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  • laurence82's Avatar
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    5 posts since Jan '18
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    H2 Chemistry @ BedokFunland JC (near VJC & TJC)
    UltimaOnline's Avatar
    14,460 posts since May '05
    • Originally posted by paimong:

      i am having a hard time considering if i should go to jc or MI

      Heres my O'level results: L1r5 17, L1r4 12

       Eng C5, C.Humanities(ss+hist) C5, H.chinese B4, Chinese A1 A.math B3, E.math A1, Bio A2, Chem B3

      I'm thinking of going to MI because if i think i need at least 3 years to improve my english and be better at my science subjects.

      But my parents would like me to go to Jc because they think the environment in Jc would motivate me study harder (dad: tchers n students in jc give a better study environment/ Mom: you would/may relax/slack, thinking that you hv 3 years, in the end, not being able to achieve anything great)

      i know its very last minute, but, PLS help me, any advice or suggestions? 


      Go to the nearest JC to your home that your L1R5 allows you to go, because you'll need as much sleep as you can. Sleep deprivation (which inflicts 90% of JC students, who fail to get 8 hours of sleep a day) causes cumulative brain damage and significantly lowers your IQ and hence your A level results.

      Distance is thus the most important factor in choosing a JC. Go to the nearest best JC your L1R5 allows you to go.

      As for needing 3 years to prepare yourself for the A levels, you can always retake A levels as a private candidate if necessary after 2 years in JC (and even if you have NS, you can retake your private A levels after you ORD no worries). Private candidates get enough sleep, which will boost your chances of better A level results.

  • Jackreacher8's Avatar
    5 posts since Jan '18
    • not really i think mustafi underperforms alot while monreal isnt magnificent or anything compared to the other LBs

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
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  • Queen of sgForums
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    FireIce's Avatar
    264,976 posts since Dec '99
    • S’pore-Johor RTS a channel to ‘work and play’ for travellers. “(It will) provide a convenient means for the Johoreans to come to Singapore to work and to play. And Singaporeans will go to Johor to study, to work, to shop," said PM Lee Hsien Loong. https://tdy.sg/2ENdGaD 

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  • Queen of sgForums
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    FireIce's Avatar
    264,976 posts since Dec '99
    • 5 More Things You Should Do in 2018 to Improve Your Finances

       

      Was “save more money” on your to-do list in 2017? If so, it’s probably still going to be there in 2018.

      Coming up with very specific, easy-to-satisfy resolutions (transfer $x to a savings account at the beginning of every month) is a lot more effective than inventing a big, vague one you have no idea how to fulfil (like “become a billionaire”).

      So here are five simple things you should commit to doing in 2018 that will put you in better financial health.

       

      Cancel credit cards you no longer use

      The world of credit cards is a fickle one. One day, your favourite credit card is rewarding you with 8% cashback on everything you could possibly buy. The next day, they’ve revamped their entire benefits programme, slapped on a minimum spending requirement that’s more than you earn in a month, and the card is now even less useful than those coasters you received from your Secret Santa at the office.

      If a card no longer serves your purposes, cancel it immediately. You might think there’s no harm in letting it lie innocuously in your wallet. But the longer you let that piece of plastic stick around, the more likely you are to get charged annual fees unknowingly (and even pay them, if you’re paying by Interbank GIRO) or fall prey to credit card fraud.

       

      Search for new credit cards to sign up for

      Just as your formerly favourite credit cards may no longer be useful to you, new ones will have been released or modified, and might now be perfect for your current spending habits.

      The New Year is a great time to retire those cards you no longer use, and sign up for news ones that are going to be your go-to cards for 2018.

      So look through MoneySmart’s credit card guides to find the best credit cards for shoppingdiningentertainmentgroceriesonline shoppingcash backair milesrewards and petrol.

       

      Check that you’re properly insured

      If you’ve already got some form of insurance, you probably bought your policies years ago. In 2018, it’s time to review your insurance policies to see if they’re still serving you well, and to make sure you’re adequately insured based on where you are in life right now.

      For instance, as a young working adult, you might already have purchased medical insurance. But if you are now slightly less young, married and expecting your first child, you should definitely be considering life insurance as well. If you’ve never properly compared your current health insurance plan with offerings from other companies, you can now do so easily right here on MoneySmart.

       

      Check if it’s time to refinance your home loan

      If it’s been a few years since you signed up for your home loan, it’s likely your interest rate is no longer very competitive. Refinancing your home loan means switching to a loan with a more attractive interest rate, thereby saving you money.

      Will 2018 will be the year you should refinance your home loan? Use MoneySmart’s refinancing wizard to find out.

       

      Consolidate your bank accounts

      Over the years, you might have opened various bank accounts and later abandoned them, leaving a bit of money in each so you wouldn’t have to pay fall-below fees.

