27 Mar, 03:11AM in sunny Singapore!

Recent Posts by eac

Subscribe to Recent Posts by eac

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    • What are the changes to your lifestyle, diet and exercise?

      Firstly, you are strongly advised to eat oats (instant/ quick-cook) as heavy breakfast, and greatly reduce eating fried foods and junk foods. Eat at home and home cook food with canola oil.

      Secondly, please start cardio exercising.
      Start from light to gradual to moderate.
      e.g. brisk walking, then fast walking, then slow jogging, then jogging.

      Thirdly, if you drink alcohol/ smoke tobacco, please quit.

      It's best that by changing your lifestyle, your BP will gradually stablise and be within normal range. Doctors advise that to manage BP effectively, it's optimal to change your lifestyle, next is to reduce drug dosage, and finally be completely off medicine.

      That's why I strongly urge you to eat oats (instant/ quick-cook).
      3 big scoops (Chinese soup spoon) into a bowl.
      Just add boiling water to 70% full.
      Cover the bowl with a plate and wait 10 to 15 minutes.
      Add water to 100% full, and consume at lukewarm.
      Fast and easy-to-make breakfast.

      Never ever skip breakfast.
      Start off the day by having a heavy breakfast.
      Have lunch at 70% full.
      Have dinner at 30% full. If still hungry, eat oats.
      If possible, drink Pu'er/ oolong tea (without sugar) daily.

      Why I recommend you this?

      Edited by eac 09 Feb `15, 11:45PM
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    • FitnessXchange has all the information you need to excel in your daily exercise regimes and IPPT/NAPFA. Get tips from the training guides to boost any aspect that you may be weak in and keep your BMI in check. You can also look up the timetables of FCC and SAFRA gyms if you plan to start an exercise routine. Step up on that healthy lifestyle with FitnessXchange!

      Edited by eac 09 Feb `15, 9:19PM
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    • There are many ways to get physically fit and you may have your own preferred sport such as swimming, soccer or taekwando.

      If you want to be disciplined about fitness, then the Secrets of Passing NAPFA (PDF) is a good place to start.

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    •  

       

      Source:
      www.mindef.gov.sg/imindef/mindef_websites/atozlistings/army/About_BMT.html

       



      Types of Basic Military Training


      PES A/B1 BMT
      This 9-week programme trains combat-fit recruits in the basic military skills to prepare them for advanced vocational training. The programme includes weapon training with the SAR 21 rifle which will teach recruits technical handling and marksmanship skills; a Battle Inoculation Course that simulates a real battlefield; a Field Camp which develops basic survival skills; progressive training to complete a 24-km route march which builds combat fitness and endurance; and hand grenade training.
      For those who fail to achieve the NAPFA test silver award, they are required to undergo an 8-week Physical Training Phase (PTP) prior to the PES A/B1 BMT.
       
      PES BP BMT
      As evidence has shown that obese recruits are able to achieve optimum fitness levels and weight loss in about 19 weeks, the new BMT programme for recruits with Body Mass Index (BMI) scores exceeding 27.0 will be 19 weeks. This BMT programme is designed to help obese recruits improve their physical fitness progressively while equipping them with basic soldiering skills and knowledge.


      PES B2 BMT
      Enlistees who were PES C1 previously underwent a 7-week BMT programme. The new 9-week PES B2 BMT programme will be conducted for recruits who are medically fit for deployment in selected combat and combat support vocations, such as signal operators, combat medics and naval system operators. These recruits will be given a new medical classification of PES B2, in place of the existing PES C1 classification. This is to ensure that the medical classification of our soldiers is consistent with their deployment. The new 9-week programme will include customised physical training, as well as basic combat training to prepare them for their combat and combat support roles.
       
      PES C BMT
      The 9-week BMT programme will be conducted for PES C recruits. This programme will include light physical training and vocational training to prepare them for combat service support vocations, such as service medic, and those related to logistics and administration.
       
