29 Aug, 01:04AM in sunny Singapore!

Recent Posts by eac

Subscribe to Recent Posts by eac

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • Annex A: Acceptable Haircut for Reservists in In-Camp Training (ICT)

      1. Acceptable haircut for male.



      Note:

      Moustaches are permitted. If a moustache is kept, it has to be kept neatly trimmed and of moderate length. No portion is to fall below a line parallel with the bottom of the upper lip or extend sideways beyond a vertical line drawn upward from the corner of the mouth.

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • PES E - Fit for administrative duties only.

      Further subdivided into:

      PES E1 – Able to participate in simple observance parades and LIFE activities.

      PES E9 – Unfit for any forms of physical activities.

      PES E grading will be followed by L-Code (Land Deployability Code) as follows:

      L9Able to bear firearms and protect themselves, others and property. Can be deployed in Combat Support vocations in Main Support Area, and/or Combat Service Support vocations of Brigade HQ and above.

      Edited by eac 24 Jul `15, 11:54PM
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • FitnessXchange has all the information you need to excel in your daily exercise regimes and IPPT/NAPFA. Get tips from the training guides to boost any aspect that you may be weak in and keep your BMI in check. You can also look up the timetables of FCC and SAFRA gyms if you plan to start an exercise routine. Step up on that healthy lifestyle with FitnessXchange!

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • Under the Enlistment Act (Chapter 93), all male citizens and Singapore Permanent Residents will be liable for National Service (NS) registration upon reaching the age of 16 and a half years old. A Notification Letter from Central Manpower Base will be sent to inform them to do the registration through NS Portal. NS registration is scheduled according to their respective birth dates.

      For those who are still studying, they can apply for deferment online during NS registration. For more information on deferment, you may refer to General Information: Deferment for Full-time Studies.

      For those who do not require deferment, they will be prompted to complete the pre-enlistment documentation and to book an appointment for pre-enlistment medical screening and an aptitude assessment test to determine the assignment for NS later.

      Pre-enlistment documentation and booking of medical appointment dates


      If you are not studying a full-time course or about to complete your course or not eligible for deferment, you will have to complete the pre-enlistment documentation online, as well as book an appointment for pre-enlistment medical screening and aptitude assessment test.

      Pre-enlistment documentation require you to update the following 9 panels:

      1. Personal Particulars
      2. Family Particulars
      3. Education Details
      4. Records of Co-Curricular Activities (CCA)
      5. Award & Proficiencies
      6. Bank Account Details
      7. Medical Questionnaire
      8. eFitting (Measurement of your size for uniform)
      9. Book Medical Exam Date

      Reporting for pre-enlistment medical screening at CMPB

      On reporting to CMPB for your medical screening, you will undergo the following:

      Image capturing (Photo taking)

      Your image will be captured at the in-house photo studio for printing of your SAF card. Your National Registration Identity Card (NRIC) will be submitted to exchange for this SAF card upon enlistment.

      Checklist for image capture:

      - Have a neat and short haircut and no dye is allowed
      - Have a clean shave as no beard is allowed

      Pre-enlistment medical screening

      You are required to set aside approximately 2 hours for the full pre-enlistment medical screening. You will be guided through the following stations for the screening:

      - Blood Station
      - Dental Station
      - X-Ray Station
      - Ear, Norse, Throat (ENT) Station
      - Eye Station
      - Medical Officer Consultation Station (Height, Weight, Blood Pressure, ECG will also be taken at this station)

      The medical screening will determine your fitness for full-time NS. You will be medically graded in accordance with SAF Medical Classification Guidelines and assigned with a Physical Employment Status (PES). The different PES are as follows:

      - PES A - Fit for all combat vocations (Full BMT)
      - PES B1 - Fit for most combat vocations (Full BMT)
      - PES B2 - Fit for some combat vocations. Required to take IPPT but can be excused up to 2 static stations in IPPT.
      - PES BP - Fit for Obese BMT
      - PES C - Fit for some support vocations (Modified BMT)
      - PES D - Temporarily unfit for grading and pending further review
      - PES E - Fit for administrative duties only
      - PES F - Medically unfit for any form of service

      It is very important that you highlight your past and current medical problems to our Medical Officers and support your claims by bringing along your past medical records, if any. This will facilitate our assessment of your medical fitness to better assign your PES. The information submitted will be kept confidential.

      Checklist for pre-enlistment medical screening

      Please report in PT attire (T-Shirt, short/bermudas, and sport shoes/sandals) with the following documents:

      1. National Registration Identity Card (NRIC)
      2. Medical reports, hospital appointment cards, X-Ray films and School Health Booklet, if any
      3. Duly completed Medical Screening Questionnaire signed by your parent or guardian
      4. Original and photocopy of all Education Certificate and transcripts for private and overseas courses only

      Please note that you would not be allowed to go through the medical screening without the medical screening questionnaire duly signed by your parent or guardian.

      If you are bespectacled, do not wear contact lenses when reporting. Wear your spectacles instead as you will be tested on your eyesight.

      You are advised to have your meal before reporting for pre-enlistment medical screening.

      Vocational Assessment


      Upon completion of your pre-enlistment medical screening, you will be required to go through Vocational Assessment at the Vocational Assessment Centre (VAC). This is done using a battery of tests called the Manpower Aptitude Assessment System (MAPAS) to assess your mental abilities. This is so that we can maximize our limited manpower by putting people where their abilities can be best used.

      Your Vocational Assessment scores will affect important decisions, which include assignment to a vocation and selection to be a commander (Officer, Specialist).

      Therefore, you should put in as much effort as possible to do the tests well and accurately, as this will not only help the nation maximize it's limited manpower, but also help us place you into vocations that will make good use of your abilities.

      Click here for more information on the MAPAS tests and how to be prepared.

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • The Vocational Assessment Centre (VAC) conducts a battery of tests called the Manpower Aptitude Assessment System (MAPAS) to assess your mental abilities. This is so that we can maximize our limited manpower by putting people where their abilities can be best used.

      Your Vocational Assessment scores will affect important decisions, which include assignment to a vocation and selection to be a commander (Officer, Specialist).

      Therefore, you should put in as much effort as possible to do the tests well and accurately, as this will not only help the nation maximize it's limited manpower, but also help us place you into vocations that will make good use of your abilities.

      What are the tests like

      We use different sub-tests to measure different types of mental ability. Some of the mental abilities that we measure include memory, speed of responding, abstract reasoning, following complex instructions, solving mathematical problems, mental spatial ability, and psycho-motor skills. Please click on the following links to try out some of these tests.

      a) Word analogies
      b) Number reasoning
      c) Picture reasoning

      All the sub-tests are computer administered. Most of the sub-tests will present a problem or question on the screen and you will need to respond accordingly. Some sub-tests however, measure speed or hand-eye co-ordination and may look like simple computer games.

      How long is the test at VAC

      Since we have to be as accurate as possible, we need to measure as wide a range of your abilities as is possible. Thus, the testing will require about 2 to 2 1/2 hours of your time.

      What to do

      • Do not worry too much. All we require you to do is to do your best. Each sub-test has instructions to guide you on what to do.
      • Ask for help: If you have problems understanding any of the sub-tests or the instructions during testing, there will be people on-site to help you.
      • Get a good night's sleep. Come for the test with a fresh mind.

       

      Edited by eac 17 Jul `15, 5:51PM
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • About 400 pre-enlistees with severe mental health disorders have been exempted from National Service annually over the last decade.

      The Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) has a team of over 1,200 psychiatrists, counsellors, para-counsellors and psychologists who deal with issues related to mental health.

      In a written reply to Non-Constituency Member of Parliament Lina Chiam on Tuesday (Jul 14), Defence Minister Ng Eng Hen said the ratio of psychiatrists within the SAF is more than twice that of the national population.

