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  • AntiDennisLance's Avatar
    1,183 posts since Jul '03
    • I'm not a fan of any SD bus, but this new MAN SD makes so much more sense than the original ones with "hair" - the "hair" serves no purpose at all (aesthetically to me it just makes it look big headed and unbalanced too) and adds to the material cost of the metal and adds cost for additional fuel to carry that deadweight around.

      The A24's looked much more balanced compared to the A22's when they first came out.

  • CB2883J's Avatar
    394 posts since Sep '15
    • Originally posted by sgbuses:

      At this rate, trying to track each minor or major design change by batch alone simply makes no sense anymore. The nomenclature has to evolve with MAN/GML/STK too:

      SD configuration:

      • SMB138Y - MAN Lion's City SD (Euro V), MCV eVolution > rebodied to Gemilang Mark I
      • All SMB plated, SG1700U to SG1748H - MAN Lion's City SD (Euro V), Gemilang Mark I
      • SG4002G - MAN Lion's City SD (Euro V, 3 doors), Gemilang Mark II
      • SG1751Y onwards - MAN Lion's City SD (Euro VI), Gemilang Mark III

      DD configuration:

      • SMB5888H - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro V), Gemilang Prototype
      • All SMB plated (except SMB5888H), SG5740C to SG5799J - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro V), Gemilang Mark I
      • SG5999Z - MAN Lion's City DD L (Euro V), Gemilang Mark II
      • SG5800M to SG5829G - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro V), Gemilang Mark II
      • SG5830B to SG5920A - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro V), Gemilang Mark III
      • SG2017C - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro VI), Gemilang Mark III
      • SG5921A onwards - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro VI), Gemilang Mark IV

      Articulated bus configuration:

      • SMB388S, SMB80XX - MAN Lion's City GL, Gemilang Mark I

      Then divide each Mark type by batches separately.

      The number increases by one for each Windows 10 style update to their bodywork (Gemilang Mark V, Gemilang Mark VI, ...Gemilang Mark IX, Gemilang Mark X, etc.). Windows 10 style updates should be expected as the norm, not the exception. Hence we need to allow this nomenclature to scale until at least 2025.

      There is only that many times you can call the design a facelift. You can say the same for ADL Enviro500 MMC too (their "facelift MMC" would similarly be Enviro500 MMC Mk II).

      Yes, the Lion's City brand is applied retrospectively. But the marketing material and technical evidence indicates this is the manufacturer/distributor's intention and this should keep the certain bus lobbyists very happy for decades to come. And there appears to be no strict adherance to the traditional European requirements as well when it comes to naming a Lion's City product, at least if it's not integral anyway.

      As for overseas units (such as Hong Kong and Sydney), you can call them MAN Lion's City if you like. Apply duck test (if it looks like a duck, sounds like a duck, it's a duck). The overseas distributors doesn't seem to mind anyway.

      At this point it is a matter of when, not if, new articulated buses from MAN and Gemilang shows up in the future. We can then call them MAN Lion's City GL (Euro VI), Gemilang Mark II and so on.

      Have read. Two questions:

      1) Was the different nomenclature for the latest design sans foglights (Mark III for SDs, Mark IV for DDs) intentional? I personally thought it would have made more sense to harmonise the numbering across bus types as much as possible, since we know SG1751Y and SG5921A have the same frontal design.

      2) How can you be so certain of new articulated buses coming?

  • CB2883J's Avatar
    394 posts since Sep '15
    • Originally posted by ND323F:


      Download the entire tender specs. It is in schedule 1

      He'll need a GEBiz account to do that.

  • Moderator
    Aik TC's Avatar
    1,648 posts since Jun '10
    • Saffron Curtain: How Buddhism Was Weaponized During the Cold War

      AMAR DIWAKAR March 23, 2018 New Republic

      The U.S. tried to foment an anti-communist Buddhist bloc in Southeast Asia—with deadly consequences for the region’s politics today.

      Of the world’s major faiths, Buddhism is often characterized as being a religion of peace, tolerance, and compassion. The Western encounter with Buddhism has largely been distilled through yoga, the beatniks, Hollywood, and Dalai Lama quotes shared on Facebook. But even a cursory glance at the news that emanates from the Buddhist world reveals a more sanguinary state of affairs.

