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  • qdtimes2's Avatar
    253 posts since Jun '09
    • There is almost no preference in employment aspects between NUS and NTU biz/acct grad.

      -----

      1) I'm not a NUS biz/acct student so I'm not sure if they pre-allocate core modules for NUS biz/acct students. Even if there is no pre-allocation, the priority of vacancies go to them. Final resort is appealing, which is typically successfully since they are your core modules. It follows that if there is no pre-allocation, you will have to plan when you want to take these core modules; but it's typical that there is no much space for you to be flexible mainly because the core modules are typically pre-requisites to the higher elective modules (so you have to take in year 1 and year 2 accordingly, and to which one of the semester they are offered). It's better to ask a senior if your gf is joining the orientation camp.

      If you are outbidded for a non-core module: most likely too bad. Sometimes, you can expect a successful bidder to drop the module and you can replace this person in Round 3. Final resort: appeal. Appeal likely fails if the class truly has no vacancies left (by means of lecture seats, tutorial slots and available tutors). 

      2) NUS Direct honors simply that you automatically enrolled to the honors programme in the 4th year regardless of your grades, same as to Computing and Engineering students. Science students have a minimum CAP to meet if they want to do honors. For Arts students, honors programme is also optional for their 4th year. If you are really looking forward to completing honors in 3 years, you can study like crazy and take extra modules for a few semesters and find those that fit into the timetable.

      3) These days, an honors degree is still more valued. For some jobs, especially in the government sector, the starting pay, pay increment and promotion opportunities are determined by honors->2nd upper/1st class -> 2nd lower. However, if the non-honors route is chosen, it is more economic if you do still find a good job, or if you cannot tolerate the student life than working life.

      4) I cannot answer for this one. 

      5) Neither have I experience for their workload. But I do know that their lessons, tutorials can take up only 2 days in a week if they plan properly. In exchange, they allocate some of the remaining time for project work. NUS seems to have slightly higher emphasis on projects/participations/presentations. Ultimately, I don't know which is harder for NTU or NUS.

      6) Grade-free is optional. You get an A, you keep the A. If you are unhappy with a B+, you simply choose not to keep it. SEP indeed does gives them another semester of free grades. AKA total 3 semesters + 3 non-prerequisite modules of free grade, out of 8 semesters. This is a convenient way of retaining CAP. Many employers don't really look at your transcript anyway (they look at the CAP still), unless you fail a module, or unless you are applying for an academia job.

      Edited by qdtimes2 29 May `17, 1:33PM
  • TehJarVu's Avatar
    116,282 posts since Dec '03
  • ladykirvin's Avatar
    425 posts since Jun '05
    • I started engaging LOA product and services since a decade ago and would like to share my feedback with everyone here:

      1. Tarot Reading - the one hour reading session left me enlightened and he was able to tell me things that I had never disclosed to anyone before. To add on, the ability to read beyond the surface gave me further insights to my current situation and also options to improve the overall situation.

      2. LOA Water and Cleansing Candles – LOA Water is one of the miracle items I have witnessed. Just 3 sprays on myself and I feel cleansed and the negativity is just “gone” and removed from me. My partner once had an unpleasant work situation and got into a big conflict with the management, I told him to use the LOA water and indeed, when he went back to work the next day, it was as if the conflict never occurred. 

      Cleansing Candle is a new product that was introduced to me recently, I used at home and at workplace.  It attracts positivity and has cleansing effect - I feel more at peace, refreshed and lighten up after each use.

      I would strongly recommend to any friends out there to give LOA a try and you will be amazed at its results.


  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    262,420 posts since Dec '99
    • Earlier this month, online news of Nanyang Girls’ High School’s successful implementation of starting school 45 minutes later reached close to half a million page views within a day.

      The change, implemented almost a year ago,was mostly well received but few people realise how remarkable it was to pull off.

      The move to start at 8:15AM came after careful deliberation. Implementing a later start time in a secondary school makes sense as these students are the ones affected by a biological shift in preference for later bedtimes.

      Local data shows a 1 to 1.5 hour delay in sleep time takes place between the ages of 14 and 16 years. So forcing them to sleep at 10pm is not a fact-based solution.

      A 45-minute delay in school start time makes it more likely that the time will actually be used for sleep (an average of 20 minutes so far in the Nanyang case), thus making the benefits outweigh the costs.

      A similar initiative was carried out in Hong Kong but the delay in start time was only 15 minutes, and the corresponding gain in sleep was only three minutes.