      The SAF also draws upon the resources such as the Institute of Mental Health and psychiatric departments in restructured hospitals.

      - CNA/xq

      URL: channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/average-of-400-exempted/1984114.html
      14 Jul 2015 22:05

      Edited by eac 14 Jul `15, 10:48PM
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • More can be done to monitor and support national servicemen with mental health issues, according to two experts who used to work with the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF).

      These include fighting the stigma attached to such illnesses, raising awareness about mental health and having more in-camp psychiatrists.

      Earlier this week, State Coroner Imran Abdul Hamid delivered his findings on the death of Private Ganesh Pillay Magindren, who was found at the foot of his Sengkang condominium last July.

      The 23-year-old had been diagnosed with schizophrenia, which distorts a person’s thoughts and emotions, causing him to lose touch with reality.

       

       

       

      Handling a mentally ill soldier is not easy. They require proper attention and a suitable working environment for them to thrive, said psychiatrists contacted by The New Paper. For this to happen, the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) has to take ownership of its soldiers, Dr Ang Yong Guan said.

      Dr Ang, who is in private practice, was the head of the Psychological Care Centre (PCC) at the Military Medicine Institute during his 23 years with the SAF from 1986 to 2003.

      He said that of his 4,500 patients, there are fewer than 10 cases of full-time national servicemen (NSF).

      "I forward each NSF's case to the SAF. I believe the organisation should be responsible for its own soldiers," he said.

      But he thinks that the majority of these cases do not get picked up.

      "(When I was at PCC) I always made it a point to monitor those soldiers who had severe mental illnesses. I would even call their private psychiatrists to find out more.

      "Only if the organisation's leaders are committed to monitoring and helping these patients can they be given the right attention and help," Dr Ang said.

      Consultant psychiatrist Ken Ung of Adam Road Medical Centre said that when a soldier is found to be mentally ill, steps should be taken to ensure he is placed in a suitable working environment.

      Dr Ung, who sees about 30 to 50 cases of NSFs a month, said that superiors and colleagues should also understand that problematic soldiers may not always be trying to play the system.

      BE UNDERSTANDING

      "There are cases where the superiors are very understanding and sympathetic towards their condition and always willing to listen to them, and (the patients) thrive," he said.

      But those who had difficult bosses could lead to a downward spiral of the soldier's condition, he said.

      "I've had such patients who became more and more depressed, constantly had nightmares. Parents would complain about their behaviour and some even had suicidal thoughts," he said.

      Superiors should give their subordinates the benefit of the doubt, said Dr Ung, adding that they should be proactive and take the time to find out if their soldiers are all right.

      "The SAF is a microcosm of society. It's inevitable that you will get soldiers who are mentally ill. So you should learn how to handle and manage them."

      The Ministry of Defence (Mindef) said in a statement on Tuesday that it will study the State Coroner's findings carefully to improve and tighten its procedures to ensure better compliance by Singapore Armed Forces units in dealing with soldiers with mental problems.

      This article was published on April 12, 2014 in The New Paper.

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • Military Medicine Institute

      MMI
      The Military Medicine Institute (MMI) was established in March 1998 to provide Specialist Medical and Dental services to the SAF personnel. In 1999, Medical Board Centre and SAF Ward came under the umbrella of MMI. In Dec 2003, Military Medicine Institute, together with Tanglin Physiotherapy Centre, relocated to DSO(Kent Ridge) Building.



      Our Vision
      To be the Centre of Excellence in Clinical Military Medicine.

      Our Mission
      To ensure efficient sustenance of SAF fighting strength through delivery of quality healthcare in areas of Specialist Medical and Dental Care, Medical Grading, and In-Patient Care.

      Our Roles
      Through the provision of specialised medical/dental services and in-patient care, MMI serves the SAF by optimising the treatment and recovery of servicemen with significant medical problems. This will translate to operational readiness of the SAF units as well as improved well-being of the individuals in the SAF.

      Timely medical grading of servicemen allows personnel to be deployed effectively in service while minimising impact on operational readiness and personal health.

      Services available:

      - Cardiopulmonary Lab
      - Deployment Medicine
      - Dermatology
      - Ear, Nose and Throat
      - Internal Medicine
      - Medical Grading
      - Occupational Medicine
      - Orthopaedics
      - Ophthalmology
      - Psychological Care
      - Specialist Dental Centre
      - Sports Medicine

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • Helping servicemen serve

      Story by Benita Teo

      Serving in the military is certainly no mean feat. And when the security of the nation is in one’s hands, mental strength is as important as, if not more so than, physical fitness.

      When the going gets tough, it is often helpful to talk it out with a trusted family or friend. But, even with the best of intentions, not everyone is able to fully comprehend the intricacies of military life.

      To help the servicemen and women of the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) cope with the challenges of their military roles, the counsellors of the SAF Counselling Centre (SCC) are always ready to lend a listening ear. In fact, the team at SCC provides professional counselling services not only to all members of the Ministry of Defence (MINDEF) and SAF, but also to their families.

      Learning to live the military life

      Unlike civilian counselling centres, the SCC comes under military mandate, and its primary purpose is to provide mental health care to ensure that servicemen are able to carry out their duties efficiently.

      Of the types of cases the SCC sees, Mrs Marlene Koh, Head of Education and Prevention Services, noted that the majority were Full-time National Servicemen (NSFs) with adaptation issues. "Not everybody is used to dealing with authority. They all came in as students who only had to take care of their own studies."

      She added: "The second, smaller group would be Regulars with career or family issues. A third group comprises families and soldiers affected by critical incidents that happened around them, for instance training incidents or a death in the family."

      Servicemen in distress may seek help directly with the SCC through two channels: face-to-face sessions or the 24-hour SAF Counselling Hotline. On top of these, a Family Support Helpline is also available for the family members of soldiers deployed overseas who are in need of assistance.

      Eyes and ears on the ground

      To help junior and senior commanders to identify and assist men under their charge who are at risk of emotional distress, the SCC conducts regular workshops. In addition to basic counselling skills, stress management and suicide prevention are also taught at the workshops.

      Ms Cheryl Chia, an SCC counsellor with 14 years of experience, explained that equipping commanders with these skills is essential because "they are the eyes and ears on the ground".

      Another set of eyes that the SCC relies on to spot at-risk servicemen are the paracounsellors - Regulars who volunteer to help look after the mental welfare of servicemen at the unit level. To be appointed as paracounsellors, they have to go through a five-day course organised by the SCC that teaches basic counselling, suicide prevention and crisis management skills.

      Military Expert (ME) 3-3 Sulinder Singh, a Logistics Warrant Officer, has been a paracounsellor in his unit, 201 Squadron (SQN), since 2010. And being a familiar face in the unit means that servicemen know what to expect when they confide in him - trustworthiness.

      "I'm quite approachable, and they know that if they talk to me, it will be confidential."

      Allaying fears

      Besides assuaging doubts over client confidentiality, the counsellors and paracounsellors also dispelled the stigma of seeking help.

      "(For) those who are in a position of command, it may be a 'face' issue," said SCC counsellor Lawrence Yap. "But so far, I've not encountered any clients (Regulars) who claimed that attending counselling affected their careers."

      ME3-3 Singh echoed his sentiments: "Is there a stigma attached to people in the unit who see paracounsellors? No, not at all. They are not mentally ill, we just need to help them find the right way to organise their thoughts."

      The counsellor is in

      Help for a distressed soldier often begins with a visit to the Medical Officer (MO) with complaints of symptoms of stress. Said Ms Chia: "Usually they will say that they are unable to sleep or eat. When the MOs probe deeper and realise that the problem goes beyond a medical issue, they will refer them to us."