      PES E BMT
      The 4-week BMT programme will be conducted for PES E recruits. This programme will focus on, vocational training as well as National Education, SAF core values, regimentation and discipline to prepare recruits for combat service support vocations.

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    • Physical Employment Status (PES)

      Arrow PES A (L1) = Fit for all combat vocations. (Full BMT)

      Arrow PES B (L1) = Fit for most combat vocations. (Full BMT)

      All PES A and B1 will be followed by the L-Code (Land Deployability Code) as follows:

      L1 – Fit for all field duties including frontline duty.
      Can be deployed in Manoeuvre vocations and be involved in direct combat.

      Arrow PES Bp = Fit for obese Full BMT (applicable to obese recruits).

      ============================================================

      Arrow PES B2 (formerly called C1) - Fit for some combat vocations. Required to take IPPT but can be excused up to 2 static stations in IPPT.

      PES B2 grading will be followed by the L-Code (Land Depolyability Code) as follows:

      L1 – Fit for all field duties including frontline duty.  Can be deployed in Manoeuvre vocations and be involved in direct combat.

      L2 – Fit for most field duties.  Can be deployed in Manoeuvre vocations of Brigade HQ level units and above, and/or Combat Support vocations in frontline units of Battalion and above, and/or Combat Service Support vocations at all echelons.

      L3 – Able to bear firearms and operate in a field environment.  Can be deployed in Combat Support vocations of Brigade HQ and above, and/or Combat Service Support Vocations at all echelons.

      ============================================================

      Arrow PES C = Fit for combat service support vocations. (Modified BMT)

      Further subdivided into:

      PES C2 - Do not have to take IPPT for NSF/ NSman, except regulars who are required to take Alternative Aerobic Fitness Test (AAFT).

      PES C9 - All servicemen not required to take IPPT.

      PES C grading will be followed by L-Code (Land Deployability Code) as follows:

      L2 – Fit for most field duties.  Can be deployed in Manoeuvre vocations of Brigade HQ level units and above, and/or Combat Support vocations in frontline units of Battalion and above, and/or Combat Service Support vocations at all echelons.

      L3 – Able to bear firearms and operate in a field environment.  Can be deployed in Combat Support vocations of Brigade HQ and above, and/or Combat Service Support vocations at all echelons.

      L9 – Able to bear firearms and protect themselves, others and property. Can be deployed in Combat Support vocations in Main Support Area, and/or Combat Service Support vocations of Brigade HQ and above.

      ============================================================

      Arrow PES D = Temporary unfit for grading and pending further review.

      ============================================================


      Arrow PES E = Fit for administrative duties only.

      PES E1 - Able to participate in simple observance parades and LIFE activites.

      PES E9 - Unfit for any forms of physical activities; field duties/exercises.

      PES E grading will be followed by the L-Code (Land Deployment Code) as follows:
      L9 – Able to bear firearms and protect themselves, others and property.  Can be deployed in Combat Support vocations in Main Support Area, and/or Combat Service Support vocations of Brigade HQ and above.

      Arrow PES F = Medically unfit for any form of service.

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    • Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) servicemen can now choose between Adidas and Zoot for their running shoes. Journalist Koh Eng Beng tests out the new foot gear.

      When news of the new running shoes was out, I was more curious about the Zoot sneakers. Unlike Adidas, the American endurance sports brand is little known in Singapore. I tested out both pairs in 4km runs and 200m short sprints at the scenic Southern Ridges near my office.

      The Zoot Energy shoes have an incredible level of cushioning; I could feel the "bounce" in every stride that I took. Comfort is premium as the inside of the shoes and its insoles are lined with silky smooth, dri-fit fabric. I could even run comfortably without wearing socks as the lining helps to prevent blisters by reducing friction and wicking away moisture.

      If you have flat feet, these are the shoes for you. Designed for runners with low-to-neutral arch, their stiff mid-sole and strong heel counter lock your foot in and keep it from rolling inward excessively. This awkward movement is known as over-pronation.