      Starting later than 8.15 am would be ideal but this could exacerbate concerns about students using public transportation at the same time as office workers. The leaders at Nanyang did not change the school’s start times on a whim. They reviewed the supporting scientific evidence pointing to the importance of adequate sleep for memory consolidation, health, mental wellbeing and accident reduction in students.

      The school administraion considered these potential gains as well as obstacles, including the impact on traffic and student transport. They engaged students, parents and teachers in discussions, carefully getting students to internalise the benefits of sleeping better. To end school at the same time as before, the curriculum was adjusted after much deliberation.

      The process was not plain sailing. Naysayers constantly reminded us of how impractical and disruptive this would be in Singapore despite objective information being provided about the need for change.

      Nanyang Girls High School chose to press on. Data gathered from two teams in Duke-NUS Medical School shows that our secondary school students and undergraduates sleep one to two hours less than their Australian and United Kingdom counterparts. It was high time that someone went beyond commenting and acted on the science to help students flourish.

      SLEEP QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE

      As far as we can tell, most parents are supportive of their children starting school later. Yet there is a need to address the concerns of those who are against the idea by spelling out the facts.

      First, some people just need less sleep than recommended and can flourish without adverse consequences. Some are larks, whose natural preference is to sleep early and rise early.

      But clearly, not everyone else should be held to these standards.

      To those who say ‘we toughed it out, why can’t the present generation’ I would say we need to adapt to a changing world and that optimising sleep seeks to give Singaporeans a competitive edge in Asia.

      Adequate sleep has benefits. Advocating sleep should be an offensive, not a defensive move. For example, at least one European soccer team is providing comfortable rooms for their players to sleep in the afternoon before playing to enhance night-time game performance. If parents are willing to invest heavily on private tuition, doesn’t improving sleep make sense?

      It is not enough to work hard. Working smarter is what we need to get better at. Surviving isn’t good enough, flourishing is what the next generation must aspire to. Allocating downtime to rest, reflect and sleep will not create lazy people. Instead, it is intended to increase productivity and work intensity during worktime.

      Despite numerous medical studies supporting links between short sleep duration and diabetes, obesity, and the metabolic syndrome, many doctors are largely unaware or indifferent to these findings.

      The focus of medicine in Singapore is on screening, early diagnosis, early and cost-effective treatment, not prevention. As such, there is widespread ignorance of well-established facts like the mid-adolescent shift in preference for later sleep times and its subsequent reversal in early adulthood. One doctor has even gone on record to say that sleeping less on weekdays and catching up on weekends is fine, it is not. This sleeping pattern is associated with increased risk of obesity and diabetes mellitus.

      To argue that adjustments in transportation to accommodate a later school start time are too difficult is tantamount to devaluing the health and wellbeing of the next generation.

      Even the IT and finance industries, two strong supporters of the notion that one can always work harder for profit, are realising that karōshi, the Japanese word for death from overwork, is real.

      Mr Ranjan Das, one of India’s youngest CEOs died at age 42 from a cardiac arrest; many attribute short sleep as a contributory factor. Mr Zhang Rui, founder of Chunyu Doctor, suffered a similar fate, possibly a consequence of a ‘996 schedule’ – 9 am to 9 pm, 6 days a week + loads of stress.

      Mr Sarvshreshth Gupta, a trader in Goldman Sachs was only 22 when he took his own life, unable to cope with stress at work and lack of sleep.

      Lack of sleep is not a badge of honour.

      Having adequate sleep is a public health issue and no less important than eating right and exercising sufficiently.

      Starting school later may not be for every school at the present time. However, it is critical to start the conversation within families, office tea rooms and board rooms about optimising sleep and time-use, followed by personal commitment to action.

      The success of Nanyang against conventional wisdom should prove infectious. One school defied the odds and changed for the better. Others can learn and transform lives in a way best suited to their students’ needs.

      For the sake for our young and vulnerable citizens, I hope this thought will be consolidated the next time Singapore goes to bed.

       

      todayonline

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    262,420 posts since Dec '99
    • Is Singapore ready to become a pro-cycling nation?

      Experts said cyclists, pedestrians and motorists must behave responsibly and graciously if the plans, announced yesterday by the Land Transport Authority and Urban Redevelopment Authority, to make the city centre car-lite are to work well. (See report on right.)

      MP Sitoh Yih Pin, chairman of the Government Parliamentary Committee for Transport, told The New Paper: "The infrastructure put in place can only facilitate the different road users in their travels.