      At the SCC, the soldier will be assigned a counsellor. Through the sessions, counsellor and soldier will work together to identify the problems and set goals towards overcoming them. The counsellor will also impart skills such as stress or anger management techniques.

      When facing mental turmoil, a soldier may despair and lose his sense of self. One approach a counsellor may take is to remind him of his capabilities.

      "Counselling is about instilling a sense of hope," said Mr Yap, who specialises in substance and drug addiction counselling. "Everyone has it in them to overcome a difficult situation. We just need to help them see that they are not as helpless as they think they are, and that the situation is not as hopeless as they think it is."

      SCC counsellors also work with psychiatrists and psychologists from the Psychological Care Centre (PCC) at the SAF Medical Corps' Military Medicine Institute to provide all-round care to the soldier. PCC psychiatrists prescribe medication for conditions like depression while psychologists run tests to ascertain if a behavioural problem is linked to a learning or intellectual disability.

      Helping others help themselves

      With the ever-evolving social landscape, counsellors must stay up-to-date on new behavioural problems or addictions, such as social media addiction.

      Mrs Koh also pointed out that there are now more cases of servicemen suffering anxieties about not performing well or meeting expectations, and that many expected others to solve their problems.

      Mr Yap agreed: "To change, clients have to take personal responsibility for their actions."

      Nonetheless, the counsellors take comfort in the knowledge that they are changing lives for the better.

      Mrs Koh remembered a recruit who had attempted suicide after his girlfriend of four years ended their relationship and started seeing a friend of his behind his back. Mrs Koh helped him acknowledge his feelings of hurt and disappointment, and taught him constructive ways of managing his anger.

      The recruit started to improve his relationship with his family and make new friends in his unit. Nine months later, he was finally able to move on from the break-up.

      Ms Chia also recounted a recent case: "I had a client who wanted to kill himself. But after working with his unit and the psychiatrist, just before his ORD (Operationally Ready Date) he said, 'You gave me hope. Even though life ahead will be challenging, at least I know now that there are people who care, and that there is more to life than thinking about hurting myself.'"

      She added: "He even baked us cupcakes as a 'thank you'. It's the little things like these (that let me know I’ve made a difference)."

       

       

      If you are in need of help, or know someone who needs help, please call the following 24-hour hotline:
      SAF Counselling Hotline
      1800 278 0022


      Families of service personnel deployed overseas who are in need of help can call the following 24-hour hotline:
      Family Support Helpline
      1800 278 0023


      If you are interested in volunteering to be a paracounsellor, call the following number for more information:
      6373 1066

      Edited by eac 13 Jul `15, 9:28AM
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • When patients feel at their most vulnerable, Head of medical social services at Singapore General Hospital (SGH) Ms Esther Lim steps in to help them make sense of what is happening.

      Such patients may have tried to take their own lives or showed signs of wanting to do so. Ms Lim also helps families cope when they have lost a loved one.

      The 39-year-old's helping hand is extended not just to patients, but also to hospital staff who face challenges at home or at work, for instance, if they have been abused by a patient.

      In 2003, she pioneered a programme in SGH to train health-care and social work professionals in suicide intervention. It is now also offered in SingHealth's Postgraduate Allied Health Training Institute.

      Since becoming a social worker in 1995, Ms Lim, who leads a team of 85 medical social workers, has received more than 15 awards. Last year, she was one of two recipients of the Outstanding Social Worker Awards given out by the Singapore Association of Social Workers.

      She is married to a 37-year-old police officer. They have a six-year-old daughter.

      I specialise in suicide and crisis intervention because...

      When I was working in the emergency department years ago, I saw how a crisis, such as a life-threatening illness, a serious road traffic accident or an attempted suicide, can throw a family off balance.

      The sense of disbelief and loss can be overwhelming, so this is where I step in to help people make sense of what is happening.

      The immediate goal is to reduce the intensity of the emotional, physical and behavioural reactions, while the long-term goal is to help families get back to as normal a life as can be.

      A person's life is precious because...

      We live only once, so we have to live it fully and with dignity, despite our circumstances.

       

      One little known fact about suicidal patients is...

      They are not mentally ill. Anyone facing a seemingly desperate situation can be vulnerable to feeling hopeless and helpless, which may escalate to suicidal acts if the person does not receive help or cuts himself off from others.

      If I were to give an analogy for what I do, I would...

      Be a bridge to connect the suicidal person with the resources around him, such as family service centres, care facilities and legal aid. Often, a person may think nobody can help him, which is not true.

      The eventual goal is to reconnect the suicidal person with his family and loved ones through individual, couple or family sessions.

      A typical day for me would...

      Start at 8.30am with administrative duties, followed by morning staff meetings or journal club sessions. I meet senior staff members regularly to plan and implement assistance schemes which benefit patients.

      Other medical social workers also come to me to seek advice on cases they are working on. I co-manage the difficult cases, such as those which may involve suicide, or in which patients or family members consistently display behavioural difficulties.

      I also support hospital staff members who need help and teach them coping strategies.

      I have come across all types of cases...

      But I find that families with strong social support fare better in crises. After the initial shock and confusion, members organise themselves very quickly to protect the affected family member by providing physiological and emotional comfort.

      I love patients who...

      Make it a point to turn up for their follow-up counselling sessions because this shows their readiness and motivation for change.

      Patients who are forthcoming, open to working with their families and willing to reflect on themselves often make better progress.

      They pick up positive coping strategies to deal with life's challenges, which range from relationship discord, financial issues to mental health or addiction challenges.

      Patients who get my goat are...

      Those who blame everyone else for their problems, without realising that they have a part to play.

      For instance, a suicidal husband may be domineering at home and may keep blaming his wife and children, without realising that he has failed to communicate properly with them.

      This can also explain the persistent suicidal behaviour in some patients. This vicious circle may wear out their loved ones and cut patients off from the support they used to have.

       

      Things that put a smile on my face are...

      Receiving handmade cards from the children of one patient whom I saw for attempted suicide and depression over several years.

      Every year, though the drawings and handwriting would mature, they always conveyed their appreciation to me for being there for their mother.

      It breaks my heart when...

      An elderly patient asks me if the doctor can help end his life because he does not want to burden his children.

      I realise, through interaction with elderly patients, that they are so stoic and self-reliant that they feel useless when they cannot contribute financially, take care of their grandchildren or, worse still, become disabled.

      They have laboured hard all their lives, yet they have not come to accept that there is a time to receive unconditional care in return.

      I would not trade places for the world because...

      There is still so much to be done that I cannot find enough time for everything. This is what I am trained for and playing a part to restore equilibrium to lives is a constant reminder to live mine fully.

      My best tip is...

      To learn to take charge of emotions, thus reducing the likelihood of acting on impulse when emotionally charged.

      Some things which may help include taking slow, deep breaths, sharing your problems with a trusted mentor and putting vexing matters on the back-burner, that is, taking your mind off it and revisiting the issue when you are calmer.

      Get a copy of Mind Your Body, The Straits Times or go to straitstimes.com for more stories.
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • The Singapore Association of Mental Health (SAMH) will launch a mobile outreach team in July that will conduct house visits to members of the public with mental health concerns.

      The measure was announced by Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean at the annual SAMH charity dinner held on Friday at Resorts World Convention Centre. In his address, he repeatedly emphasised the need to "foster a more inclusive society".

      "By working together, the sum of our collective efforts is larger than what we could each do on our own," Mr Teo said. "It is important to encourage people to seek help early through education, and to reduce discrimination against those with mental illness."

      Mr Teo also highlighted the achievements of SAMH in recent years. The Creative Hub at Goodman Arts Centre, which promotes mental health recovery through expressive arts such as music and dance, attracted 1,558 people in 2012. The facility opened in October 2011. Some 460 youth and their families also benefited from the YouthReach Centre, a specialised community mental health service for children and youth, since it started in August 2006.