      Your foot arch is a natural shock absorbent system, and without it the impact will be transferred to the rest of the leg.

       


      The Adidas Duramo, on the other hand, does not have that "foamy" feel of the Zoot Energy. With less cushioning, it is a tad lighter at 288g compared with the Zoot's 314g.

      The Adidas shoes provide a good balance of cushion, stability and support for runners with neutral-to-high arched feet. Most runners fall into this category.

      My feet felt well-supported whether I was doing sprints or long distances. The little bump in the mid foot area fitted snugly around the arch of my foot. I liked the feeling of having such firm support under my feet.

      Runners with high arched feet will love the German brand shoes. They have softer and more flexible midsoles that do not inhibit the natural rolling of the feet.

      Verdict


      As I have neutral arched feet, I can wear both pairs of shoes. I found the Adidas Duramo more form-fitting for my feet, and a better balance of comfort and support. But for long-distance runs like a marathon, I would prefer the Zoot Energy which provides more cushioning.

      Honestly, the technical features do not matter to me as much as their looks. Like most Operationally Ready National Servicemen, I am a recreational runner. We might be slow, but we must always look stylo! I like the Zoot Energy's combination of bright blue, silver and yellow. While the minimalist blue and white Adidas Duramo may not be a head-turner, the more you look at its famous three-stripe logo, the more it'll grow on you.

      At $39.49 for the Adidas Duramo and $43.96 for the Zoot Energy, these performance sneakers are value for money. If you’re using SAF eMart credits to buy, they are as good as free. Grab yours at the eMarts now!

      Edited by eac 01 Feb `15, 12:22AM
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    • Pre-National Service (NS) students in pre-university institutions, polytechnics and the Institute of Technical Education (ITE) will have to contend with push-ups, instead of pull-ups, for their National Physical Fitness Award (NAPFA) test from January 2015.

      The Ministry of Education said on Thursday (Nov 6, 2014) that this change will facilitate the use of the NAPFA test results for pre-enlistment purpose, in line with the modifications in the Individual Physical Proficiency Test (IPPT) announced earlier by the Ministry of Defence.

      Currently, the NAPFA test consists of six items: Sit-up; pull-up for males and inclined pull-up for females; sit-and-reach; standing broad jump; shuttle run; and 2.4km run/walk. There will be no change to the test items for all students at the primary and secondary levels, and for female students in pre-university institutions, polytechnics and ITE, MOE stated.

      "Inclined pull-up and pull-up will continue to be used for this group to train upper body
      muscular strength and endurance," the ministry added.

      NEW PE SYLLABUS

      MOE also said its new physical education (PE) syllabus is being introduced in stages from primary to pre-university level from 2014.

      "The new syllabus aims to equip students with the ability to engage in a wide range of physical activities and sports. This will lay a strong foundation for a lifelong pursuit of a physically active and healthy lifestyle," it stated.

      Physical fitness will continue to be emphasised through the new Holistic Assessment in PE, which will be introduced to all schools in 2016 to support the new PE syllabus. It will help students develop a holistic perspective of fitness and the enjoyment of exercise and sports. Students will track their fitness level, participation in sports, games and other physical activities, the Ministry said.

      In addition, students will design their own programmes to achieve their desired fitness levels for different purposes, according to MOE.

      - CNA

      Edited by eac 01 Feb `15, 12:09AM
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    • Enhancements to NS IPPT Management & Training 

      July 2014

      The new NS IPPT Management system will be in effect from 1 Sep 2014.

      Enhancements to the NS IPPT policies seek to ease administrative constraints to better support NSmen in managing their fitness and other commitments. The key changes are as follows:

      a.   Extension of IPPT/IPT/RT windows to 12 months.
      b.   Increase in monetary incentives for good IPPT performance.