      "It is extremely important that all road users exercise caution and always put safety for themselves and other road users as the top priority."

      Safe Cycling Task Force president Steven Limhas received many complaints about cyclists hogging the Changi East on-road cycling lanes, opened in April, making it hard for faster cyclists to overtake them.

      "This is an example that shows even cyclists, who have been asking for dedicated cycling infrastructure, need to be more responsible and better behaved on the road.

      "If motorists or cyclists have the mindset to look out for others on the roads, we don't need all these infrastructure in the first place," he said.

      Founder of Singapore Bike School, the only cycling instruction school here, Mr Kenneth Wee, said education is important and suggested schools teach cycling.

      "It could be one of the core sports offered, and from there, teach road safety and other aspects of cycling.

      "We could also have more initiatives and educational courses reaching out to the foreign workers, many of whom get around by bike, at their dormitories," he said.

      Mr Gopinath Menon, transport consultant and senior research fellow at the Nanyang Technological University, agreed that providing cycling infrastructure needs to be in tandem with educating Singaporeans onriding practices.

      He said although the LTA has put up a code of conduct on its website, there are still many cases of bad behaviour.

      TODDLER HURT

      For example, two weeks ago, a 13-month-old toddler broke her right leg when a cyclist rode into her grandmother, who was carrying her, outside a Pasir Ris condominium.

      Avid cyclist of five years Peter Sng, 65, a retiree, said cyclists must start to build a culture of graciousness, "but we have a long way to go".

      The LTA will be calling a tender in the coming months for firms to design and construct the proposed central area cycling network, which does not have a targeted completion date yet.

      Making more connections

      The car-lite plan includes:

      • Connecting a revitalised Bencoolen Street, which has been spruced up with a cycling path and more than 125 bicycle parking lots, to existing and future cycling routes all over Singapore.
      • This includes Queenstown, Bishan and the North-South corridor in the north and the central area cycling network in the city, which will in turn be linked to the Marina Bay area and the eastern part of Singapore via East Coast Park.
      • Works to transform Coleman Street, Armenian Street and Waterloo Street to make walking and cycling there more enjoyable by 2020.

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    262,420 posts since Dec '99
    • 1st!


      tong tong die where liao ya...............






      waiting for my lunch delivery............

  • jessi301's Avatar
    1 post since May '17
  • SMB128B's Avatar
    4,815 posts since May '11
    • Originally posted by BusAnalayzer:

      Has BCM reduced bus bunching as they claimed? I think bus bunching issue still continues in a big way especially for feeders/intratowns it has become worse.

      Not rly.. Becoz bunching is mostly caused by on ground conditions which is beyond their control..

  • Grapemedia's Avatar
    4 posts since May '17
  • Grapemedia's Avatar
    4 posts since May '17
  • Grapemedia's Avatar
    4 posts since May '17
  • Grapemedia's Avatar
    4 posts since May '17
  • Moderator
    Aik TC's Avatar
    1,456 posts since Jun '10
    • The Death Penalty in South Asia

      Jivesh Jha May 18, 2017 The Diplomat

      Nepal, Bhutan, and Sri Lanka have effectively abolished capital punishment. The rest of South Asia hasn’t. 

      “Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgment.” So wrote English author JRR Tolkein in his popular Lord of the Rings series. India’s Mahatma Gandhi put it this way: “An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind.”

      Although much of the world has come around to a similar view — that one killing cannot be avenged with another — most South Asian states maintain a fondness for capital punishment, with Nepal, Bhutan and Sri Lanka as the exceptions.

      The constitutions of Nepal (Article 16), and Bhutan (Article 7-18) both prohibit the death penalty. Interestingly, though the death penalty has a legal foundation in Sri Lanka there have been no executions in the Buddhist state since 1976. Legal practice shows that the state has moved a step toward abolition, following the global trend.

      Conversely, the South Asian states of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Maldives, and Pakistan all firmly believe that the death penalty can deter people with evil intent. In this context, the Indian legal system fails to buy into the words of Gandhi, who is considered to be Bapu (founding father) of the world’s largest democracy.

      The Indian Penal Code (IPC)-1860 (amended in 2013) prescribes the death penalty for as many as 11 offenses, including waging war against the government, abetting mutiny by a member of the armed forces, acid attack, murder, rape, and criminal conspiracy. Similar legal frameworks for the death penalty (save for acid attack) have been provisioned under the Bangladesh Penal Code.

      In Pakistan, capital punishment is provisioned for no less than 27 different offenses, to include blasphemy, sexual intercourse outside of marriage, outraging the modesty of a woman, and smuggling drugs.

