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    UltimaOnline's Avatar
    11,863 posts since May '05
    • They're both damn good looking for their age, and from what I hear, Tom's a genuinely very nice guy, even if he is somewhat misguided to remain in that Scientology cult, poor guy. And apparently Jolin made the both the sarcophagus and Chinese vampire from scratch all by herself. Crazy impressive edible artwork.

      image

      Edited by UltimaOnline 30 May `17, 1:36AM
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  • qdtimes2's Avatar
    253 posts since Jun '09
    • Originally posted by qdtimes2:

      In case you are misunderstanding, there is no fixed % as to how many people can get 1st class/2nd upper/2nd lower. But there is bell curve for each module, if the class size is large enough (I'd say more than 30 or 40 students). So, in a way, the NTU biz/acct students will face each other in a lot of common modules. 

      I don't know where you got those numbers from but I highly doubt they are legitimate. NTU 3 years programme is also a direct honors programme, and it's already ridiculous to say that 40% chose to drop out of honors when the prize is just right in front of them. If it was too stressful for them, they could have extended 1 more year to complete their honors. 

      To get 1st class honors, you need to have minimum 4.5 CAP/GPA, which is average A-. I reckon that 25% of students get A- and above in a module typically (could be less). 2% seems more like the number of people who gets the A+ grade. The bell curve can be arbituary depending on the class size and prof's likings. In an undesirable scenario, for instance, I have heard that 30% of the people failed (less than grade D) for a certain engineering module in NUS.

      NUS free-grade system is definitely advantageous but keep in mind that you have to take more electives (although who knows maybe you can do well in these modules or even enjoy them).

       

  • qdtimes2's Avatar
    253 posts since Jun '09
    • Originally posted by Bluepop:

      Great help from you! I guessed its rly true that employer focus more on CGPA as we usually put them in our resume..

      This makes me rethink if the grade free system under NUS will helped me more in the future when looking for a job (in the long run) due to the seemingly higher chance of getting a better CGPA although im still definitely attracted to the 3 year direct honour offered in NTU bcos of the faster route and its specific degree rather than a general one

      Just one concern regarding the % of students who can graduate with a first class, second upper class and second lower class honour, pass with merit as well as only a pass with just a normal degree (is it true if CGPA below 3.0, u will not get the honour in NTU acct?) Seen somewhr that arnd 40% (arnd 250 ppl?) of the NTU Acct graduate only managed to get a normal degree (w/o honour) whereas only 2% (arnd less than 15 ppl?) managed to obtain a first class honour. Is it rly that competitive? If thats the case isnt NUS a btr choice now with its direct honour as well as their free grading system although it was said to focus alot on class participation, projects etc (which some could choose to ignore the importance and S/U it if the overall result turns out bad)?

      In case you are misunderstanding, there is no fixed % as to how many people can get 1st class/2nd upper/2nd lower. But there is bell curve for each module, if the class size is large enough (I'd say more than 30 or 40 students). So, in a way, the NTU biz/acct students will face each other in a lot of common modules. 

      I don't know where you got those numbers from but I highly doubt they are legitimate. NTU 3 years programme is also a direct honors programme, and it's already ridiculous to say that 40% chose to drop out of honors when the prize is just right in front of them. If it was too stressful for them, they could have extended 1 more year to complete their honors. 

      To get 1st class honors, you need to have minimum 4.5 CAP/GPA, which is average A-. I reckon that 25% of students get A- and above in a module typically (could be less). 2% seems more like the number of people who gets the A+ grade.

      NUS free-grade system is definitely advantageous but keep in mind that you have to take more electives (although who knows maybe you can do well in these modules or even enjoy them).

      Edited by qdtimes2 29 May `17, 11:56PM
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  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    262,420 posts since Dec '99
    • Common myths about making a will that we need to stop believing now

       

      Myth 1: Making a will is expensive and only for rich people.

      Most people only require a simple will that will cost a few hundred dollars to have a professional draft for them. Many people in Singapore are “asset rich but cash poor”. While they may not have large amounts of ready cash at their disposal, many people in Singapore are putting away money towards their home, which alone is often worth at least half a million dollars in today’s prices, and likely to increase over the years. It only takes a small investment to ensure that your assets (which may number in the millions in a couple of years) are properly distributed after you are gone.

       

      Myth 2: I will just leave everything to my spouse

      That’s fine most of the time, but what happens if your spouse passes on before you? Or if you both pass on together (such as during a car accident). What if at some point your spouse remarries, or has children or step-children with another partner? By making out a will you can ensure that your estate is distributed in the way that you want, to protect the legacy that you leave behind, in a way that does not disadvantage your spouse. Another important aspect of your will would be to designate a guardian for your children if they are still minors when you pass on.