      Concurrently, the SAF will improve IPT and RT fitness training in the Fitness Conditioning Centres (FCCs). From 1 Sep 14, all Fitness Conditioning Centres (FCCs) will be providing a greater variety of training and specialised fitness classes.

      As part of SAF's continuous efforts to review the fitness training system, a new IPPT format that is simpler to administer and simpler for servicemen to train for will be introduced. A pilot implementation involving selected Army NS and Active units (i.e. at least 3,000 active and NS participants from various age groups, vocations and gender) will be conducted from Sep to Nov 2014.

      THE ENHANCED NS IPPT SYSTEM

      (With Effect From 1 September 2014)

      Enhancements with effect from 1 September 2014:

      1.    Pictorial diagrams of the current and new NS IPPT management system are as follows:

      a.    The IPPT window has been extended from 9 months to 12 months. In this window, NSmen must attempt and pass their IPPT test. Alternatively, they can volunteer for a 10-session IPT programme. They will exit the IPT programme if they (1) complete 10 sessions of IPT; or (2) meet their Personal Performance Targets.

      Example 1:

      My birthday is on 1 January.
       
      Old system: my IPPT window is 9-months long: 1 January 2015 to 30 September 2015.
       
      New IPPT system: my IPPT window is 12-months long: 1 January 2015 to 31 December 2015.
       
      b.    The RT window has been extended from 3 months to 12 months. In this window, NSmen must complete their 20-session RT programme. They will exit the RT programme if they (1) complete 20 sessions of RT; or (2) pass IPPT during the stipulated RT-IPPT sessions.
       
      Example 2:
       
      My birthday is on 1 January.
       
      Old system: my RT window is 3-months long: 1 October 2015 to 31 December 2015.
       
      New IPPT system: my new RT window is 12-months long : 1 January 2016 to 31 December 2016.

      2.    The quantum for the IPPT monetary incentives has been enhanced. The revised quantum is applicable to NSmen with birthday windows starting from 1 Sep 2014. For example, if your birthday window starts on 1 Sep 2014, you will be eligible for $500 if you attain Gold award. However, if your birthday window starts on 31 Aug, you will still be subjected to the old system, and you will receive $400 if you attain Gold, even if you take the IPPT after 1 Sep.

      3.    NSmen who do not perform IPPT and/or RT will continue to be disciplinarily dealt with.

      Transition to new IPPT system

      4.    As at 1 September 2014, NSmen who are still in their IPPT window will enjoy an automatic extension of their IPPT window by 3 months. Those within their 3-month RT window will have an extended RT window (i.e. remaining RT window + next 12-month window).

       a.    Example 3:
      My birthday is on 1 August. On 1 September 2014, I am 1 month into my IPPT window.

      After extension, my new IPPT window will be 12-months long. It will be until 30 Jul 2015 instead of 30 April 2015. I will need to complete either my 10-session IPT program or perform at least 1 IPPT test.

      b.    Example 4:
      My birthday is on 1 January and I failed my IPPT. On 1 September 2014, I am in my RT window.

      After extension, my new RT window will be from 1 September 2014 to 31 December 2015 (i.e. remaining RT window + 12-months) instead of 31 December 2014. I will need to complete 20 sessions of RT in this new window or pass an IPPT during a stipulated RT-IPPT session.

      5.    One-time Reset of Default Offences.  NSmen with existing offences and charges are allowed a one-time opportunity to reset all offences by completing their IPPT requirements during this transition.

      a.    Example 5:
      My birthday is on 1 January and I failed my IPPT. I have defaulted my RT for my past 2 windows and have been charged. After extension, my new RT window will be from 1 Sep 2014 to 31 Dec 2015. If I complete my 20 sessions of RT in this RT window, my 2 existing default counts in the system will be reset to zero. If I default my RT again, I will be disciplinarily dealt with.

      6.    Please refer to the advisory via the IPPT Booking System at NS Portal from 1 Sep 2014 onwards for your IPPT status.