      In Afghanistan, various crimes — murder, apostasy, homosexuality, rape, terrorism, drug trafficking, adultery, treason, or desertion — are punishable by death based on Islamic jurisprudence. The Maldivian legal position on the death penalty is similar to Afghanistan’s.

      Generally, an accused merits the fate of legal death in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Maldives, and Afghanistan when the crimes committed meet the threshold of “most serious crimes.” Blasphemy, adultery, or drug trafficking do not necessarily meet the threshold of “most serious crimes” but are still punishable by death in Pakistan and many other Islamic countries, including Maldives and Afghanistan.

      India’s Supreme Court, in the landmark case of Bachan Singh vs.State of Punjab (1980), forwarded the doctrine of “rarest of rare,” arguing that life imprisonment is the rule while a death sentence is the exception. The top court held that the death penalty could be imposed “when [society’s] collective conscience is so shocked that it will expect the holders of the judicial power center to inflict death penalty irrespective of their personal opinion as regards desirability or otherwise of retaining death penalty.”

      Even though there is no statutory definition of “rarest of the rare” cases, its widely believed that the pre-planned, brutal, cold-blooded, and sordid nature of a crime, without giving any chance to the victim, is taken into consideration to decide whether a particular case falls within the purview of “rarest of the rare.” India’s Supreme Court recently used this metric to award the death penalty to the accused in a high-profile 2012 gang-rape case.

      The “collective conscience” metric for awarding the death penalty is problematic. If a judge feels that the collective conscience is so shocked that it’s desirable to inflict the death penalty on the accused, then can he or she hear the case entirely on merit? Will the judge ensure a fair trial and presume the accused innocent until proven guilty?

      Additionally, in the 21st century world we live in — fully equipped with 24-hour TV and social media on tap — outrage can be manufactured and reality can be distorted.

      “The collective conscience doctrine is not a very clear-cut concept and its in want of a healthy debate in India,” opines Dr. Nidhi Saxena, a faculty member in international law at Sikkim Central University, India. She adds that the judicial pronouncements may not address the collective conscience, as public participation was not ensured in the entire decision making process.

      Beyond the specific issues with the “collective conscience” rule, many believe that the taking of a life by the judiciary is simply unjust and inhuman and its continued practice is a stain on a society standing on humanitarian values. Beyond this, the death penalty regime is a clear violation Article 6 (right to life) of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) and Article 3 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. And, interestingly, India, Pakistan, Maldives, and Afghanistan are signatories to these conventions.

      Although the task remains unfulfilled, the second optional protocol to ICCPR was introduced in 1991 with the aim of abolishing of the death penalty globally. However, the instrument only succeeded in imposing an obligation on the international community to disallow capital punishment in the case of minors and pregnant women.

      Despite this, the Maldivian parliament recently enacted a law that confirms death penalty can be applied to a minor who commits an intentional murder or any serious crime.

      A UN resolution that called for a global moratorium on the death penalty was passed by the General Assembly on December 19, 2016. It was supported by 117 states; 40 voted against it and 31 abstained.

      Moreover, the International Criminal Court, which is situated in The Hague, also slams the death penalty and favors life imprisonment even for crimes against humanity, such as genocide.

      Even as the global trend roots for abolition, the states imposing the death penalty justify their slated position. They appeal to each state’s sovereign rights to determine its own law (as enshrined under Article 2 Paragraph 7 of the UN Charter, i.e., the principle of non-intervention in the domestic affairs of a state). They also argue that the death penalty is exercised in rare cases and insist their legal systems guarantee rule of law and ample procedural safeguards for a fair and speedy trial.

      However, “abolition is now entrenched in human rights discourse and it cannot be limited to national criminal jurisprudence. If one makes the ‘sovereignty defense’ then its simply a frivolous justification,” says Saxena.

      Ultimately, the “death penalty is not a strong enough deterrent; rather effective laws and order are,” Saxena argues. Though a section of the population in India favors the death penalty for crimes involving women and children or terrorism,  she believes“the move towards a more enlightened approach (i.e., abolition) could be initiated in Parliament.”

      The criminal jurisprudence of most of South Asia on death penalty falls short of international obligations and its high time to rethink their stand on the death penalty.

       

      As per the reports of Amnesty International, around 140 countries — more than two-third of the world — have abolished the death penalty in law or practice. The South Asian states, except Nepal, Bhutan, and Sri Lanka, are out of step with this global trend.