      In Myanmar, ultra-nationalist monks have fueled a genocidal crusade against the country’s Rohingya Muslim population. In Thailand, the government has responded to a long-running Malay Muslim insurgency in its southern provinces by fostering a Buddhist militarism, encouraging monks in local temples to ally with the armed forces. And in Sri Lanka, the Buddhist-majority Sinhalese were engaged in a bitter civil war against the Hindu-minority Tamils for decades. More recently, Buddhist nationalists there have stoked anti-Muslim riots.

      Still, Buddhism continues to have an alien aura, as if it were an “entirely otherworldly religion with a gnostic distaste for the worldly order,” as the scholar Ian Harris has written. There is a tendency to frame the rise of Buddhist nationalism as an anomalous phenomenon. In fact, as the historian Eugene Ford shows in his book Cold War Monks: Buddhism and America’s Secret Strategy in Southeast Asia, the Buddhist world was a laboratory of competing visions and ideologies in the Cold War—an experiment that helped politicize Buddhism into the often violent, reactionary force we see in Southeast Asia today.

      Buddhism and statecraft have long been joined at the hip. The religion supplied the symbols of kingship in courts, capitals, and urban centers from Burma (now Myanmar) to Siam (Thailand) to Laos, as monastic orders and ruling elites forged intimate ties. Following the seventeenth century, European imperialism disrupted the symbiosis of religion and state in places where colonial regimes were installed. By the early half of the twentieth century, anti-colonial movements saw monks participate in dissent, laying the foundations for the clergy to enter secular affairs.

      The exception was Thailand, the only country in the region to avoid formal colonization. It was a distinction that shaped its nationalist narrative, which glorified the monarchy while sheltering its monks from the activism of their counterparts in neighboring countries. However, during World War II, imperial Japan’s occupation of Bangkok offered a harbinger of the outside pressures that would be released upon Buddhism in the postwar era. Tsusho Byoto, an obscure Japanese scholar-monk, advocated a militarized conception of Zen in an attempt to recruit the guarded Thai monastic order to the fascist cause. While he ultimately failed, Byoto’s “vision of an internationalized Thai monkhood would in many ways prove prophetic,” Ford writes.

      The immediate postwar aftermath saw revolutionary nationalist movements proliferate from Indonesia to Vietnam, guided by an anti-colonial ethos informed by Marxism. Colonial powers waged costly and ultimately doomed counterrevolutionary wars to reestablish control, which then dovetailed with the U.S.’s anti-communist efforts as Europe withdrew from the scene.

      A military-strategic alliance with the U.S. became the central pillar of Thailand’s foreign relations after 1947, drawing the rest of Southeast Asia into a turbulent geopolitical orbit. The partnership early on faced two challenges: Thailand had to keep up the appearance that the conservative monkhood was segregated from the political realm, while adherence to the First Amendment prevented any direct U.S. involvement in Thailand’s religious affairs. All this did was compel Washington to operate clandestinely, as it began to shape a pliable Buddhist bloc that would act as its proxy.

      The gravitational forces of the Cold War would cause the Buddhist clergy to become more politicized and more internationalized than ever before. In 1953, during the Eisenhower administration, Vice President Richard Nixon undertook a formative trip across Asia. In Vietnam, Nixon visited the front lines of the Indochina Wars to witness a French offensive against Viet Minh insurgents. He was frustrated by France’s patronizing attitude toward its Vietnamese allies, and disturbed by a failure to establish a legitimate cause to counter the stirring appeal of their anti-colonial adversaries.

      The defeat of the French at Dien Bien Phu in 1954 then made it clear that military action itself was insufficient to combat communism in the region. Hearts and minds—or, pagodas and temples—were going to be just as essential. Religion, Ford says, “was a lever the United States could use to wield influence of a nonmilitary or psychological nature, not least by emphasizing to local populations the supposed communist threat to their religious institutions.”

      Coinciding with Washington’s strategy at the time was the emergence of a pan-Buddhist consciousness. Advancements in communication and transportation had accelerated religious and cultural exchange and deepened interconnectivity within the milieu of Theravada Buddhism, the predominant strain of Buddhism in Southeast Asia. The 2,500th anniversary of the Buddha’s death inspired the launch of the first international Buddhist organization in 1950: the World Fellowship of Buddhists. Coupled with the 1954 staging of the Great Buddhist Synod in Burma, there were signs that the consolidation of a Buddhist bloc was ripe for engagement.

