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    • The only direct official way to know is to call the 24/7 NS hotline at 1800-3676767 to speak to a customer service officer.

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    • With effect from 1 December 2015, the monthly National Service (NS) rank allowance for full-time National Servicemen (NSFs) and Operationally Ready National Servicemen (NSmen) in the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF), Singapore Police Force (SPF), and Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF) will be increased by $80 across all ranks. The NS rank allowance, which supports our national servicemen in their basic personal upkeep, is reviewed periodically. It was previously increased by $60 in 2012.

      With the latest revision, a recruit/trainee will receive a monthly NS rank allowance of $560, up from the $480 he currently receives. After factoring in combat or operational allowances, a typical SAF NSF enlistee who is an Infantry Trooper (LCP) in an Infantry Battalion, an NSF TransCom Officer (SC2) in the SPF, or an NSF Paramedic (LCP) in the SCDF will receive $730 per month in allowance. A typical NSF officer holding the rank of 2LT/NSPI will receive a gross allowance of $1,230 per month.

       

      Notes:

      1. On top of the rank allowance, combat allowances are paid to those in combat vocations in the SAF, and operational allowances are paid to those in frontline vocations in the Home Team. Combat/Operational allowance ranges from $100 to $300 for NSFs, and $200 to $400 for NSmen.

      2. The figures in this table refer to the base quantum of the rank allowance for each rank. NSFs receive an increment equal to 5% of the base quantum of that rank for every 12 months that they serve in that rank. NSmen receive an increment equal to 5% or 10% of the base quantum of that rank, if they satisfactorily complete an NS activity in the preceding work year.

       

      Source: mindef.gov.sg/imindef/press_room/official_releases/nr/2015/nov/30nov15_nr.html

       

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    • Home Team Career Centre
      SPF Recruitment Division
      178 Neil Road Singapore 088889
      Telephone:
      6636 6429 / 6636 6430


      Police Psychology Service Department
      SPF Counselling Hotline @ 1800-255 1151

       

      Edited by eac 27 Nov `15, 5:54PM
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    • Samaritans of Singapore (SOS): 1800-2214444

      Singapore Association for Mental Health: 1800-2837019

      Sage Counselling Centre: 1800-5555555

      Care Corner Mandarin Counselling: 1800-3535800

       

      Refer: www.imh.com.sg

      The Institute of Mental Health (IMH) is a 2,000-bed acute tertiary psychiatric hospital situated on a 25-hectare campus at Buangkok Green Medical Park. Set amidst serene surroundings, IMH offers a comprehensive range of psychiatric, rehabilitative and counselling services for children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly.

      IMH’s tradition of care started in 1928. We were the first mental hospital in Singapore, starting with some 1,000 patients. Since then, many advances have been made in treatment, training, and research. Our treatment integrates evidence-based therapies, supported by the departments of clinical psychology, nursing, occupational therapy, and medical social work, to provide holistic care for our patients. IMH is equipped with modern facilities, with 50 wards for inpatients and seven Specialist Outpatient Clinics.

      IMH was the first mental health institution in Asia to receive the Joint Commission International Accreditation in 2005, a highly coveted international accreditation for healthcare organisations. 

      Over the years, IMH has gained a reputation for quality research. In 2008, the Ministry of Health, Singapore, entrusted IMH with a S$25 million research grant to implement translational and clinical research into the causes of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders.

      IMH also plays a key role in training the next generation of mental health professionals in Singapore. We train psychiatrists and mental health professionals through the NHG-AHPL Residency Programme for psychiatry and through collaborations with the local tertiary institutions.

      Address
      Buangkok Green Medical Park
      10 Buangkok View
      Singapore 539747


      If you are facing a mental health crisis, please call our Crisis Helpline at 6389 2222 or seek medical help at our 24-hour Emergency Services located in our hospital.

  • Executive
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    • There are counselling hotlines for you to call if need arises.
      The counsellors are experienced professionals.

      You can call them at the following counselling hotlines:

      • SAF : 1800-278 0022 (SAF Counselling Hotline)
      • SPF : 1800-255 1151 (Police Psychology Service Department)
      • SCDF: 1800-286 6666 (SCDF Counselling Hotline)

       

      If you think you have been treated unfairly, you can bring up the case to your Commander. We will listen to your case. Do remember to bring along all facts and supporting documents.

      We will do our best to address your concerns. Servicemen are to seek redress through proper channels. Together, we can address your issue more expeditiously.

      Edited by eac 27 Nov `15, 2:07PM
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    • Refer: https://www.mlaw.gov.sg/content/cmc/en.html

      Info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community_Mediation_Centre_(Singapore)

       

      Mediation Referral

      - Please copy, complete and email all completed fields to [email protected]
      - All fields are compulsory.
      - Please note that information provided will be kept confidential and used in accordance with the Community Mediation Centres Act, Cap 49A, for the purposes of mediation and the Community Mediation Centre’s procedures thereof.
      - By submitting the information, you consent to providing your details to the Community Mediation Centre (CMC).
      - Under Sec 152(2) of the Criminal Procedure Code (Cap.68), should the referral be made by SPF and you subsequently fail or refuse to attend the mediation session, the Magistrate may dismiss any future complaints on the matter if you do not provide any reasonable grounds for such failure or refusal.
      - This form will be referred by SPF within 3 working days if details are complete to CMC.
      - Upon referral, CMC will contact all parties involved.
      - This service is provided free of charge by SPF and the CMC.