  • ramsey tang's Avatar
    3 posts since May '17
  • array88's Avatar
    1,239 posts since May '14
    • Originally posted by BusAnalayzer:

      Future extension for 258

      Joo Koon Interchange >> JW St 64 (BNL MRT) >> Boon Lay Way >> Corporation Rd >> Jurong Bird Park (loop)

      ** New stops along Jalan Ahmend Ibrahim

      (1) SPH Print Center

      (2) World of Districts

      (3) Jurong Bird Park (existing where 194 calls), return via old 194 route.

      Jurong Pier Rd (express)

      (4) Ila Technologies

      Corporation Road & back.

      178

      Jurong East Interchange >> Woodlands Interchange

      ** Missing sector covered by svc 49 and svc 258.

      Shouldn't this be under "Route Suggestions" thread?

  • hgdep103's Avatar
    310 posts since Sep '16
  • Moderator
    H2 Chemistry @ BedokFunland JC (near VJC & TJC)
    UltimaOnline's Avatar
    11,863 posts since May '05
  • BusAnalayzer's Avatar
    10,170 posts since May '12
    • Has BCM reduced bus bunching as they claimed? I think bus bunching issue still continues in a big way especially for feeders/intratowns it has become worse.

  • Moderator
    Chemguide7's Avatar
    249 posts since Jul '11
    • You can call the hotline on Monday morning and see what they say.

      It depends on the flexibility of the admin office to accommodate requests.

  • Moderator
    H2 Chemistry @ BedokFunland JC (near VJC & TJC)
    UltimaOnline's Avatar
    11,863 posts since May '05
  • Bluepop's Avatar
    19 posts since Mar '14
    • Originally posted by qdtimes2:

      You basically learn stuffs in NUS and NTU Biz/Acct. Going under Accountancy does not mean that you cannot go to Finance. In fact, it is not uncommon that students realise that they do want to do accounting & auditing etc, or work in Big 4. 

      Why is NUS IGP for NUS Biz/Acct higher? I'm not sure but it is likely because NUS Biz/Act has significantly less placing available for students. If you look at the placings available in NTU AY2016-2017, there are actually about 600 placings each LOL. (http://www3.ntu.edu.sg/oad2/website_files/IGP/NTU_IGP.pdf) I seriously doubt NUS has that many vacancies. Probably at most around 200 for each Biz and Acct.  In here, I want to point out that IGP is not a good indication of competitiveness and "smartness". It WILL be competitive at NTU and NUS. Almost everyone is academically inclined (regardless RI/HCI or other JCs), and are hungry for good grades amidst the bell curve. 

      *** I forgot to mention this, but NUS also has implemented two new systems recently. 

      1) The first year is grade-free for all students: they can just ignore the grade of whichever module they want.

      2) The 5-pillar system for people not in the USP(scholars programme). For two of the pillars, students are must take 2 modules: Quantitative Reasoning and Asking Questions. In my opinion, this is a poor policy. Why must students be forced to take certain modules that are not requisites of any other modules? Furthermore, I strongly doubt their worthiness even though I have not taken them before. Quantitative Reasoning is about learning Statistics and using Statistics to support information. Asking Questions is likely about introducing you to critical thinking. 

      It is bizarre why students are forced to take up Quantitative Reasoning. You don't nee d this to know how to use basic Statistics, there are other introductory modules on Statistics to do that. Some majors are to take their own modules that teaches basic Statistics as well, so it will be like learning the same kind of stuffs again. Some majors don't even require Statistics.

      Nobody has taken Asking Questions module yet but I'm highly skeptical about the depth it offers (the module description admits the limit of time), and I am confident that my peers know how to think well enough.  If it is indeed true that the module contents are basic, and that students know how to think well enough, then the module provides no educational value. Although you may see people make stupid and senseless statements, it's more like because they don't practise thinking. However, you don't need to take a module to practise it. 

      Some reviews for Quantitative Reasoning: https://nusmods.com/modules/GER1000 

      You may find some reviews for the Biz/Acct modules too.


      Pardon me if i asked on the behalf of my gf who is matriculating in NUS biz admin (acct) this Aug instead! icon_wink.gif

      NUS Biz/Acct:

      1) Under the bidding system, what if we do not get the module we want esp if it is a core module? Is there actually a fixed list of core modules etc that we must take and the planning of when to take up will be up to us through bidding as long as we read and pass before we graduate?

      2) Under the BBA curriculum 2017, what does the direct honour mean? Isit something same as NTU 3year direct honour or do we still takes up 4 yrs? 