       

       

      Signs of psychological trouble

      WHAT are some of the signs that your child may be suffering from psychological problems? Psychiatrists point to some of the things that you could look out for:

          Sleep or appetite problems

          Behaviour and speech that seem out of character

          Difficulty concentrating or a lack of motivation

          A drop in academic performance

          Becoming increasingly withdrawn from families and peers, preferring to keep to oneself at home

          Becoming argumentative towards family and friends

          Hallucinations, delusional beliefs, odd or impulsive behaviour and even suicidal tendencies.

      If there has been a recent crisis such as the loss of a loved one, a divorce or school stress, be sure to check on how the child is coping. Take note of how he is performing in school and how he is interacting with others. 

       

      Who to call for help:

      Touchline: 1800-377-2252

      Youth Challenge: 6336-3434

      Tinkle Friend: 1800-274-4788

      Befrienders of Youth: 6256-4440

      SOS: 1800-221-4444

      Parentline: 6289-8811

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • MOH to launch two new community-based mental health initiatives
      Posted: 12 November 2012 1930 hrs

      Minister of State for Health Dr Amy Khor announced in Parliament on Monday two new community-based mental health initiatives designed to improve Singaporeans' access to mental healthcare.

      "We are developing Assessment and Shared Care Teams (ASCAT), which are specialist-led mental health teams based in the community, in order to improve access to mental health care. We are also developing Community Mental Health Intervention Teams (COMIT) to provide improved access to counselling and psychotherapy services in the community," said Dr Khor.

      Dr Khor also said that the Institute of Mental Health's (IMH) occupancy rate for the past three years averaged at about 80 per cent and that the hospital has sufficient capacity for new patients.

      There are currently about 2,000 beds across public hospitals in Singapore dedicated to mental health patients, with the majority in IMH.

      Responding to queries from Member of Parliament Mr Hri Kumar Nair on the criteria for admitting patients to IMH, Dr. Khor said those with conditions such as schizophrenia and depression may be admitted for closer monitoring.
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • Samaritans of Singapore (SOS): 1800-2214444

      Singapore Association for Mental Health: 1800-2837019

      Sage Counselling Centre: 1800-5555555

      Care Corner Mandarin Counselling: 1800-3535800

       

      Refer: www.imh.com.sg

      The Institute of Mental Health (IMH) is a 2,000-bed acute tertiary psychiatric hospital situated on a 25-hectare campus at Buangkok Green Medical Park. Set amidst serene surroundings, IMH offers a comprehensive range of psychiatric, rehabilitative and counselling services for children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly.

      IMH’s tradition of care started in 1928. We were the first mental hospital in Singapore, starting with some 1,000 patients. Since then, many advances have been made in treatment, training, and research. Our treatment integrates evidence-based therapies, supported by the departments of clinical psychology, nursing, occupational therapy, and medical social work, to provide holistic care for our patients. IMH is equipped with modern facilities, with 50 wards for inpatients and seven Specialist Outpatient Clinics.

      IMH was the first mental health institution in Asia to receive the Joint Commission International Accreditation in 2005, a highly coveted international accreditation for healthcare organisations. 

      Over the years, IMH has gained a reputation for quality research. In 2008, the Ministry of Health, Singapore, entrusted IMH with a S$25 million research grant to implement translational and clinical research into the causes of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders.

      IMH also plays a key role in training the next generation of mental health professionals in Singapore. We train psychiatrists and mental health professionals through the NHG-AHPL Residency Programme for psychiatry and through collaborations with the local tertiary institutions.

      Address
      Buangkok Green Medical Park
      10 Buangkok View
      Singapore 539747


      If you are facing a mental health crisis, please call our Crisis Helpline at 6389 2222 or seek medical help at our 24-hour Emergency Services located in our hospital.

       

       

       

      SINGAPORE'S Institute of Mental Health (IMH) beat over 80 hospitals in Asia to snag the top accolade at the Asia Hospital Management Awards (AHMA) last night.

      The hospital won the inaugural Grand Award for the Hospital of the Year, because of its good showing in six out of nine other award categories.

      The awards were held as part of the Hospital Management Asia 2011 conference.

      Dr Ashok Nath, chairman of Hospital Management Asia, said that the Grand Award was created to "encourage hospitals to excel in not just one award category, but to also strive for more wins".

      The AHMA, held yesterday at the Resorts World Convention Centre, is in its 10th year. The judges include representatives from Johns Hopkins Medicine International and the International Hospital Federation.

      Dr Chua Hong Choon, IMH's chief executive, said the hospital was honoured to win the Grand Award and that the win "gives us the affirmation that our programmes are evaluated by international consultants to be of best-practices standards".

      The hospital also won the Most Outstanding Project in the Service Improvement for Internal Customers Project category for its Case Management Service, a follow-up service for discharged patients.

      It was started in 2003 but was tweaked last year to include an information-technology system that supports the follow-up care process.

      Under the service, patients of IMH are assigned a case manager who makes sure that they continue to receive care after they are discharged. Case managers also often double as confidants for their patients.

      Said Joe (not his real name), 34, an IMH patient who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in 2003: "When I have a lot of problems on hand and no one to talk to, that tends to increase my stress levels. As my condition is easily aggravated by stress, that triggers a relapse, causing me to check in and out of the hospital."

      However, Joe's condition improved after he was assigned a case manager in December 2009. He spends time talking to her every time he goes for a medical checkup, and she counsels him on some of the problems that he faces.

      Other patients were also found to have fewer relapses and re-admissions, after having a case manager assigned to them.

      Between January last year and May this year, IMH saw an improvement in patients' compliance with follow-up treatment, from 78 to 88 per cent, partly due to the improved Case Management Service.

      There was also a fall in re-admission rates and the number of patients not completing their treatment.

      IMH also received two excellence awards in the Operational Customer Service Project, and Marketing, PR or Promotional Project categories for its Mental Health - General Practitioner Partnership Programme.

      The programme aims to improve access to mental- health care, especially in the heartland, by providing general practitioners with psychiatric knowledge.

      Edited by eac 12 Jul `15, 10:21PM
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • NS have counselling hotlines for you to call if need arises.
      The counsellors are experienced professionals.

      You can call them at the following counselling hotlines:

      • SAF : 1800-278 0022 (SAF Counselling Hotline)
      • SPF : 1800-255 1151 (Police Psychology Service Department)
      • SCDF: 1800-286 6666 (SCDF Counselling Hotline)

       

      If you think you have been treated unfairly, you can bring up the case to your Commander. We will listen to your case. Do remember to bring along all facts and supporting documents.

      We will do our best to address your concerns. Servicemen are to seek redress through proper channels. Together, we can address your issue more expeditiously.

      ================================================================

       

      COUNSELLING

      The SAF seeks to promote the well-being of every serviceman by providing
      counselling support for those whom might be facing difficulties coping with their
      personal or work/training related problems. Servicemen who are experiencing
      difficulties can seek help through the avenues described below.


      Commander interviews of all recruits are conducted within 48 hours of enlistment into full-time NS. Regular interviews are subsequently conducted on a monthly basis during the PTP/BMT phase. Special interviews are also granted upon request. Servicemen can highlight their difficulties during these interviews for assistance.

      Orientation Officers identify, assist and counsel BMT recruits with adjustment
      and/or other personal problems.

      NS SAF Counselling Hotline is a 24-hour confidential telephone
      counselling service provided by the SAF Counselling Centre. Manned by
      trained counselling personnel, the SAF Counselling Hotline offers a crisis
      and telephone counselling service to all servicemen. Callers may
      choose to remain anonymous. Face to face counselling is also available
      at the SAF Counselling Centre upon request/referral.