       

      Myth 3: My family will sort out my estate for me

      If a person passes on without a will, in Singapore the Intestate Succession Act (the “Act”) will apply, but only to provide for default and very general rules as to how a person’s estate shall be distributed. For example, under the Act, siblings often do not receive any portion of an estate unless the person passed on without being survived by any spouse, parents, or issue. In addition, there is an issue of appointing an administrator of the estate. Since there is more than one person who will be eligible to administer your estate under the Act, disputes may arise between beneficiaries as to who should administer your estate.

       

      Myth 4: I’m still young and don’t need a will

      The reality is, we will never know for sure when and how we will pass on. In the absence of a will, issues such as the appointment of guardians, and distribution of monies may take many months, sometimes years if there is lengthy litigation, to resolve. In the meantime, life for our loved ones such as young children are severely disrupted especially if they have no means of supporting themselves in the meantime.

       

      Myth 5: Executors cannot be beneficiaries in a will

      There are no restrictions at law in appointing a beneficiary of your will to be an executor as well.

       

      Myth 6: A will and its contents remain private forever

      Although it is recommended that you keep the contents of your will private and confidential, eventually its contents will be made public upon your passing. This is because probate is a public legal proceeding, the details of your estate may be publicly accessed by practically anyone. Including busybody neighbours and companies looking to sell your beneficiaries products and services. They can find out things such as the balance in your savings account, the properties you own, and the like. If you are interested in exploring possibilities in keeping your private affairs confidential, do consider speaking to a competent estate planning lawyer.

       

      yahoo

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  • Bluepop's Avatar
    19 posts since Mar '14
    • Originally posted by qdtimes2:

      There is almost no preference in employment aspects between NUS and NTU biz/acct grad.

      -----

      1) I'm not a NUS biz/acct student so I'm not sure if they pre-allocate core modules for NUS biz/acct students. Even if there is no pre-allocation, the priority of vacancies go to them. Final resort is appealing, which is typically successfully since they are your core modules. It follows that if there is no pre-allocation, you will have to plan when you want to take these core modules; but it's typical that there is no much space for you to be flexible mainly because the core modules are typically pre-requisites to the higher elective modules (so you have to take in year 1 and year 2 accordingly, and to which one of the semester they are offered). It's better to ask a senior if your gf is joining the orientation camp.

      If you are outbidded for a non-core module: most likely too bad. Sometimes, you can expect a successful bidder to drop the module and you can replace this person in Round 3. Final resort: appeal. Appeal likely fails if the class truly has no vacancies left (by means of lecture seats, tutorial slots and available tutors). 

      2) NUS Direct honors simply that you automatically enrolled to the honors programme in the 4th year regardless of your grades, same as to Computing and Engineering students. Science students have a minimum CAP to meet if they want to do honors. For Arts students, honors programme is also optional for their 4th year. If you are really looking forward to completing honors in 3 years, you can study like crazy and take extra modules for a few semesters and find those that fit into the timetable.

      3) These days, an honors degree is still more valued. For some jobs, especially in the government sector, the starting pay, pay increment and promotion opportunities are determined by honors->2nd upper/1st class -> 2nd lower. However, if the non-honors route is chosen, it is more economic if you do still find a good job, or if you cannot tolerate the student life than working life.

      4) I cannot answer for this one. 

      5) Neither have I experience for their workload. But I do know that their lessons, tutorials can take up only 2 days in a week if they plan properly. In exchange, they allocate some of the remaining time for project work. NUS seems to have slightly higher emphasis on projects/participations/presentations. Ultimately, I don't know which is harder for NTU or NUS.

      6) Grade-free is optional. You get an A, you keep the A. If you are unhappy with a B+, you simply choose not to keep it. SEP indeed does gives them another semester of free grades. AKA total 3 semesters + 3 non-prerequisite modules of free grade, out of 8 semesters. This is a convenient way of retaining CAP. Many employers don't really look at your transcript anyway (they look at the CAP still), unless you fail a module, or unless you are applying for an academia job.

      job.

      Great help from you! I guessed its rly true that employer focus more on CGPA as we usually put them in our resume..

      This makes me rethink if the grade free system under NUS will helped me more in the future when looking for a job (in the long run) due to the seemingly higher chance of getting a better CGPA although im still definitely attracted to the 3 year direct honour offered in NTU bcos of the faster route and its specific degree rather than a general one

      Just one concern regarding the % of students who can graduate with a first class, second upper class and second lower class honour, pass with merit as well as only a pass with just a normal degree (is it true if CGPA below 3.0, u will not get the honour in NTU acct?) Seen somewhr that arnd 40% (arnd 250 ppl?) of the NTU Acct graduate only managed to get a normal degree (w/o honour) whereas only 2% (arnd less than 15 ppl?) managed to obtain a first class honour. Is it rly that competitive? If thats the case isnt NUS a btr choice now with its direct honour as well as their free grading system although it was said to focus alot on class participation, projects etc (which some could choose to ignore the importance and S/U it if the overall result turns out bad)?

      Edited by Bluepop 29 May `17, 9:36PM
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    • 29th May 2017

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