a wedge to help destroy his [Thondup’s] rule.’ And they did. The tide turned against her almost everywhere, as tides always do. Newsweek called her ‘a Himalayan Marie-Antoinette’, and Henry Kissinger (who pops up frequently) wrote, with characteristic sensitivity: ‘She has become more Buddhist than the population.’


      Duff has undertaken diligent research in diplomatic archives across the world and it is hard to imagine there is much information about this small place in those decades that has escaped his attention. Just as he finished his first draft, Wikileaks released 500 secret cables revealing fresh information about US involvement in Sikkim. As Duff writes: ‘The patchwork of alliances and enmities surrounding and within Sikkim had the characteristics of a fiendishly complex multi-player game of chess.’ China did not recognise Sikkim as part of India until 2005.

      I would have liked more background information on the topography and customs of thin-aired Sikkim, and in particular on the various ethnic groups (they barely get a mention). Duff mentions ‘Sikkim’s separate identity’, but one never gets a clear sense of what it is. Equally, while I admire the author’s refusal to indulge in speculation, he remarks often that the relationship between Cooke and Thondup was ‘never simple’, yet these pages offer the reader little insight on how.

      As is often the case with nationalist causes, Sikkim wanted to be free of India but was heavily reliant on the aid flowing from Delhi. Inevitably, Mrs Gandhi got her way and annexed the kingdom in 1975. Duff is sympathetic to Thondup and instinctively on his side, but he makes it clear that the man was not an adept politician. Emotion ruled the day — when his minders in Calcutta refused to let him fly the Sikkim flag on his car, he let the vehicle proceed without him and walked with an assistant holding the flag.

      In short, he was not up to his job. One wonders who would have been, with almost every superpower on the case. ‘Everyone agrees,’ writes Duff, ‘that Sikkim’s sensitive geopolitical position dealt Thondup an almost unplayable hand.’ At least the state enjoys relative peace now, living off hydroelectricity and tourism — unlike Tibet. But one has ample evidence that Beijing will not rest until cultural annihilation on the plateau is complete.

      As a result of a referendum, the monarchy was abolished in 1975, and the marriage crumbled under the strain of events. Cooke left the modest palace in Sikkim’s capital, Gangtok, and returned to America with her two children. Thondup died in 1982, and Cooke lives on in New York, though she refused to meet Duff. He quotes judiciously from her autobiography Time Change.

       This a wonderful story, expertly told, and, given the Everest of books on India, Duff was clever to spot it. What a film it would make!

      Edited by Aik TC 31 Jul `15, 12:22PM
  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    251,749 posts since Dec '99
  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    251,749 posts since Dec '99
  • Moderator
    A Level Chem, O Level Chem + Phys / Bio @ BedokFunland JC
    UltimaOnline's Avatar
    5,540 posts since May '05
    • Btw Gohby, this thread is getting too long, please start a new thread each time you ask new questions, with the title reflecting the topics involved. This is for efficiency of viewing by members and visitors. Thanks.

      Edited by UltimaOnline 31 Jul `15, 11:17AM
  • Private.tour.guide.Batam's Avatar
    1 post since Jul '15
  • jurongresident's Avatar
    104 posts since Jul '09
    • With regards to the new bus service in Jurong, I feel that there is no need for another bus route at Corporation Road. There is already a well-established set of bus routes at Corporation Drive. We can extend route 49 to Jurong East Bus Interchange, to complement route 178 at AYE, while provide direct bus connection to Jurong East Bus Interchange from Taman Jurong.

      Personally, if you ask me, I feel that what Corporation Road needs is more street lights at night. At night, it's quite dark and there's hardly any people out on the streets at Corporation Road. Alternatively, JTC can make changes to land use plans to have high-rise industrial buildings along Corporation Road - similar to the ones coming up at Bu Lim Avenue - to make the place brighter at night and more safe to be in.

      Edited by jurongresident 31 Jul `15, 11:14AM
  • Rondy's Avatar
    5 posts since Jul '15