      SAF Paracounselling Scheme
      complements other existing counselling
      services and provides another avenue of help at the unit level for those who
      need help to deal more effectively with their problems. Paracounsellors are
      specially selected, trained by and work closely under the professional guidance
      and support of counsellors from the SAF Counselling Centre. Paracounsellors
      can be identified through their identification badges as well as through publicity
      posters displayed in their units.

       

       

      Being psychologically prepared is all about knowing what to expect and being prepared for it.

      To be better prepared, you can participate in Total Defence activities and Open Houses organised by the SAF/SPF/SCDF.

      Perhaps you should also talk to your family members and friends who have lived the NS experience. The more you discuss with others, the more comfortable and mentally prepared you’ll become.

      Because NS life is different from civilian life before enlistment, there are many adjustments you need to make.

      A good way to cope is to get support from your buddy and fellow recruits. They are going through the same tough training as you, so talking to one another will help relieve some tension.

      In most evenings during your leisure time, you’ll also have some time to call your family or loved ones to talk. They can give you emotional support during NS.

      You can have a one-on-one interview sessions with your officer to highlight any problems you may have. If you have a personal or family problem that need to be addressed, do let the officer know—he may be able to give you some advice or time off to settle your problems.

      Life in NS revolves around structure, routine and discipline. This helps us stay united as a uniformed organisation as well as imparts the rigours necessary to protect our nation and citizens.

      This does not mean there is just work and no play. In fact, after a few weeks in NS and you’ll find new friends and new reasons to smile!

      As a soldier, one of the biggest adjustments you’ll have to make quickly is in regimentation and discipline.

      Being in a uniformed organisation, you’ll have to obey orders from your superiors. Thus some of you may feel a sudden lack of freedom to do what you want and you may find yourself having difficulties accepting authority initially.

      Regimentation and discipline build strong character and toughness, so that you’ll be tough enough to handle difficult combat, crime-fighting or rescue situations without giving up or breaking down.

      When you first enlist into NS, you may have concerns of being in a new territory, with new faces and new things to do. But don’t let this get to you. Just remember the saying that “when the going gets tough, the tough gets going”.

      Following are some tips on what you can do to prepare yourself psychologically:

      • Adopt a positive perception
      • Build up physical stamina
      • Develop good working attitude and habits
      • Overcome psychological stress
      • Adopt teamwork spirit
      • Learn to be independent
      • Set realistic expectations

      You can also speak to your friends or family members who have been through NS. Ask them to share their stories. The sharing will help you reduce some of your fears, uncertainties and doubts.

      During NS you’ll be living with different people.

      Because these people come from different backgrounds, they may not think like you do or react to situations like you would. Instead of trying to select your type of people, you should cherish the diversity. This is a chance for you to learn more about your fellow mates and their cultures.

      You’ll find that you have many opportunities to absorb the different cultures—during training, eating, chatting or just seeing and listening. Take these opportunities and learn from people around you, you’ll have a much better appreciation of Singapore’s cultural diversity.

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • Under the Enlistment Act, NS-liable persons are enlisted at the earliest opportunity upon turning 18 years old. For those who are studying, MINDEF does allow some flexibility for them to complete their full-time studies up to the GCE 'A' Levels or Polytechnic Diploma (or their equivalent), both locally and overseas, before enlisting for NS. Those who have already embarked on their full-time studies but who do not meet the deferment conditions, will have to disrupt their studies and be enlisted for NS at the earliest opportunity scheduled by the Central Manpower Base (CMPB), including those who take up Singapore Permanent Residency in the midst of their studies.


      Local Studies in Government Schools
         
      GCE 'A' Level Studies and International Baccalaureate (IB) Studies

      NS-liable persons will be granted deferment for GCE 'A' Level and IB studies (and their equivalent) at Junior Colleges/ Millennia Institute/ Integrated Programme (IP) schools if they are able to commence the course* before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year.

      * For NS-liable persons who are pursuing their GCE 'A' Levels or IB in the IP schools, the deferment cut-off age will apply to the 5th year of study.

      Exceptions may be considered for students who do not meet these deferment cut-off ages, but are able to gain admission into Junior Colleges/ Millennia Institute/ IP schools.


      NS-liable persons who are returning from overseas and who wish to pursue studies in Junior Colleges/ Millennia Institute/ IP schools must seek prior approval from CMPB. They must do so before applying through the Ministry of Education (MOE)'s School Placement Exercise for Returning Singaporeans - Junior Colleges and Millennia Institute (SPERS-JC/MI), or before applying directly to the Junior Colleges/ Millennia Institute/ IP Schools. Persons who are deemed to have already attained a first education bar qualification (defined as GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications), be it locally or overseas, will not be granted deferment to pursue another first education bar qualification or another qualification below first education bar.

      Persons who have failed their General Paper (GP)/ Knowledge & Inquiry (KI) or obtained less than 3 H2 passes (excluding KI) in one sitting of the GCE 'A' Level examination will be considered for further deferment to repeat their GCE 'A' Level studies on a full-time basis, subject to one repeat only. Persons who have failed to attain the IB qualification will also be considered for further deferment to repeat their IB studies on a full-time basis, subject to one repeat only.

      Polytechnic Diploma Studies

      NS-liable persons will be granted deferment for Polytechnic Diploma studies (including Polytechnic Diploma through the Polytechnic Foundation Programme) and its equivalent qualifications (e.g. courses at the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts (NAFA) or the LaSalle College of the Arts) if they are able to commence the course before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year.

      NS-liable persons who graduated with NITEC/Higher NITEC qualification from ITE Colleges will be granted deferment for Polytechnic Diploma studies and its equivalent qualifications if they are able to commence the course before 21 years old as at 1st January of the course commencement year. Applications for deferment from ITE graduates who are above 21 years old as at 1st January of their course commencement year will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

      NS-liable persons who are returning from overseas and who wish to pursue Polytechnic Diploma studies and its equivalent qualifications must seek prior approval from CMPB before applying for their intended course of study. Persons who are deemed to have already attained a first education bar qualification (defined as GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications), be it locally or overseas, will not be granted deferment to pursue another first education bar qualification or another qualification below first education bar.

      Institute of Technical Education (ITE) Diploma Studies

      NS-liable persons who completed NITEC or Higher NITEC studies at ITE Colleges, will be granted deferment to pursue the Technical Engineer Diploma (TED) or Technical Diploma (TD) programmes at ITE Colleges if they are able to commence the course before 21 years old, as at 1st January of the course commencement year. They will be granted deferment to complete the academic phase only, and will be enlisted for full-time NS at the earliest opportunity upon completion of the academic phase. Deferment will not be granted for work attachments and internships. Applications for deferment from ITE graduates who are above 21 years old as at 1st January of their course commencement year will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

      NS-liable persons who are returning from overseas and who wish to pursue ITE Diploma studies must seek prior approval from CMPB before applying for their intended course of study. Persons who are deemed to have already attained a first education bar qualification (defined as GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications), be it locally or overseas, will not be granted deferment to pursue another first education bar qualification or another qualification below first education bar.

      NITEC and Higher NITEC Studies

      NS-liable persons will be granted deferment for NITEC or Higher NITEC courses at ITE Colleges if they are able to commence the course before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year.

      NS-liable persons who graduated with NITEC qualification from ITE Colleges will also be granted deferment for Higher NITEC courses if they are able to commence the course at ITE Colleges before 20 years old, as at 1st January of the course commencement year.

      NS-liable persons who are returning from overseas and who wish to pursue NITEC or Higher NITEC studies at ITE Colleges must seek prior approval from CMPB before applying for their intended course of study. Persons who are deemed to have already attained a first education bar qualification (defined as GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications), be it locally or overseas, will not be granted deferment to pursue another first education bar qualification or another qualification below first education bar.

