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  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
    • 2021 is a realistic date to get rid of this PAP government.

      Edited by Dalforce 1941 31 Jan `13, 7:28PM
  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
    • Originally posted by AshleyHow:

      And in others, it is good as it gives us our national identity 

      I don't want to be identified with garbage.

      Edited by Dalforce 1941 31 Jan `13, 6:50PM
  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
    • Singapore Government loses control of narrative

      By Michael Barr - 30 January 2013 10:36AM

      Dr Michael Barr is a Senior Lecturer at Flinders University and Editor-in-Chief, Asian Studies Review.

      Last weekend's by-election in Singapore has inflicted the fourth electoral blow in a row to the ruling People's Action Party.

      The PAP had already lost six seats to the opposition in the general elections of May 2011, collected only just over one-third of the vote in the presidential election of August 2011 (still enough to win against a divided opposition), and then failed to win back an opposition seat in a by-election in late 2012. The loss of the Single Member Constituency of Punggol East is a particularly cruel blow because it is a new constituency created only two years ago, and according to the former PAP MP for the constituency, this was done precisely because the PAP regarded it as safe territory.

      What went so wrong that the PAP could only win 43.7% of the vote last Saturday? The electorate abuts other opposition electorates, but this was not enough to make a dent in 2011, when the PAP won the seat handsomely with 54.5% (coincidentally,exactly the same percentage won by Lee Li Lian of the Workers' Party on Saturday against the PAP and two other opposition candidates).

      The problem for the PAP goes far beyond mere voter anger over a dozen different issues that affect everyday lives. That would be enough of a problem, but given time this can be corrected (and I have little doubt that despite this string of setbacks, the PAP is still not in any danger of actually losing government in the next couple of elections).

      The deeper problem is that people are now listening to a different narrative.

      Even when the Government is putting its own narrative, ordinary people hear a different one. In this election, the PAP's candidate, Dr Koh Poh Koon, a surgeon who trained in the US and the UK on government scholarships and who now has a thriving private practice, used the usual line that he had never been active in politics and had not even been a member of the PAP until three weeks prior to being announced as the candidate, but he had done well out of Singapore and felt 'duty-bound to stand and be counted'.

      In the past this tune played well, but this time people heard something along the lines of: 'I have won in the Singapore system and I want to protect what I have got.' The message from the Workers' Party's Lee Li Lian was that she has been active in politics for seven years, she is not happy with the state of Singapore and she wants to bring about change.

      The PAP candidate is a wealthy member of the elite. The Workers' Party candidate started with a polytechnic diploma in business which she upgraded to a degree in sales and marketing from Curtin University of Technology in Perth. She is now a personnel trainer in a private company, confirming a strong and new pattern of opposition candidates being drawn from the Chinese business community, and making her an ordinary person. Until recently, the 'elite' narrative would have won hands-down, but no longer.

      The Government tried during 2012 to trash the Workers' Party's record as a manager of the opposition-held Aljunied-Hougang Town Council, only to find the PAP exposed as the new owner of the software company that rents the computer software systems to town councils, software that was originally developed with government money and which has been placed in PAP hands after all other interested parties withdrew their tenders for one reason or another.

      The next problem for the PAP is that, having lost control of the narrative when talking to constituents, it now also risks losing control of the narrative when addressing the elite on which it depends for candidates and future ministers. How is it going to attract high quality candidates if it cannot guarantee an easy ride into parliament? Who is it going to find to run against the Workers' Party in seats that the PAP has already lost?

      No doubt it will find someone to stand, but if all it can promise is the risk of public scrutiny and defeat, it is not going to attract its usual collection of generals, permanent secretaries and senior executives from government-linked companies. Where is the next crop of competent ministers going to come from? The new pattern risks becoming a vicious circle that will further weaken the Government.

      Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong can count his lucky stars that he faces no challenges from within cabinet, but must now be under no illusions that it is only his control over the levers of institutional power that is keeping political oblivion at arm's length. Unless he is grossly negligent, this should be more than enough for him to coast into the next decade still in power, but this is surely not much of a comfort.

      The short-term risk for Singapore now is that the Government will lapse into old authoritarian habits, and bring back the 'knuckle-duster' politics of which Lee's father, Lee Kuan Yew, used to speak so fondly. There are firm signs that this has begun happening, with some renewed use of libel actions and politically driven prosecutions to try to suppress dissident voices, and a marked increase in the frequency with which foreign observers, solicitors and commentators are being turned away atChangi Airport.

      The problem for the PAP is that even these measures are unlikely to be enough to restore its mystique as an efficient, professional outfit, worthy of unquestioning trust. Those days are gone, probably for good.

      http://www.lowyinterpreter.org/post/2013/01/30/Singapore-government-loses-control-of-its-narrative.aspx

  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
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    2,186 posts since Dec '11
  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
    • Originally posted by charlize:

      When 7 million is reached, the next target will be 10 million. icon_lol.gif

      When 10 million is reached, the next target will be 15 million. icon_lol.gif

  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
    • Originally posted by ericgo:

      The problem is PAP didnt tell us the whole truths to this population planning back in the 90s....untill our island grew too crowded and awkards.

      In this 1991 book, the PAP set 4 million as the ideal population for Singapore.

  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
    • WP should set a realistic target of 29 seats for the short to middle range term. If they can get 10+ MPs, they can form a shadow cabinet.

  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
    • Now WP has 7 elected MPs. 1/3 parliament means at least 29 seats, so they need 22 more MPs.