      NEW IPPT FORMAT AND SCORING SYSTEM

      BACKGROUND

      1.    Fitness is an important element of soldiering. The SAF constantly reviews our training system, including physical training regimes and physical fitness tests, to ensure that they are relevant and effective. Starting from 1 Sep 2014, the SAF will launch a pilot implementation of a new and simpler Individual Physical Proficiency Test (IPPT) format, which will be accompanied by a new scoring system. The new IPPT format is expected to be fully implemented across the SAF in 2015.

      KEY FEATURES OF THE NEW IPPT FORMAT AND SCORING SYSTEM

      2.    A simpler three-station IPPT format to encourage personal ownership of fitness.  The new three-station test format will comprise a push-up test, a sit-up test, and a 2.4km run. These stations will measure the strength and cardiovascular fitness of our servicemen. This new and simpler format was designed to allow servicemen to train and maintain their fitness, without the need for specialised technique or equipment. Fitness is a personal responsibility. This simpler test format will further motivate our servicemen to take greater ownership of their fitness, and incorporate these exercises into their daily routine to maintain their fitness.


      Table 1.  New IPPT Format.

      3.    New scoring system to motivate personal excellence. The SAF will also introduce a new scoring system to accompany the new IPPT format. Servicemen will be allocated points for their performance in each of the three stations. The maximum number of points servicemen may earn for each station are 50 points for the 2.4km run station, and 25 points each for the Push Up and Sit Up stations. The maximum number of points a serviceman can achieve in the IPPT is 100. The points will be added together to form a final score, which will determine the serviceman's individual fitness standard. Similar to the current IPPT, servicemen will need to score the requisite number of points to Pass, Pass with monetary incentive, and to achieve the Silver and Gold IPPT awards. Active servicemen will continue to be held to a higher passing standard because fitness training is incorporated into their work and training routine. To ensure the high standards of our elite combat troops - Commando, Diver, and Guards will be held to a higher Gold IPPT standard.

      4.    This new scoring system will encourage servicemen to do their best for each of the stations. The better they perform in the stations, the more points they will be awarded. The flexibility of the new scoring system will motivate servicemen to exercise greater ownership on how they will train for their IPPT, allowing them to tap on their individual strengths to do well.


      Table 2. New IPPT Standards.

      5.    Shorter age categories for a better performance-to-age match.  As part of this physical fitness review, we will also shorten our age categories, from 5-year bands to 3-year bands. This shorter age categories allow us to better differentiate the different age groups of our servicemen, and is a better performance-to-age match. Instead of having to perform to the same standards in a five year age block, servicemen will perform to a new standard every three years. This shorter age category will be more sensitive to the effects of age on the physical fitness of our servicemen.

      EXAMPLE

      6.    Age Group 3 Pass example.  For a 25 to 27 year old NSmen to achieve Pass he would be required to perform 16 Push Ups in 1 min (6 pts), 30 Sit Ups in 1 min (14 pts) and complete his 2.4km run in 12min 40s (31 pts). With this performance, he would accumulate a total score of 51 points, which would make him eligible for the Pass Award.

      7.    Age Group 6 Gold Award example. For a 34 to 36 year old serviceman aiming to achieve Gold award, he would be required to perform 35 Push Ups in 1 min (20 pts), 35 Sit Ups in 1 min (20 pts) and complete his 2.4km run in 10min 40s (41 pts). With this performance, he would accumulate a total score of 81 points, which would make him eligible for the Gold Award.

      IMPLEMENTATION

      8.    Pilot implementation. Army will conduct a pilot implementation from Sep to Nov 14 to fine-tune the administration of the new IPPT. Selected Active and NS units will participate in this phase. At least 3,000 servicemen and servicewomen of different vocations and age groups will be represented in the pilot implementation.



      Table 3. Push Up Scoring Table.

       

      Table 4. Sit Up Scoring Table.



      Table 5. 2.4km Run Scoring Table.