      GCE 'O' and 'N' Level Courses

      NS-liable persons will generally be granted deferment to pursue GCE 'O' and 'N' Level studies at government, government-aided or independent secondary schools.

      An extension of deferment may be granted for those who wish to repeat their GCE 'N' or 'O' Level studies on a full-time basis, subject to one repeat only.

      Local Private Courses

      NS-liable persons who graduated before September 2011 may be granted deferment to pursue full-time studies (up to the GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications) at private institutions registered with the Council for Private Education (CPE), if they are able to commence the course before 18 years old, as at 1st January of the course commencement year. NS-liable persons graduating from September 2011 onwards may be granted deferment to pursue full-time studies (up to the GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications) at private institutions registered with the CPE, if they are able to commence their courses before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 & ITE students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year. The higher cut-off age will apply to courses commencing from 1st January 2012 onwards.

      Deferment for private courses will be considered on a stage-by-stage basis (i.e. a Certificate course and a Diploma course, if packaged together, will be treated as separate courses for the purpose of granting deferment). A new application for deferment must be made before the commencement of a new stage of studies. Deferment for the new stage of studies will be subject to the same cut-off age stated in the preceding paragraph.

      Overseas Studies
         
      NS-liable persons who graduated before September 2011 may be granted deferment to pursue full-time overseas studies (up to the GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or their equivalent qualifications) if they are able to commence the course before 18 years old, as at 1st January of the course commencement year. NS-liable persons graduating from September 2011 onwards may be granted deferment to pursue full-time overseas studies (up to the GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or their equivalent qualifications) if they are able to commence their courses before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 & ITE students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year. The higher cut-off age will apply to courses commencing from 1st January 2012 onwards.

      NS-liable persons will be required to apply for an exit permit for overseas trips of 3 months and longer and will be required to furnish a bond of $75,000 or an amount equivalent to 50% of the combined annual gross income of both parents for the preceding year, whichever is higher.

      Application for Deferment
         
      NS-liable persons may apply for deferment online at the NS portal (http://www.ns.sg) during NS registration and pre-enlistment documentation.

      Those applying for deferment to pursue local studies may be required to furnish documentary proof for verification upon CMPB's request. Upon CMPB's request, they will be required to submit to CMPB a letter from their school certifying their enrolment, their course of study, as well as their course commencement and completion dates.

      Those applying for deferment to pursue overseas studies must submit to CMPB a letter from their school certifying their enrolment, their course of study as well as their course commencement and completion dates. In addition, they must submit their parents' Income Tax Notices of Assessment (both local and overseas) for the preceding year.

      Those who subsequently wish to pursue or switch to a new course or institution must seek prior approval from CMPB.

      Notes: The information provided in this website are general guidelines. For further details, you may wish to contact the NS Call Centre at [email protected] or Tel: 1800-3676767 (eNSNSNS).

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    •  

       

      Source:
      www.mindef.gov.sg/imindef/mindef_websites/atozlistings/army/About_BMT.html

       



      Types of Basic Military Training


      PES A/B1 BMT
      This 9-week programme trains combat-fit recruits in the basic military skills to prepare them for advanced vocational training. The programme includes weapon training with the SAR 21 rifle which will teach recruits technical handling and marksmanship skills; a Battle Inoculation Course that simulates a real battlefield; a Field Camp which develops basic survival skills; progressive training to complete a 24-km route march which builds combat fitness and endurance; and hand grenade training.
      For those who fail to achieve the NAPFA test silver award, they are required to undergo an 8-week Physical Training Phase (PTP) prior to the PES A/B1 BMT.
       
      PES BP BMT
      As evidence has shown that obese recruits are able to achieve optimum fitness levels and weight loss in about 19 weeks, the new BMT programme for recruits with Body Mass Index (BMI) scores exceeding 27.0 will be 19 weeks. This BMT programme is designed to help obese recruits improve their physical fitness progressively while equipping them with basic soldiering skills and knowledge.


      PES B2 BMT
      Enlistees who were PES C1 previously underwent a 7-week BMT programme. The new 9-week PES B2 BMT programme will be conducted for recruits who are medically fit for deployment in selected combat and combat support vocations, such as signal operators, combat medics and naval system operators. These recruits will be given a new medical classification of PES B2, in place of the existing PES C1 classification. This is to ensure that the medical classification of our soldiers is consistent with their deployment. The new 9-week programme will include customised physical training, as well as basic combat training to prepare them for their combat and combat support roles.
       
      PES C BMT
      The 9-week BMT programme will be conducted for PES C recruits. This programme will include light physical training and vocational training to prepare them for combat service support vocations, such as service medic, and those related to logistics and administration.
       
      PES E BMT
      The 4-week BMT programme will be conducted for PES E recruits. This programme will focus on, vocational training as well as National Education, SAF core values, regimentation and discipline to prepare recruits for combat service support vocations.

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • Medical Classification Centre

      Location and Operating Hours

      Our Address

      MCC is located at Level 1, CMPB Podium.

      Central Manpower Base (CMPB)
      3 Depot Road
      Singapore 109680

      Our Operating Hours


      Mondays - Fridays: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm

      Saturdays, Sundays and Public Holidays: Closed

      Pre-enlistment Medical Screening

      Prior to enlistment, all pre-enlistees have to undergo a thorough medical examination at the Medical Classification Centre (MCC) within the Central Manpower Base (CMPB). This examination allows the medical fitness of a pre-enlistee to be assessed and this subsequently determines his Physical Employment Status (PES).

      Medical Screening Appointment Preparations

      As part of the e-documentation, you are also required to select your preferred medical appointment date as well as to complete the medical questionnaire (e7F). You will need to go through the medical questionnaire form with your parents / guardian so that useful medical information about you is captured.

      To ensure that your medical experience with us is pleasant and that the overall screening process is not unnecessarily delayed, we have compiled a checklist for you:

      1. Print out a copy of the medical questionnaire (e7F) and ensure that your parent / guardian and you sign on the printed document. Bring the e7F on the day of your medical appointment at MCC.

       

      1. Avoid wearing contact lenses. Wear your spectacles as you will be required to undergo eye checks.

       

      1. Wear loose fitting clothes (e.g. shorts) to facilitate physical examination.

       

      1. Bring along any medical documents to support your existing medical condition (if any).

       

      1. Health Booklet (if any).


      Clinical Examinations

      The medical screening process takes on average 150 minutes to complete and there is a series of test that you will have to undertake.

      Registration Station

      At MCC Registration Counter, you will be required to submit your e7F. As a form of verification, you will be asked for your NRIC or any form of photo identification (e.g. driving license, school pass.)

      Clinical Laboratory Station

      At the Clinical Laboratory Station blood samples are drawn for G6PD, haemoglobin and blood group typing tests. Simple urine tests to detect the presence of blood, protein and glucose (sugar) will also be carried out for you at the Station.

      Dental Station

      At the Dental Station, the Dental Officer will carry out an oral examination and Dental Charting. A Dental X-ray or Orthopantomography (OPG) will also be conducted.

      X- ray Station

      A Chest x-ray (CXR) screening will also be conducted for you at the X-ray Station for the radiological assessment of your heart and lungs.

      Eye Station

      At the Eye Station routine eye tests are carried out to detect eye abnormalities and test your visual and refractive error.

      ENT (Ear, Nose & Throat) Station

      At ENT Station an audio test or audiogram will be conducted to detect hearing abnormalities.

      Station 6 (Clinical Examination Station)


      Station 6 is the Clinical Examination Station, you will undergo height, weight and blood pressure measurements. An electrocardiogram (ECG) will also be done for you in the ECG Room.

      After completion of all the clinical investigations and measurements, you will then be examined and evaluated by a Medical officer.