      3) Isit ok to graduate w/o an honour in NUS Biz/Acct? Whats the impact (i.e. employment, worthiness of the normal degree)?

      4) Under BBA curriculum 2017, there is a compulsory global immersion. What does it mean? As in must it bea semester aboard or it can be just a short study trip (e.g. 1 or 2 weeks)?What if we do not want? Can we opt out even though its compulsory?

      5) Whats the workload, class participation and sch hours like in NTU Acct and NUS biz/acct? Which is easier which is more stressful?

      Anyw additional qns...

      U mentioned the grade free first year, so it wont be calculated into the gpa right? What abt the 20MCs of S/U for poly students? In the case if someone choose to go on SEP whereby grades are also not calculated into the gpa, along with the S/U and grade free first year, isnt the gpa for a NUS graduate definitely going to be very high even though they didnt rly score well in many modules? It might seems good for their final CGPA, but how is it gonna benefit them when they are finding work since no grades will be reflected on the transcript for many modules?

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    262,420 posts since Dec '99
  • Bluepop's Avatar
    19 posts since Mar '14
    • Originally posted by qdtimes2:

      You basically learn stuffs in NUS and NTU Biz/Acct. Going under Accountancy does not mean that you cannot go to Finance. In fact, it is not uncommon that students realise that they do want to do accounting & auditing etc, or work in Big 4. 

      Why is NUS IGP for NUS Biz/Acct higher? I'm not sure but it is likely because NUS Biz/Act has significantly less placing available for students. If you look at the placings available in NTU AY2016-2017, there are actually about 600 placings each LOL. (http://www3.ntu.edu.sg/oad2/website_files/IGP/NTU_IGP.pdf) I seriously doubt NUS has that many vacancies. Probably at most around 200 for each Biz and Acct.  In here, I want to point out that IGP is not a good indication of competitiveness and "smartness". It WILL be competitive at NTU and NUS. Almost everyone is academically inclined (regardless RI/HCI or other JCs), and are hungry for good grades amidst the bell curve. 

      *** I forgot to mention this, but NUS also has implemented two new systems recently. 

      1) The first year is grade-free for all students: they can just ignore the grade of whichever module they want.

      2) The 5-pillar system for people not in the USP(scholars programme). For two of the pillars, students are must take 2 modules: Quantitative Reasoning and Asking Questions. In my opinion, this is a poor policy. Why must students be forced to take certain modules that are not requisites of any other modules? Furthermore, I strongly doubt their worthiness even though I have not taken them before. Quantitative Reasoning is about learning Statistics and using Statistics to support information. Asking Questions is likely about introducing you to critical thinking. 

      It is bizarre why students are forced to take up Quantitative Reasoning. You don't nee d this to know how to use basic Statistics, there are other introductory modules on Statistics to do that. Some majors are to take their own modules that teaches basic Statistics as well, so it will be like learning the same kind of stuffs again. Some majors don't even require Statistics.

      Nobody has taken Asking Questions module yet but I'm highly skeptical about the depth it offers (the module description admits the limit of time), and I am confident that my peers know how to think well enough.  If it is indeed true that the module contents are basic, and that students know how to think well enough, then the module provides no educational value. Although you may see people make stupid and senseless statements, it's more like because they don't practise thinking. However, you don't need to take a module to practise it. 

      Some reviews for Quantitative Reasoning: https://nusmods.com/modules/GER1000 

      You may find some reviews for the Biz/Acct modules too.


      Thanks load once again! 

      I actually accepted NTU so far but would still like to consider the pros and cons between ntu and nus haha

      Just some pending queries..

      If an accounting student takes up NUS biz/acct, does it dilute the fact that they are an accounting student since NUS Biz/acct is more of a biz degree with an extended segment to accounting? What are the difference in employment opportunity it might caused compared to someone from NTU Acct going towards working in a Big 4 company e.g. Tax dept? Is it rly that many companies have a preference for NTU grad (in the case of NTU acct vs NUS Biz/Acct)?

       

      Edited by Bluepop 29 May `17, 1:12AM
  • TIB443M's Avatar
    673 posts since Sep '12
    • 27/05/2017

      SBS7658H on service10 (BBDEP 10)

      SG5331A on service201 (BBDEP 196)

      SBS3398J on service79 (BUDEP 143)

      SBS3244U on service253 (SLBP 253)

      SBS8496B on service157 (BRBP 238)

  • smarttuition.sg's Avatar
    439 posts since Jan '11