      Frequently Answered Questions

      What is the current NS IPPT Management System?

      The current NS IPPT management system was implemented on 1 April 2011. Under this system, NSmen are required to pass their IPPT within the first 9 months of their birthday window. Those who fail or default on their IPPT have to attend 20 sessions of Remedial Training (RT) in the last 3 months of their birthday window. NSmen can also volunteer for IPPT Preparatory Training (IPT) in the first 9 months of their birthday window, and will fulfil their IPPT requirement for the year if they meet their Personal Performance Targets (PPTs)1. Those who fail to meet their PPTs have to attend 8 sessions of RT in the last 3 months of their birthday window.

      1PPTs are intermediate standards raised progressively at an annual rate towards an IPPT Pass. The PPT standard is derived from the results of the IPPT conducted during the first session of IPT.

      What are the key changes under the enhanced NS IPPT Management System?

      With effect from 1 Sep 2014, NSmen will be given 12 months to attempt and pass their IPPT. Alternatively, NSmen that require help can volunteer for a 10-session IPPT Preparatory Training (IPT). NSmen who pass their IPPT or complete IPT will proceed to either IPPT or IPT in their next 12-month birthday window. NSmen who fail or default IPPT or IPT will be subject to Remedial Training (RT). They will be required to complete their RT programme within their subsequent 12-month birthday windows. NSmen who volunteer for IPT will be considered to have met their IPPT requirement for the year if they (1) meet their Personal Performance Targets (PPT) at any point in the programme; or (2) complete 10 sessions of IPT within their birthday window. NSmen on IPT are advised to attend training at least once a week continuously for 10 sessions to obtain the benefits of the training regime.

      What are the specific changes to the IPPT Management System?

      a.    Extension of IPPT/IPT to 12 months.   The IPPT/IPT window will be extended from the current 9 months to 12 months, to give NSmen more time to attempt and pass IPPT or complete IPT.

      b.    Extension of RT window to 12 months.   Instead of the last 3 months in their present window, NSmen who default or fail the IPPT will be given 12 months in their next birthday window to complete 20 sessions of RT. This extension is to enable NSmen to better manage their other commitments so that they can meet the RT requirements. NSmen are advised to attend RT at least once a week continuously for the duration of his RT in order to obtain the benefits of the training regime.

      What are the changes to IPPT Preparatory Training?

      The IPT programme will continue to be available to NSmen who need help with IPPT training. Participants will be able to exit the programme upon meeting their PPTs. To better recognise the efforts put in by NSmen to train for IPPT, with effect from 1 Sep 14, service pay for IPT programme will be accorded to NSmen whose birthday windows start from 1 Sep 14. NSmen who complete the requisite 10 sessions of IPT within the IPPT window but fail to meet PPTs will no longer be subject to 8 sessions of RT. To motivate NSmen to participate in as many IPT sessions as they can, NSmen who default on IPT will be subjected to 20 – D sessions of RT in the next window, where D is equal to the number of IPT sessions that the NSman participated in, in the preceding 12-month birthday window.

      Is there a change in determining whether NSmen have met their IPT/RT requirement?

      NSmen who have failed or defaulted IPPT are liable for RT. NSmen who have defaulted IPPT will be liable for 20 sessions of RT during their 12-month RT window (new system with effect from 1 Sep 14). To differentiate between IPPT failures and defaulters, under the new system, failures will be liable to 20-D sessions (as opposed to 20 sessions), where D is equivalent to the number of IPPT/IPT attempts made in the preceding window.

      NSmen who volunteer for IPT will be considered to have met their annual IPT requirements if they (1) pass IPPT; (2) meet their Personal Performance Targets anytime during their IPT programme; or (3) complete 10 sessions of IPT during their 12-month IPPT/IPT window (with effect from 1 Sep). They will no longer be liable for 8-sessions of RT if they do not meet their Personal Performance Targets by the 10th session. This is to recognise that servicemen have put in their best efforts to train and meet their fitness targets in volunteering for and completing the 10-session programme.