      Station 6 Counter (Post Clinical Screening)

      Once you have completed the above series of medical screening, you will be medically classified with a PES grading.

      Station 6 Counter will also issue instructions for the pre-enlistee if the pre-enlistee is to return to MCC for any further medical investigations.

      Other Services

      MCC Eye Clinic

      The Specialist Eye Clinic at MCC provides medical assessment for eye conditions. An appointment will be made for you during the screening procedure should it be deemed necessary. Please bring all documents regarding any known eye condition for your appointment.

      MCC ENT (Ear, Nose and Throat) Clinic)


      The Specialist ENT Clinic provides pre-enlistment assessment for ENT complaints. You will be informed if there is a need for you to attend this clinic.

      MCC Specialist Psychiatric Clinic


      The Specialist Psychiatric Clinic at MCC aims to assess the suitability of a pre-enlistee with regard to psychiatric conditions already known or discovered during the screening process. It is essential to have one parent accompany you should an appointment be made for you and it would greatly shorten the delay to enlistment if you bring all your pre-existing psychiatric medical records for your appointment.

      MCC Specialist Orthopedic Clinic

      The specialist orthopedic clinic has the purpose of grading a pre-enlistee with regard to any orthopedic problems. A medical officer will be in attendance together with a senior doctor from one of the restructured hospitals. Here we will grade you based on your orthopedic problems. Please bring all medical reports and X-ray films for this visit.

      Medical Review

      A pre-enlistee with any abnormalities noted during the medical screening will be required to undergo medical review. This can take several forms as appropriately decided by the Medical Officer.

      Referral to SAF Military Medicine Institute (MMI) / Government / Restructured Hospitals

      The pre-enlistee may be referred to SAF MMI, government / restructured hospitals for further investigations. If the referral is required, he will be given a set of documents to bring along as well as information regarding the date, time and venue.

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • Medical screening is a series of medical tests done at the Medical Classification Centre (MCC) at CMPB (location map).

      The objective of these tests is to ascertain your medical condition and accord you a suitable Physical Employment Status (PES). Based on your PES, you will be assigned to a suitable vocation.

      Here are the various PES gradings:

      • PES A: Fit for all combat vocations
      • PES B1: Fit for most combat vocations
      • PES B2: Fit for some combat vocations
      • PES BP: Fit for obese BMT training
      • PES C: Fit for combat support vocations
      • PES D: Temporary unfit for grading and pending further review
      • PES E: Fit for administrative duties only
      • PES F: Medically unfit for any form of service

      Note that if you are given a PES D grading, it means that more time/tests are required to confirm your medical condition. This normally takes about 2-3 months. However, this duration may be longer depending on your medical condition.

      More information on Medical Classification Centre (NS Portal).

      Commitment to Care

      Want to find out more about the SAF medical system? Follow a recruit from his pre-enlistment medical examination to his encounters with the medical service during his BMT.

       

       

      Physical Employment Status (PES)

      Arrow PES A (L1) = Fit for all combat vocations. (Full BMT)

      Arrow PES B (L1) = Fit for most combat vocations. (Full BMT)

      All PES A and B1 will be followed by the L-Code (Land Deployability Code) as follows:

      L1 – Fit for all field duties including frontline duty.
      Can be deployed in Manoeuvre vocations and be involved in direct combat.

      Arrow PES Bp = Fit for obese Full BMT (applicable to obese recruits).

      ============================================================

      Arrow PES B2 (formerly called C1) - Fit for some combat vocations. Required to take IPPT but can be excused up to 2 static stations in IPPT.

      PES B2 grading will be followed by the L-Code (Land Depolyability Code) as follows:

      L1 – Fit for all field duties including frontline duty.  Can be deployed in Manoeuvre vocations and be involved in direct combat.

      L2 – Fit for most field duties.  Can be deployed in Manoeuvre vocations of Brigade HQ level units and above, and/or Combat Support vocations in frontline units of Battalion and above, and/or Combat Service Support vocations at all echelons.

      L3 – Able to bear firearms and operate in a field environment.  Can be deployed in Combat Support vocations of Brigade HQ and above, and/or Combat Service Support Vocations at all echelons.

      ============================================================

      Arrow PES C = Fit for combat service support vocations. (Modified BMT)

      Further subdivided into:

      PES C2 - Do not have to take IPPT for NSF/ NSman, except regulars who are required to take Alternative Aerobic Fitness Test (AAFT).

      PES C9 - All servicemen not required to take IPPT.

      PES C grading will be followed by L-Code (Land Deployability Code) as follows:

      L2 – Fit for most field duties.  Can be deployed in Manoeuvre vocations of Brigade HQ level units and above, and/or Combat Support vocations in frontline units of Battalion and above, and/or Combat Service Support vocations at all echelons.

      L3 – Able to bear firearms and operate in a field environment.  Can be deployed in Combat Support vocations of Brigade HQ and above, and/or Combat Service Support vocations at all echelons.

      L9 – Able to bear firearms and protect themselves, others and property. Can be deployed in Combat Support vocations in Main Support Area, and/or Combat Service Support vocations of Brigade HQ and above.

      ============================================================

      Arrow PES D = Temporary unfit for grading and pending further review.

      ============================================================


      Arrow PES E = Fit for administrative duties only.

      PES E1 - Able to participate in simple observance parades and LIFE activites.

      PES E9 - Unfit for any forms of physical activities; field duties/exercises.

      PES E grading will be followed by the L-Code (Land Deployment Code) as follows:
      L9 – Able to bear firearms and protect themselves, others and property.  Can be deployed in Combat Support vocations in Main Support Area, and/or Combat Service Support vocations of Brigade HQ and above.

      Arrow PES F = Medically unfit for any form of service.

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • A Medical Review is a medical consultation convened whenever a serviceman has a change in the status of a current medical condition, or if he develops a new medical condition, which may affect his ability to fulfill his NS liabilities. A medical review can either be initiated by the individual (known as Self-initiated) or by the NS Unit (Unit-initiated).

      Situations whereby the individual initiates a Self-initiated medical review include:

      1. He develops a new medical condition (e.g. slipped disc, high blood pressure, surgery for a medical condition). In such situations, he should bring all relevant medical documents for his medical review by the SAF Medical Officer. The SAF Medical Officer can then assess the condition, and recommend a medical downgrade, if appropriate.

      2. He has a long-term medical excuse for the same injury and the period coincides with a NS activity that he is unable to attend. He should see the SAF medical officer to document his medical excuse, and ascertain whether he is fit to attend the NS activity.


      Situations whereby the unit makes a Unit-initiated medical review include:

      1. Serviceman has a temporary PES status that has expired and he is due for a medical review by a SAF Medical Officer.

      2. Serviceman has a service injury requiring a medical review to prepare for a Permanent Disability Board.

      3. Serviceman has a medical condition necessitating a medical review to prepare for a Medical Board.

       

       

       

      You should bring along all relevant medical reports, investigation results, medications that you are currently taking etc. This will allow the Medical Officer to get all the relevant medical information and manage your case appropriately.

      If there is insufficient information available at the time of your medical consultation, you may have to return for repeat medical appointments, after more information becomes available (e.g. after a latest specialist report is obtained from your hospital).

       

       

       

      A Medical Board is a session conducted to evaluate the medical condition of a serviceman and to:
      a. review his PES grade;
      b. recommend a change of vocation or restriction of duties on medical grounds;
      c. endorse his extended-period medical certificate; or
      d. determine permanent disability if he has sustained service-related injuries.

      A serviceman is required to undergo a Medical Review prior to a Medical Board. This allows the unit Medical Officer to gather sufficient information (e.g. specialist medical reports, investigation results) so that the Medical Board can make a decision on the PES grade. Depending on the complexity of your condition, more than one review may be required.