      This year, it’s time to consolidate all your bank accounts. That means you’ll be withdrawing the cash in all the accounts you no longer wish to keep, closing those accounts and depositing the money in the one(s) you want to continue using.

      But which bank account should you be using? For the bulk of your cash savings, it’s a good idea to look for a high interest savings account that rewards you a bit more for storing your cash in there.

      If this is not an account you should be withdrawing money from (some high interest savings accounts will reward you more handsomely if you don’t make withdrawals), you’ll want to maintain a second account that offers access to a decent distribution of ATM machines.

  • Queen of sgForums
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    FireIce's Avatar
    264,976 posts since Dec '99
    • More sunny days ahead as unusual period of cool weather ends  

       

      Pack your jackets and sweaters away. The unusually cool weather in the first two weeks of the year is over, and you can expect more sunny days in the second half of January.

      Temperatures could go as high as 32°C, the Meteorological Service Singapore (MSS) said in a weather update on Wednesday (Jan 17).

      While the prevailing North-east Monsoon is expected to continue, the next two weeks will not be as wet as the first fortnight of the year, the MSS added.

      Still, short-duration thundery showers can be expected in the afternoon on five to seven days during the last two weeks of January. On a few of these days, the thundery showers could extend into the evening.

      Rainfall for January is expected to be "well above normal".

      While daily temperatures are likely to be in the range of 24°C to 32°C, it can drop to as low as 23°C on rainy days.

      Reviewing the weather pattern in the first half of January, the MSS said rain fell over the island almost every day, receiving "significantly above normal rainfall".

      The highest rainfall of 339.4 mm (206 per cent above average) was recorded at Paya Lebar. Rainfall was lowest around the Bukit Panjang area where 162.5mm (44 per cent above average) was recorded.

      The highest total daily rainfall recorded in January was 131.8mm at Paya Lebar.

      The first half of January also saw temperatures dipping to as low as 21.2°C, which was recorded on Jan 14 at Admiralty and Jurong West. The highest temperature recorded for this period was 33.2°C.

  • Cviewed's Avatar
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  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    264,976 posts since Dec '99
  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    264,976 posts since Dec '99
    • Here comes Singapore’s first mountain-bike sharing service

      Just when you thought Singapore’s had enough bike sharing services to go around, another one pops up. But this one’s a little different—instead of offering bikes to use in urban areas and neighborhoods like the five other services, these guys have set themselves apart by offering mountain bikes. Meet ShareBikeSG, Singapore's only mountain bike-sharing service.

      The company was born out of pure passion by the owner of Aire MTB, a little shed over at Chestnut Nature Park which offers mountain bicycle rentals to anyone who’s up for a little adventure. With the arrival of bike-sharing services since last year, 30-year-old Ethan Tan decided to snuff out the competition by starting this bike-sharing service to bring convenience to those who want to ride in the park. Unlike the conventional bikes used from other services, these come with front suspension and seven gears; good for off-road riding in parks and biking trails (Chestnut Nature Park itself has a trail stretching more than 8km).

      At the moment, there are only 300 bikes to go around and are currently located at places like Chestnut Nature Park, Gardens by the Bay and Marina Barrage. The frames of each of these bikes were designed by Tan himself, just like the ones being rented out at Aire MTB. It’s also fuss-free to rent—the ShareBikeSG uses an app available on the Apple App Store and Google Play. All you need to do is pay a refundable deposit of $9.90 (only until Jan 31; usual price $49), find a bike on the app, scan the QR code on the bike to unlock and you’re good to go. The rental prices are pretty competitive too ($1 for every half an hour), so bike to it. 

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    264,976 posts since Dec '99
    • still quite cool........

       

      later go 马杀鸡
      and need collect package from singpost
      need buy something from bookstore

       

      小忙............

      Edited by FireIce 17 Jan `18, 11:40AM
  • Queen of sgForums
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    FireIce's Avatar
    264,976 posts since Dec '99
  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    264,976 posts since Dec '99
  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    264,976 posts since Dec '99
  • paimong's Avatar
    10 posts since Jan '18
    • i am having a hard time considering if i should go to jc or MI

      Heres my O'level results: L1r5 17, L1r4 12

       Eng C5, C.Humanities(ss+hist) C5, H.chinese B4, Chinese A1 A.math B3, E.math A1, Bio A2, Chem B3

      I'm thinking of going to MI because if i think i need at least 3 years to improve my english and be better at my science subjects.

      But my parents would like me to go to Jc because they think the environment in Jc would motivate me study harder (dad: tchers n students in jc give a better study environment/ Mom: you would/may relax/slack, thinking that you hv 3 years, in the end, not being able to achieve anything great)

      i know its very last minute, but, PLS help me, any advice or suggestions? 