       

  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
    • Originally posted by Clivebenss:

      more likely a WP/PAP coalition.

      icon_lol.gif

      I prefer get rid of PAP.

  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
    • 2016 1/3 opposition in parliament, 2021 opposition form government. 

      I think Singaporeans should aim for end of PAP rule by 2021.

  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
    • Originally posted by Rbs70:

      2016, I'm looking forward for it........

      Want to vote for opposition better vote in 2016, PAP is going to increase the PR vote bloc soon by opening flood gates.

      Edited by Dalforce 1941 29 Jan `13, 3:15PM
  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
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    2,186 posts since Dec '11
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    • Population projected at 6.9 million by 2030 with strong Singaporean core
      By Imelda Saad | Posted: 29 January 2013 1213 hrs

      SINGAPORE: Singapore's population could hit 6.9 million by 2030 - up from the current 5.3 million - if strategies outlined in the White Paper on Population to mitigate the country's ageing and shrinking population are met.

      The population projection also takes into account a lower GDP growth rate beyond 2020.

      Singapore is facing serious challenges of ageing and dwindling population, in particular from 2025 when its citizen population starts to shrink.

      The 
      White Paper on Population, released on Tuesday, is the first comprehensive report to outline the country's strategy to ensure a sustainable population.

      The proposal is to take in 30,000 new permanent residents (PR) every year which will keep the PR population stable at about half a million. Then, from this pool, take in 15,000 to 25,000 new citizens each year, to stop the citizen population from shrinking.

      At this rate, by 2030, Singapore's total population numbers should hit between 6.5 and 6.9 million.

      The figures are based on certain assumptions - that the stretched productivity target of between 2 and 3 per cent for this decade is further moderated to between 1 and 2 per cent, between 2020 and 2030. And, a workforce growth rate that dips from the 3.3 per cent growth over the last three decades, to just 1 per cent between 2020 and 2030.

      With those numbers, the country's GDP growth beyond 2020 will likely fall to between 2 and 3 per cent a year - from the current 3 to 5 per cent projection for this decade.

      To ensure a high quality of life for Singaporeans, the government will build ahead. Long term planning beyond 2020 include setting aside land to build 700,000 more homes and doubling the rail network.

      Mr Teo said: "We have moderated the number of new citizens and PRs that we've taken in. And we've also put in various measures, some of them very strong measures, to control the growth of the foreign workforce.

      "So this has already been moderated for the past three years or so and going forward, we want to make sure the road map we have is an appropriate one. And if we focus on those key issues, making sure we have enough young Singaporeans, a population structure that can provide for our seniors.

      "Second that we have an economic structure that provides good jobs that an increasingly educated Singaporean population wants, and we can provide high quality living environment. I think if we can do these three, we look at the population number, and the population we need, to achieve these three objectives and that's the way we looked at it.

      "So the growth rate of both the workforce and the population will be half to a third of what it has been in the last three decades, and we have to strike a fine balance because if we don't grow at all or shrink, then we'll face all the problems of an ageing population, the lack of dynamism in the economy which some of you are concerned about. But if we grow too quickly, then we may go beyond the constraints we have. So we been trying to find the appropriate balance."

      - CNA/ck/sf

      http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/singaporelocalnews/view/1250894/1/.html

      Edited by Dalforce 1941 29 Jan `13, 2:46PM
  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
    • Originally posted by croco2006:

      Politics in sg has to change - stop recruiting those doctors and generals...

      Don't elect people from elite class to parliament. Elect those from middle to lower middle class.

      PAP as an elitist party must be completely rejected.

      Edited by Dalforce 1941 29 Jan `13, 2:42PM
  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
    •  

      Singapore wants to boost population to 6.9 million by 2030

      SINGAPORE | Tue Jan 29, 2013 

       

      (Reuters) - Asian financial center Singapore, which is already more densely populated than rival Hong Kong, wants to raise its population by as much as 30 percent in the next two decades to ensure its economy remains dynamic, the government said on Tuesday.

      The growth in the population to between 6.5 and 6.9 million by 2030 - from 5.3 million now - would involve persuading citizens to have more babies and handing out citizenship to more foreign-born professionals, the government said in a white paper.

      "Many Asian cities are modernising rapidly, and catching up on us," the government said.

      "Singapore must continue to develop and upgrade to remain a key node in the network of global cities, a vibrant place where jobs and opportunities are created."

      The publication of the white paper comes just days after Singapore's long-ruling People's Action Party (PAP) lost heavily in a by-election amid growing public unhappiness about high property prices and competition for jobs which they blamed on the government's liberal immigration policies.

      Singapore has a land area of just 714 square kilometres, which is less than half the size of London, and a population of 5.3 million people. Foreigners account for just less than 40 percent of the population, up from about 25 percent in 2000.

      Hong Kong has a population of 7.1 million and a land area of 1,104 square kilometres, according to figures a government web site.

      (Reporting by Kevin Lim; Editing by Robert Birsel)

      http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/01/29/us-singapore-population-idUSBRE90S05U20130129

       

      Edited by Dalforce 1941 29 Jan `13, 2:40PM
  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
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    2,186 posts since Dec '11
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    2,186 posts since Dec '11
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    2,186 posts since Dec '11
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    2,186 posts since Dec '11
    • Next for WP will be Pasir Ris Punggol GRC. SDA should move on to other electoral wards. But Teo Chee Hean is a strong opponent.

      Edited by Dalforce 1941 28 Jan `13, 5:07PM
  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11
  • Dalforce 1941's Avatar
    2,186 posts since Dec '11