      Medical Boards cannot be booked using the eMedAppt module. Medical Board appointments can only be made by a Medical Officer when your medical information is complete and all investigation results are back.

      You have the option to either be present or absent at your medical board. For your convenience and in clear-cut cases, your Medical Officer may give you the option of not being present for your medical board (i.e. having a Board in Absentia). You can however still choose to be present during your Medical Board in such cases. However, for complicated cases, you are required to be present during your medical board (i.e. Board in Presence).

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • Medical issues

      If you are feeling sick, let your instructor know and you can report to the medical centre for consultation or treatment.

      Medical Centre

      Depending on your medical condition, the MO may excuse you from certain activities for some time. You may be asked to rest in your bunk, at the medical centre, or even at home. Those with serious conditions will be sent to the hospital for treatment.

      More details on Medical for BMT@Tekong.

      Commitment to Care

      Want to find out more about the SAF medical system? Follow a recruit from his pre-enlistment medical examination to his encounters with the medical service during his BMT.

       

       

       

      Because NS life is different from civilian life before enlistment, there are many adjustments you need to make.

      A good way to cope is to get support from your buddy and fellow recruits. They are going through the same tough training as you, so talking to one another will help relieve some tension.

      In most evenings during your leisure time, you’ll also have some time to call your family or loved ones to talk. They can give you emotional support during NS.

      You can have a one-on-one interview sessions with your officer to highlight any problems you may have. If you have a personal or family problem that need to be addressed, do let the officer know—he may be able to give you some advice or time off to settle your problems.

      Orientation officer giving advise to recruit

      You will also have access to Orientation Officers who may be able to help you if the need arises.

      We also have counselling hotlines for you to call if need arises. The counsellors are experienced professionals. You can call them at the following counselling hotlines:

      • SAF : 1800-278 0022 (SAF Counselling Hotline)
      • SPF : 1800-255 1151 (Police Psychology Service Department)
      • SCDF: 1800-286 6666 (SCDF Counselling Hotline)
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • FYI, PES is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PULHHEEMS.


      1) Go to Public Hospital / Private Specialist.

      Note: You will be classified as a subsidised patient if your first visit is via:

      • Referral letter from a Government Restructured Hospital under subsidised status, A&E, Polyclinic or SAF, without specifying a specialist by name.
      • Discharge from inpatient class B2 or C without specifying a specialist by name.


      2)
      Consult specialist, and do whatever medical check ups required. E.g. physical exam, blood test, x-ray, CT scan, MRI scan.

       

      3) Specialist gave a finalised clinical diagnosis.

       

      4) Get the specialist to write you a memo which is to be given to SAF MO. Those who can and are willing to spend some more money can get him/her to write you a specialist report, which is more precise and detailed.

      Note: For not to waste time and money, please be more direct yet humble. Request the specialist to write about reviewing of PES and medical board / anything specific such as any excuses to your conditions.

       

      5) Book an medical review appointment using the eHealth module @ www.ns.sg (for NSman Reservists).

      Just go down to your camp medical centre (for NSFs).

      Call CMPB @ 6373 1340 to request another PES review (for Pre-Enlistees after CMPB Checkup).

       

      6) Make a trip down to the respective unit camp medical centre. Give the MO whatever supporting documents you have in hand. E.g. Specialist memo/report (most usually the case and highly recommended), x-ray films, CT/MRI scan report, blood investigation lab report... etc.

       

      7) MO will decide whether you are deemed eligible for KIV downgrade, according to the criterias set in the "PES Bible" directive. E.g. Diagnosis, Extent of Diagnosis, Degree of Diagnosis/Injury/Illness/Disease...etc.

       

      8) If deemed so, you will sign an acknowledgement notice of Medical Board, whereby your case statement is prepared for review discussion at the monthly medical board meet (usually at the Formation/Division HQ) with another NSF CPT MO and the Chairman (SAF Regular Medical Doctor of MAJOR rank or above). Your Medical Board result will be post mailed to you by your respective NSHRC (Formation NS Hub).

       

      Time and time again, the questions for Medical Review (Downgrade) is repetitive. Therefore, this serves as a general SOP for Medical Board.

       

      Extract from www.mindef.gov.sg/nsmen:
      It is crucial that you update your NS HRCs if you develop a new medical condition or if an existing medical condition has worsened, which may affect your ICT performance. This is so that arrangements will be made for you to attend a medical review at the SAF medical centre to assess your fitness condition for NS.

      You MUST bring along all your investigation results and memorandums from your external physician or specialist during your medical review. You may be given a medical certificate for ICT deferment, be scheduled for a medical board to downgrade you if your medical condition is significant, or be referred to a restructured hospital for further examination depending on the outcome of your medical review.

      If your medical condition is deemed suited for ICT participation by the medical officer, you will then be allowed to attend ICT.

       

       

       

       

       

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,840 posts since Dec '03
    • FYI, PES is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PULHHEEMS.


      1) Go to Public Hospital / Private Specialist.

      Note: You will be classified as a subsidised patient if your first visit is via:

      • Referral letter from a Government Restructured Hospital under subsidised status, A&E, Polyclinic or SAF, without specifying a specialist by name.
      • Discharge from inpatient class B2 or C without specifying a specialist by name.


      2)
      Consult specialist, and do whatever medical check ups required. E.g. physical exam, blood test, x-ray, CT scan, MRI scan.

       

      3) Specialist gave a finalised clinical diagnosis.

       

      4) Get the specialist to write you a memo which is to be given to SAF MO. Those who can and are willing to spend some more money can get him/her to write you a specialist report, which is more precise and detailed.

      Note: For not to waste time and money, please be more direct yet humble. Request the specialist to write about reviewing of PES and medical board / anything specific such as any excuses to your conditions.

       

      5) Book an medical review appointment using the eHealth module @ www.ns.sg (for NSman Reservists).

      Just go down to your camp medical centre (for NSFs).

      Call CMPB @ 6373 1340 to request another PES review (for Pre-Enlistees after CMPB Checkup).

       

      6) Make a trip down to the respective unit camp medical centre. Give the MO whatever supporting documents you have in hand. E.g. Specialist memo/report (most usually the case and highly recommended), x-ray films, CT/MRI scan report, blood investigation lab report... etc.

       

      7) MO will decide whether you are deemed eligible for KIV downgrade, according to the criterias set in the "PES Bible" directive. E.g. Diagnosis, Extent of Diagnosis, Degree of Diagnosis/Injury/Illness/Disease...etc.

       

      8) If deemed so, you will sign an acknowledgement notice of Medical Board, whereby your case statement is prepared for review discussion at the monthly medical board meet (usually at the Formation/Division HQ) with another NSF CPT MO and the Chairman (SAF Regular Medical Doctor of MAJOR rank or above). Your Medical Board result will be post mailed to you by your respective NSHRC (Formation NS Hub).

       

      Time and time again, the questions for Medical Review (Downgrade) is repetitive. Therefore, this serves as a general SOP for Medical Board.

       

      Extract from www.mindef.gov.sg/nsmen:
      NSmen must update their NS HRCs if they should develop any new medical condition or if their existing medical condition has worsened which might affect their ability to perform their duties during ICT. Arrangements will then be made for them to attend a medical review at the SAF medical centre to assess their fitness for NS.

      The NSmen MUST bring along all investigation results and memorandums from his external physician/specialist during the medical review. Depending on the outcome of the medical review, the NSman may be given a medical certificate to defer him from ICT, be scheduled for a medical board to downgrade him if his medical condition is significant, or referred to a restructured hospital for further investigation. In the event that the medical officer determines that the NSman’s medical condition will not affect his ability to participate in the ICT, he will allow the NSman to attend the ICT.