  • paimong's Avatar
    10 posts since Jan '18
  • paimong's Avatar
    10 posts since Jan '18
  • paimong's Avatar
    10 posts since Jan '18
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    6,166 posts since Feb '05
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    Aik TC's Avatar
    1,596 posts since Jun '10
    • The fate of the Buddha’s begging bowl

      November 17, 2017, Bhante Dhammika The Island

      One of the most revered relics in the ancient Buddhist world was the Buddha’s begging bowl. A rough outline of its long convoluted history is this – it was supposedly given to the people of Vesali by the Buddha when he passed through the city on his way to Kusinara. In the 1st/2nd century King Kanishka took it to Pushapura, now Peshawar, where a string of Chinese pilgrims reported seeing it between the 3rd and the 9th centuries. The importance of the bowl is attested by numerous depictions of it in Gandhara art, usually shown on the pedestal of Buddha statues. During the Islamic period it was taken from one palace or mosque to another until at a date unknown it ended up in Sultan Way’s Baba’s shrine on the outskirts of Kandahar Afghanistan. Several British officers report seeing it there in the 19th century, one attempting to translate the inscription on it, and another, Alexander Cunningham, trying to trace its history, a fact I mention in my Middle Land Middle Way (1992, p.136). In the late 1980s during Afghanistan’s civil war President Najibullah had the bowl taken to Kabul’s National Museum. When the Taliban came to power, their Minister of Culture ordered all Buddhist artefacts in the museum smashed although the bowl remained undamaged, no doubt because of the Quranic verses inscribed on its outer surface. Today it can still be seen in the museum.

      The bowl is not small. It is a stone hemispherical vessel of greenish-grey granite with a diameter of about 1.75 meters, a height of about three ¾ of a meter, and a thickness of about 18 cm at its rim, rather thicker elsewhere particularly at its middle and the base. It has no cracks or abrasions, except for a portion about the size of the palm of one’s hand that has flaked away from near the rim. There is a delicate lotus petal design chiselled around its base, attesting to its Buddhist past, and inscribed in beautiful large calligraphic script horizontally along the rim of the bowl, are six rows of verses from the Quran, reflecting its Islamic continuum and its status through the ages as an object of special religious interest. Traces of similar calligraphic script are visible on the surface on the inner side of the bowl. The bowl is about 350 to 400 kg in weigh, far too heavy to lift.

      This bowl was probably an early larger copy of the Buddha’s actual bowl placed in a monastery in Vesali for people to offer their first fruits in, a custom common in ancient India and which survived even in Sri Lanka and elsewhere up to the 19th century. The bowl’s great size may well have encouraged the acceptance of the widespread belief amongst ancient Buddhists that the Buddha was 18 feet tall. Only someone that big could have used or even lifted a bowl this size.

      It is interesting to keep in mind that Sri Lanka claimed to have the Buddha’s begging bowl, although any legend of how it got to the island has not been preserved. This Sri Lankan relic is mentioned several times in the Culavamsa as being as precious and holy as the Tooth Relic. The chronical tells us for instance, that when King Manabharana moved from Rohana to Polonnaruva he brought the Tooth Relic and the Bowl Relic with him. It also gives us a description of an elaborate ceremony during the reign of Parakramabahu I in which the two relics were drawn through the streets of the capital in a wheeled pavilion made of gold. Sometime after the fall of Polonnaruva the Bowl Relic disappeared and was forgotten

      I am writing about the Buddha’s begging bowl because after being in obscurity for so long it recently hit the headlines in India when it was mentioned in the Lok Sabha, India’s parliament. I reproduce below from the Ministry of External Affairs website. "MP Dr. Raghuvansh Prasad Singh asked; ‘Will the Minister of External Affairs be pleased to state: (a) whether the Government has recently got the information that the begging bowl of Buddha, given to the people of Vesali by him, has been found in the Kabul museum; (b) if so, the details thereof; (c) whether the Indian Embassy in Afghanistan has sent a photo of the said bowl to the Government; (d) if so, the details thereof; (e) whether the Government has initiated the process to recover the said bowl; (f) if so, the details thereof; (g) whether the travelogues of the Chinese pilgrim Faxian and the writings of Dr. Cunningham and Shri S.V. Sahni mention the said bowl; and (h) if so, the details thereof?’."

       

      The Minister Prenteet Kaur in reply answered; "The Embassy of India, Kabul has made enquiries in the matter. It is learnt that the item purported to be Lord Buddha’s begging bowl was apparently in Kandahar until the regime of former President Najibullah. It was later brought to Kabul and is currently in the Kabul Museum. It has been pointed out that the begging bowl, a photo of which our Embassy has obtained, is rather large, besides having inscription in Arabic and Persian, thus calling into question its provenance. The Archaeological Survey of India has been requested to convey any information or advice it may have regarding the provenance of the bowl currently in Kabul Museum."