      The earliest of U.S. efforts began in Burma between 1951 and 1952. Burma’s Prime Minister U Nu had been battling a domestic communist insurgency since 1948 and looked to incorporate “Burmese Buddhism” into an anti-communist program. This was well received by Washington, as conveyed by a 1951 State Department memo to its embassy in Rangoon. The memo highlighted the rules of engagement as it applied to U.S. funding of religious activities, which had to be undertaken through private channels to obscure any official links.

      The CIA deepened such activity across the region. As early as 1948, it harvested intelligence on Bangkok’s Vietnamese monasteries to monitor for potential communist links. At the invitation of the U Nu government, the Committee for a Free Asia—which was renamed the Asia Foundation in 1954—became active in Burma in 1952, bankrolled by the CIA through the National Committee for a Free Europe. (Much of Ford’s archival sources come from the Asia Foundation.) The Asia Foundation had extensive behind-the-scenes involvement in the Great Buddhist Synod. By 1962, Ford notes, it had contributed over $300,000 in the form of original printing equipment and technical advice to make “Burma’s Buddha Sasana Press the world’s largest and best equipped Buddhist publishing house.”

      The Asia Foundation would then expand its operations into neighboring Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos. Harnessing the foundation’s platform and networks in the region, Washington provided grants to Buddhist educational and civic groups, and distributed anti-communist propaganda. It also made sure to send (unofficial) delegations to Buddhist conferences while sponsoring trips for senior members of the Buddhist community to the U.S.

      By 1957, White House policy-makers had produced a general policy framework geared towards the manipulation of Buddhist institutions and monks. The draft was circulated within U.S. embassies across Southeast Asia, and even a special “Buddhist Committee” was formed in the State Department to assist its implementation. By emphasizing community activism, Ford writes that the Asia Foundation’s “aim had been to preserve the monkhood’s traditional abstention from politics by providing alternative forms of civic engagement.” Much like Byoto, the Asia Foundation resembled a foreign agent determined on restructuring Thailand’s cloistered Buddhist institutions.

      As turmoil enveloped Southeast Asia, however, the strategy began to unravel, as forces that were activated failed to align as intended.

      A coup d’état deposed Burma’s U Nu in 1962, and the military junta engaged in a protracted campaign against a local communist insurgency. The repression of Buddhists under the U.S.-supported Catholic leader Ngo Dinh Diem in Vietnam during the “Buddhist Crisis,” and the self-immolation of the monk Quang Duc in 1963, hastened a political crisis that culminated in a military coup, Diem’s assassination, and the further spiraling of South Vietnam into chaos. In 1967, the Asia Foundation’s CIA patronage was exposed in the antiwar journal Ramparts. Eventually, despite U.S. military aid and religious sponsorship, communists took power in Laos and Cambodia in 1975. That same year, Saigon fell to the Viet Cong.

      With the specter of communism at its doorstep, the Thai conservative establishment curbed the postwar experiment of civilian democratic rule in its quest for stability. It achieved this by soliciting the services of a notorious right-wing monk named Kittivudho, who to Ford represented “both the activation and the internationalization of Thai Buddhist conservatism.” By incentivizing the assassination of leftists with accumulation of religious merit, Kittivudho fused Buddhist doctrine with a virulent anti-communism. He lent institutional support to right-wing paramilitary organizations and vigilante groups, as the Thai government (with implicit support from Washington) carried out a brutal crackdown on students, labor activists, and farmers.

      Cold War Monks alerts readers to the ways in which the volatile currents of the Cold War swept up Southeast Asian Buddhism. What was an ultimately unsuccessful effort to draw the monkhood out of its political quietism swiftly mutated into an anti-progressive force, and continued to endure as a dark cloud over the region’s politics in subsequent decades.

      This bloody legacy echoes in the present. It can be detected in the violent response of Thai monks to the Malay Muslim insurgency in the south, a campaign that has many similarities with Myanmar’s clerical-led anti-Muslim 969 movement. Under the pressures exerted by globalization, Buddhism continues to provide a source of legitimacy for nation-states across the region. Its followers are susceptible to battle cries to preserve the faith under the banner of a muscular Buddhist nationalism.

      The termination of the Cold War did not erase the imprint of a more bellicose Buddhism. Only instead of a godless communism, now it is a transnational militant Islam that is envisioned as a threat to Buddhist identity and tradition. This ideological shift just so happens to coincide with the U.S.’s “war on terror,” which has been operationalized to justify the bloody reprisals in Thailand and the pogroms in Myanmar. And the monks are front and center of it all.