      Under the enhanced NS IPPT management system are NSmen in RT allowed to participate in non-ICT IPPT that are not the stipulated RT-IPPT tests?

      In the new system, NSmen in the RT programme will only be allowed to participate in ICT-IPPT or RT-IPPT on the stipulated 8th, 14th and 20th RT sessions. NSmen are given sufficient time to attempt and pass their IPPT during the 12-month IPPT window. NSmen that are in the RT programme are deemed to be servicemen that require help to train for and pass IPPT. As such, it is mandatory for NSmen in the RT programme to participate in at least 7 training sessions before they are allowed to attempt the IPPT.

      Monetary Incentive


      What are the changes in monetary incentive for IPPT performance?

      To motivate personnel to do their best and maintain a high level of physical fitness, the quantum of the awards will be increased by $100. The new quantum will apply to NSmen with birthday windows starting from 1 Sep 2014; NSFs whose IPPT windows start from 1 Sep 2014; and Regulars for tests taken from 1 Apr 2015.


      Quantum for IPPT monetary incentives

      Disciplinary Framework

      Under the enhanced NS IPPT management system, what happens when NSmen fail or default their IPPT?

      Currently, both IPPT defaulters and failures are subject to 20 sessions of RT within the 3-month RT window. In the enhanced system, there will be greater differentiation between IPPT Failures and Defaulters. IPPT failures will be subjected to fewer sessions of RT in the 12-month RT window. NSmen who fail will be subjected to 20 – D sessions of RT, where D is equal to the number of IPPT attempted in the previous 12-month birthday window. For defaulters, they will have to complete 20 sessions. Within the RT window, servicemen will only be allowed to exit RT if they attain the Pass standard at the stipulated test sessions (i.e. 8th, 14th and 20th sessions).

      What is SAF doing to deter recalcitrant defaulters?

      IPPT is an annual requirement for all IPPT-eligible NSmen. NSmen who default their IPPT will be subjected to disciplinary action. A new disciplinary framework will be implemented from 1 Jan 15. Currently, NSmen with three such offences or more will be subject to either a Fine or be sent to Detention Barracks. Under the new framework, NSmen with three such offences will be subjected to Fine and a five-day residential In-Camp-Training (Physical Training) [ICT(PT)]. The ICT(PT) is a more constructive way to help NSmen to train for their fitness. The ICT(PT) focuses on teaching servicemen on the different types of fitness modalities and fitness habits.

      New IPPT format

      What is the impetus for the new IPPT format?


      Physical fitness of our servicemen is tested using the IPPT protocol. Prior to 2009, combat fitness was assessed using our Standard Obstacle Course and route marches. Since then, the Army has strengthened combat fitness training with the introduction of Vocation-Related Exercises and Vocation Obstacle Courses to meet our new operational demands. With this in place, it is now timely to review our physical fitness test protocol and standards.

      Will the Home Team be implementing the new IPPT format?

      Yes, the Home Team will be adopting the same IPPT format as the SAF. The Home Team has assessed that the new IPPT format would meet their needs for assessing the physical fitness of Home Team NSmen/NSFs.

      When will the trial for the new IPPT format be held?

      The trial will be conducted by the Army Fitness Centre from Sep - Nov 2014. It will involve at least 3,000 Active and NS personnel across different gender, age groups and vocations. NSmen from selected units will participate in the trial during their ICT.

      Will SAF make any more changes to the new IPPT format and scoring system?

      SAF does not plan to make any more changes to the new IPPT format and scoring system. SAF continuously reviews our fitness training system to ensure that we maintain our high standards.

      Is it easier to pass the IPPT now?

      Passing and excelling in IPPT will still require dedicated training and effort by servicemen. However with the simpler and more motivating format and scoring system, servicemen will be more motivated to train.

      Why is there a need for a new scoring system?