       

      PART I - TO BE COPIED, COMPLETED AND SENT TO: [email protected]

      Police Report Number:
      Name as in NRIC:
      NRIC Number:
      Address as in NRIC:
      Postal Code:
      Contact Details:
      Race:
      Language:

       

       

       

      Edited by eac 23 Nov `15, 6:29PM
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    • The only direct official way to know is to call the 24/7 NS hotline at 1800-3676767 to speak to a customer service officer.

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    • Singapore's poison-shrimp defence

      PUBLISHED : Friday, 06 February, 2004, 12:00am
      Michael Richardson
      South China Morning Post

      What does a Southeast Asian country do when it is small but has a big air force? In Singapore's case, it disperses its planes and, indeed, some of its ground forces as well, to many different places around the world for training.


      Singapore has by far the largest and most potent air force in Southeast Asia. It is part of the government's longstanding 'poison shrimp' defence strategy, which is intended to warn any larger country that trying to swallow the island state would be painful.


      Singapore carries a big stick, but chooses not to flaunt it. One reason the government keeps a substantial part of its military force abroad is to avoid alarming or provoking its neighbours, particularly Malaysia and Indonesia. Yet in a crisis, the aircraft could be ferried home within days.


      As a prosperous island state in the middle of an increasingly turbulent region, Singapore has long maintained a strong defence force. But keeping it well-trained and combat-ready is a constant challenge.


      With a total land area of just 660 sq km, Singapore has correspondingly small airspace, making it impossible to give air force pilots any extensive training or flying experience within national boundaries. The pilots must turn into a narrow transit corridor that takes them to one of only two relatively extensive training areas available.


      One, over the Indonesian island of Sumatra, is the result of an agreement with the Indonesian government. The other, over international airspace in the South China Sea, is jointly administered with Malaysia. But in 1998 - in one of a series of spats between the two countries - Malaysia alleged that low-flying Singapore military planes were spying and banned them from its airspace.


      Singapore's airspace is also congested because it is a busy civilian aviation hub. Such factors, combined with erratic tropical weather conditions, are severe constraints.


      As a result, at least one quarter of Singapore's force of about 150 planes and helicopters is stationed abroad at any one time, mainly in the United States, France and Australia.


      Short-term training for its military pilots is done in Indonesia, South Africa, Bangladesh, Brunei, New Zealand and Canada.


      Faced with competing demands for land for industry, business, housing and recreation in Singapore, the 50,000-man army and 300,000 reservists are also being squeezed out. They, too, have to train and exercise overseas regularly, mainly in Australia, Brunei, Taiwan, Thailand and New Zealand. Singapore is developing closer military ties with India and is expected to seek an agreement this year for its forces to train there.


      The costs involved in transporting troops and equipment over such long distances, and of paying for the foreign training rights, are a significant part of Singapore's annual defence spending of some S$8.3 billion (HK$38.1 billion), or about 5 per cent of gross domestic product.


      The need to move the army and air force regularly over long distances has also been cited by officials as one of the main reasons for getting new equipment, including four locally built, missile-armed naval transport craft, and four long-range KC-135 tanker aircraft from the US. They can refuel all types of fighter jets in the Singapore air force while they are flying.


      Military ties with the US are especially close. The Singapore air force has five separate training detachments at different American bases.


      Two are for its F-16 fighters, and once each for its CH-47 Chinook heavy-lift helicopters, its Apache Longbow attack helicopters, and its KC-135 tankers.


      Stationing forces abroad is designed to improve their training and enhance their ability to operate with partner nations. In a crisis, of course, they could be flown back to Singapore. This was shown for the first time in October 2002, when five of Singapore's F-16's and two KC-135 tankers stationed in the US flew home, via Hawaii and Guam, for a joint exercise with the US in the South China Sea.


      To take advantage of better weather and extensive flying space, Singapore some years ago shifted its entire basic jet training unit to the Australian air force base at Pearce, near Perth in Western Australia.


      Around the same time, it reached a separate agreement with Australia to station 12 of Singapore's Super Puma helicopters for 15 years at the Australian army base of Oakey in Queensland.


      'Increasingly close defence relations with the US, Australia, New Zealand, Britain and France have helped to anchor these friendly powers' regional security presence in Singapore, improving the city state's security by complicating the calculations of likely aggressors,' said Tim Huxley, senior fellow for Asia-Pacific Security at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London and author of a book on the Singapore military.


      Eighteen of Singapore's 50 upgraded A4-SU Super Skyhawk fighter-bombers, along with nearly 400 Singapore air force personnel and family members, are stationed at the Cazaux air base in southwest France. The planes and crew rotate every two years.

      The deployment, which the French government has agreed to continue at least until 2018, was first agreed in 1998. Singapore is the only non-member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation to be allowed to undertake long-term military training in France.