  • ND323F's Avatar
    83 posts since Mar '17
    • Originally posted by SG5001C:

      Really? All that is found on GEBiz is:

      Tenderers shall note that the following requirements are criteria for this tender:
      (a) Double deck right hand drive diesel buses
      (b) One entrance and two exits
      (c) Two staircases
      (d) Compliance to Euro 6 emission standards
      (e) Low floor bus interior
      (f) Provision of two (2) wheelchair bays
      Tenderers who do not meet the requirements will NOT be considered for this tender.


      Download the entire tender specs. It is in schedule 1

  • TehJarVu's Avatar
    119,145 posts since Dec '03
  • TehJarVu's Avatar
    119,145 posts since Dec '03
    • jogged/walked for 20 minutes
      not bad for a start!

      had a cup of soya bean drink
      now going to eat apple

  • SMB42P's Avatar
    5,619 posts since Jan '12
    • 210518 (Monday)

      SBST Cameo

      80:
      SBS6067U

      166:
      SBS7341X

      197:
      SBS5036R

       

      SMRT Cameo

      61:
      SMB1633C

      67:
      SG5538X
      SG5852M

      171:
      SG1732C

      172:
      SMB320L

      188:
      SG5586G (ex-perm)
      SG5824U

      190:
      SMB5041J (perm?)
      SG5165M (perm?)
      SG5803E

      300:
      SMB1624D

      301:
      SMB1303E
      SMB1420A

      302:
      TIB1219M
      SMB1390C

      307:
      SMB1502Y (307-307-13)

      308:
      SMB68R

      927:
      SMB1579B (perm?)

      961:
      SMB1548R (961-961-10)

       

      Tower Transit Cameo

      106:
      SMB3532Y
      SMB3553L

      183:
      SBS3373E

      974:
      SG1007M

  • JKYY's Avatar
    712 posts since Oct '17
    • 22/5/18

      SBS CAMEOS

      Unknown Citaro on 25

      SBS8862C on 48 (BNDEP 33)

      Unknown Citaro on 132

      SBS9680D on 153 (HGDEP SP)

      SBS8057K on 156 (BBDEP SP)

      SBS6867C on 159/A (HGDEP 27)

      Unknown B10M Mark IV on 165

      SBS8076E on 166 (BBDEP SP)

      SBS6734C on 170A (BBDEP 151)

      SBS6079K on 186 (BRBP 131/131A*)

       

      SMRT CAMEOS

      SMB1602S on 67 (KJDEP 927)

      SG5760U on 67 (KJDEP SP)

      SMB229T on 167 (AMDEP 857)

      TIB1150B on 169 (AMDEP SP)

      SMB1522P on 169 (AMDEP SP)

      SMB3520G on 169 (AMDEP SP)

      SG1739J on 171 (AMDEP SP)

      SG5452J on 700 (KJDEP SP)

      SMB24S on 853 (AMDEP SP)

      SMB177J on 855 (AMDEP SP)

      Unknown A22 on 855

      Edited by JKYY 22 May `18, 4:39PM
  • JKYY's Avatar
    712 posts since Oct '17
    • ... Balmoral Plaza (>> Buona Vista Ter)] SG5452J on 700 [Balmoral Plaza to Raffles Town Club (>> Bukit Panjang Temp Bus Pk)] SG5328K on 132 [Raffles Town Club to Blk 634 (>> Hougang Ctrl Int)]

      Edited by JKYY 25 May `18, 7:09AM
  • sgbuses's Avatar
    2,406 posts since Nov '05
    • At this rate, trying to track each minor or major design change by batch alone simply makes no sense anymore. The nomenclature has to evolve with MAN/GML/STK too:

      SD configuration:

      • SMB138Y - MAN Lion's City SD (Euro V), MCV eVolution > rebodied to Gemilang Mark I
      • All SMB plated, SG1700U to SG1748H - MAN Lion's City SD (Euro V), Gemilang Mark I
      • SG4002G - MAN Lion's City SD (Euro V, 3 doors), Gemilang Mark II
      • SG1751Y onwards - MAN Lion's City SD (Euro VI), Gemilang Mark III

      DD configuration:

      • SMB5888H - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro V), Gemilang Prototype
      • All SMB plated (except SMB5888H), SG5740C to SG5799J - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro V), Gemilang Mark I
      • SG5999Z - MAN Lion's City DD L (Euro V, 3 doors), Gemilang Mark II
      • SG5800M to SG5829G - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro V), Gemilang Mark II
      • SG5830B to SG5920A - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro V), Gemilang Mark III
      • SG2017C - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro VI), Gemilang Mark III
      • SG5921A onwards - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro VI), Gemilang Mark IV

      Articulated bus configuration:

      • SMB388S, SMB80XX - MAN Lion's City GL, Gemilang Mark I

      Then divide each Mark type by batches separately.

      The number increases by one for each Windows 10 style update to their bodywork (Gemilang Mark V, Gemilang Mark VI, ...Gemilang Mark IX, Gemilang Mark X, etc.). Windows 10 style updates should be expected as the norm, not the exception. Hence we need to allow this nomenclature to scale until at least 2025.

      There is only that many times you can call the design a facelift. You can say the same for ADL Enviro500 MMC too (their "facelift MMC" would similarly be Enviro500 MMC Mk II).

      Yes, the Lion's City brand is applied retrospectively. But the marketing material and technical evidence indicates this is the manufacturer/distributor's intention and this should keep the certain bus lobbyists very happy for decades to come. And there appears to be no strict adherance to the traditional European requirements as well when it comes to naming a Lion's City product, at least if it's not integral anyway.

      As for overseas units (such as Hong Kong and Sydney), you can call them MAN Lion's City if you like. Apply duck test (if it looks like a duck, sounds like a duck, it's a duck). The overseas distributors doesn't seem to mind anyway.

      At this point it is a matter of when, not if, new articulated buses from MAN and Gemilang shows up in the future. We can then call them MAN Lion's City GL (Euro VI), Gemilang Mark II and so on.

  • sgbuses's Avatar
    2,406 posts since Nov '05
    • At this rate, trying to track each minor or major design change by batch alone simply makes no sense anymore. The nomenclature has to evolve with MAN/GML/STK too:

      SD configuration:

      • SMB138Y - MAN Lion's City SD (Euro V), MCV eVolution > rebodied to Gemilang Mark I
      • All SMB plated, SG1700U to SG1748H - MAN Lion's City SD (Euro V), Gemilang Mark I
      • SG4002G - MAN Lion's City SD (Euro V, 3 doors), Gemilang Mark II
      • SG1751Y onwards - MAN Lion's City SD (Euro VI), Gemilang Mark III

      DD configuration:

      • SMB5888H - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro V), Gemilang Prototype
      • All SMB plated (except SMB5888H), SG5740C to SG5799J - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro V), Gemilang Mark I
      • SG5999Z - MAN Lion's City DD L (Euro V), Gemilang Mark II
      • SG5800M to SG5829G - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro V), Gemilang Mark II
      • SG5830B to SG5920A - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro V), Gemilang Mark III
      • SG2017C - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro VI), Gemilang Mark III
      • SG5921A onwards - MAN Lion's City DD (Euro VI), Gemilang Mark IV

      Articulated bus configuration:

      • SMB388S, SMB80XX - MAN Lion's City GL, Gemilang Mark I

      Then divide each Mark type by batches separately.

      The number increases by one for each Windows 10 style update to their bodywork (Gemilang Mark V, Gemilang Mark VI, ...Gemilang Mark IX, Gemilang Mark X, etc.). Windows 10 style updates should be expected as the norm, not the exception. Hence we need to allow this nomenclature to scale until at least 2025.

      There is only that many times you can call the design a facelift. You can say the same for ADL Enviro500 MMC too (their "facelift MMC" would similarly be Enviro500 MMC Mk II).

      Yes, the Lion's City brand is applied retrospectively. But the marketing material and technical evidence indicates this is the manufacturer/distributor's intention and this should keep the certain bus lobbyists very happy for decades to come. And there appears to be no strict adherance to the traditional European requirements as well when it comes to naming a Lion's City product, at least if it's not integral anyway.

      As for overseas units (such as Hong Kong and Sydney), you can call them MAN Lion's City if you like. Apply duck test (if it looks like a duck, sounds like a duck, it's a duck). The overseas distributors doesn't seem to mind anyway.