      Michael Richardson, a former Asia editor of the International Herald Tribune, is a visiting senior research fellow at the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies in Singapore. The views expressed in this article are those of the author

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    • NS have counselling hotlines for you to call if need arises.
      The counsellors are experienced professionals.

      You can call them at the following counselling hotlines:

       

      If you think you have been treated unfairly, you can bring up the case to your Commander. We will listen to your case. Do remember to bring along all facts and supporting documents.

      We will do our best to address your concerns. Servicemen are to seek redress through proper channels. Together, we can address your issue more expeditiously.

      ================================================================

       

      COUNSELLING

      The SAF seeks to promote the well-being of every serviceman by providing
      counselling support for those whom might be facing difficulties coping with their
      personal or work/training related problems. Servicemen who are experiencing
      difficulties can seek help through the avenues described below.


      Commander interviews of all recruits are conducted within 48 hours of enlistment into full-time NS. Regular interviews are subsequently conducted on a monthly basis during the PTP/BMT phase. Special interviews are also granted upon request. Servicemen can highlight their difficulties during these interviews for assistance.

      Orientation Officers identify, assist and counsel BMT recruits with adjustment
      and/or other personal problems.

      NS SAF Counselling Hotline is a 24-hour confidential telephone
      counselling service provided by the SAF Counselling Centre. Manned by
      trained counselling personnel, the SAF Counselling Hotline offers a crisis
      and telephone counselling service to all servicemen. Callers may
      choose to remain anonymous. Face to face counselling is also available
      at the SAF Counselling Centre upon request/referral.

      SAF Paracounselling Scheme
       complements other existing counselling
      services and provides another avenue of help at the unit level for those who
      need help to deal more effectively with their problems. Paracounsellors are
      specially selected, trained by and work closely under the professional guidance
      and support of counsellors from the SAF Counselling Centre. Paracounsellors
      can be identified through their identification badges as well as through publicity
      posters displayed in their units.

      ================================================================

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    • FYI, PES is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PULHHEEMS.


      1) Go to Public Hospital / Private Specialist.

      Note: You will be classified as a subsidised patient if your first visit is via:

      • Referral letter from a Government Restructured Hospital under subsidised status, A&E, Polyclinic or SAF, without specifying a specialist by name.
      • Discharge from inpatient class B2 or C without specifying a specialist by name.


      2)
       Consult specialist, and do whatever medical check ups required. E.g. physical exam, blood test, x-ray, CT scan, MRI scan.

       

      3) Specialist gave a finalised clinical diagnosis.

       

      4) Get the specialist to write you a memo which is to be given to SAF MO. Those who can and are willing to spend some more money can get him/her to write you a specialist report, which is more precise and detailed.

      Note: For not to waste time and money, please be more direct yet humble. Request the specialist to write about reviewing of PES and medical board / anything specific such as any excuses to your conditions.

       

      5) Book an medical review appointment using the eHealth module @ www.ns.sg (for NSman Reservists).

      Just go down to your camp medical centre (for NSFs).

      Call CMPB @ 6373 1340 to request another PES review (for Pre-Enlistees after CMPB Checkup).

       

      6) Make a trip down to the respective unit camp medical centre. Give the MO whatever supporting documents you have in hand. E.g. Specialist memo/report (most usually the case and highly recommended), x-ray films, CT/MRI scan report, blood investigation lab report... etc.

       

      7) MO will decide whether you are deemed eligible for KIV downgrade, according to the criterias set in the "PES Bible" directive. E.g. Diagnosis, Extent of Diagnosis, Degree of Diagnosis/Injury/Illness/Disease...etc.

       

      8) If deemed so, you will sign an acknowledgement notice of Medical Board, whereby your case statement is prepared for review discussion at the monthly medical board meet (usually at the Formation/Division HQ) with another NSF CPT MO and the Chairman (SAF Regular Medical Doctor of MAJOR rank or above). Your Medical Board result will be post mailed to you by your respective NSHRC (Formation NS Hub).

       

      Time and time again, the questions for Medical Review (Downgrade) is repetitive. Therefore, this serves as a general SOP for Medical Board.

       

      Extract from www.mindef.gov.sg/nsmen:
      NSmen must update their NS HRCs if they should develop any new medical condition or if their existing medical condition has worsened which might affect their ability to perform their duties during ICT. Arrangements will then be made for them to attend a medical review at the SAF medical centre to assess their fitness for NS.

      The NSmen MUST bring along all investigation results and memorandums from his external physician/specialist during the medical review. Depending on the outcome of the medical review, the NSman may be given a medical certificate to defer him from ICT, be scheduled for a medical board to downgrade him if his medical condition is significant, or referred to a restructured hospital for further investigation. In the event that the medical officer determines that the NSman’s medical condition will not affect his ability to participate in the ICT, he will allow the NSman to attend the ICT.

      Edited by eac 09 Dec `15, 1:55PM
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    •  

      The SAF psychiatrist will want to observe you, especially with the presence of a parent. 

       

      It's like going for an ordinary job interview where the department manager will interview you, and the HR manager will be present to observe you.

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