      At this point it is a matter of when, not if, new articulated buses from MAN and Gemilang shows up in the future. We can then call them MAN Lion's City GL (Euro VI), Gemilang Mark II and so on.

  • DeeCop's Avatar
    1 post since May '18
  • DeeCop's Avatar
    1 post since May '18
    • Most of all I like computer games and fast food. I almost did not leave the house. Now my weight is 70 kilograms, and 2 years ago my weight was 93. I smoked and drank beer almost every day. I read many books on how to lose weight, limited myself to eating, but nothing helped. And then my mom moved with her cats. But it turned out that I have an alegre for wool of cats. I began to walk in the evening in the park, I bought special sneakers for walking with a rounded sole. I bought a new vacuum cleaner. In this I was helped by the resource https://bestvacuum.reviews/shark-vs-dyson. I do not even imagine how people lived without home appliances that make life easier. By the way, losing weight was not my goal. Everything turned out by itself, thanks to mom and cats.  

      Edited by DeeCop 22 May `18, 3:21AM
  • The Code's Avatar
    500 posts since Jul '14
  • Lololo12345kj's Avatar
    2 posts since May '18
    • Those who went for cnb psychometric test on 8may, did u received any calls or rejection email?

  • carbikebus's Avatar
    21,599 posts since Nov '03
    • Originally posted by iveco:

      Are the gas tanks on the B10BLEs nearing expiry? I know some of the Transperth O405NH CNG buses gas tanks recently expired. The OC500LE gas tanks have 20 years on them as they were built using updated technology. 

      Not a matter of gas tanks.

  • TehJarVu's Avatar
    119,145 posts since Dec '03
  • Dmitry.l's Avatar
    167 posts since Apr '17
    • EUR/USD Technical Analysis


      The pair will move down.

      Due to the progress in the negotiations between the US and China, we can assume that the situation is stabilizing. The US dollar continues to strengthen and we see a continuation of the downward movement in our pair.

      More information see here

  • BusAnalayzer's Avatar
    10,660 posts since May '12
    • 972 load towards BPJ road (near BKE) and city is higher than 920 + 922 + 972 combined towards BPJ Interchange.

      The reason I can think of is that people along Senja, Segar, Fajar find it better to use 972 to get to (1) Stevens DTL3 to city (2) Orchard (3) Woodlands via 178, 963, 966 (4) Yishun via 171 (5) PIE/Toa Payoh/St.Andrews/Eunos via 966, (6) 960 to Woodlands road, (7) 184 to Ngee Ann via Pending (8) 171 to Upper Bukit Timah (9) 178 to Boon Lay, Bukit Batok. 

      For (6), (7), (8) people can also use stop at BPJ road near Upper Bukit Timah depending on where they live along ring road. 

      Same observation fellas?

       

  • iveco's Avatar
    17,273 posts since Mar '04
    • Originally posted by carbikebus:

      Eds look like hanover also..

      Most probably 45 units will go to SBST to replace the B10M DM3500 & B10BLE.

      Are the gas tanks on the B10BLEs nearing expiry? I know some of the Transperth O405NH CNG buses gas tanks recently expired. The OC500LE gas tanks have 20 years on them as they were built using updated technology. 

  • carbikebus's Avatar
    21,599 posts since Nov '03
    • Eds look like hanover also..

      Most probably 45 units will go to SBST to replace the B10M DM3500 & B10BLE.

  • carbikebus's Avatar
    21,599 posts since Nov '03
    • Originally posted by SG5001C:

      Really? All that is found on GEBiz is:

      Tenderers shall note that the following requirements are criteria for this tender:
      (a) Double deck right hand drive diesel buses
      (b) One entrance and two exits
      (c) Two staircases
      (d) Compliance to Euro 6 emission standards
      (e) Low floor bus interior
      (f) Provision of two (2) wheelchair bays
      Tenderers who do not meet the requirements will NOT be considered for this tender.

      Hopefully not 13m else so many cases of swingout near miss or worse.

  • carbikebus's Avatar
    21,599 posts since Nov '03
    • Originally posted by SMB315C:

      Based on my observation..

      1 DD will do 922 around 0615+ for one trip, and disappeared.. Probably crossover from 972..

      Meanwhile another DD will do 922 from 1300+ until 1950+..

      And yup only for weekdays.. Weekends no show..

      Probably will stabilise once the Euro6 DD replace the O405Gs.

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    266,170 posts since Dec '99