      The intention of the new scoring system is to motivate our servicemen to excel in all the test stations. We want to encourage everyone to train to their maximum potential.

      Why did SAF/HT move towards a 3-year age band?

      We recognise that a 3-year age band will provide a better performance-to-age match compared to the current 5-year age band.

      How well will this new IPPT structure reflect fitness levels of our soldiers/HT NSmen/NSFs?

      The 3 stations provide a good measurement of basic physical fitness as it focuses on the three main body parts. When viewed in totality with SAF's other combat fitness regimes such as loaded route marches, VRE and SOC/VOC, it is reflective of the fitness levels of our soldiers.

      For the Home Team, the new IPPT structure is a good assessment of the basic physical fitness of Home Team NSmen/NSFs. In addition, Home Team NSmen/NSFs have to undergo certification and proficiency tests such as the Police Defence Tactics and Hazmat Rescue Certification Test to ensure that they meet the physical demands of frontline operations.

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    • Enhancements to NS IPPT Management & Training 

      July 2014

      The new NS IPPT Management system will be in effect from 1 Sep 2014.

      Enhancements to the NS IPPT policies seek to ease administrative constraints to better support NSmen in managing their fitness and other commitments. The key changes are as follows:

      a.   Extension of IPPT/IPT/RT windows to 12 months.
      b.   Increase in monetary incentives for good IPPT performance.

      Concurrently, the SAF will improve IPT and RT fitness training in the Fitness Conditioning Centres (FCCs). From 1 Sep 14, all Fitness Conditioning Centres (FCCs) will be providing a greater variety of training and specialised fitness classes.

      As part of SAF's continuous efforts to review the fitness training system, a new IPPT format that is simpler to administer and simpler for servicemen to train for will be introduced. A pilot implementation involving selected Army NS and Active units (i.e. at least 3,000 active and NS participants from various age groups, vocations and gender) will be conducted from Sep to Nov 2014.

      THE ENHANCED NS IPPT SYSTEM

      (With Effect From 1 September 2014)

      Enhancements with effect from 1 September 2014:

      1.    Pictorial diagrams of the current and new NS IPPT management system are as follows:

      a.    The IPPT window has been extended from 9 months to 12 months. In this window, NSmen must attempt and pass their IPPT test. Alternatively, they can volunteer for a 10-session IPT programme. They will exit the IPT programme if they (1) complete 10 sessions of IPT; or (2) meet their Personal Performance Targets.

      Example 1:

      My birthday is on 1 January.
       
      Old system: my IPPT window is 9-months long: 1 January 2015 to 30 September 2015.
       
      New IPPT system: my IPPT window is 12-months long: 1 January 2015 to 31 December 2015.
       
      b.    The RT window has been extended from 3 months to 12 months. In this window, NSmen must complete their 20-session RT programme. They will exit the RT programme if they (1) complete 20 sessions of RT; or (2) pass IPPT during the stipulated RT-IPPT sessions.
       
      Example 2:
       
      My birthday is on 1 January.
       
      Old system: my RT window is 3-months long: 1 October 2015 to 31 December 2015.
       
      New IPPT system: my new RT window is 12-months long : 1 January 2016 to 31 December 2016.

      2.    The quantum for the IPPT monetary incentives has been enhanced. The revised quantum is applicable to NSmen with birthday windows starting from 1 Sep 2014. For example, if your birthday window starts on 1 Sep 2014, you will be eligible for $500 if you attain Gold award. However, if your birthday window starts on 31 Aug, you will still be subjected to the old system, and you will receive $400 if you attain Gold, even if you take the IPPT after 1 Sep.

      3.    NSmen who do not perform IPPT and/or RT will continue to be disciplinarily dealt with.

      Transition to new IPPT system

      4.    As at 1 September 2014, NSmen who are still in their IPPT window will enjoy an automatic extension of their IPPT window by 3 months. Those within their 3-month RT window will have an extended RT window (i.e. remaining RT window + next 12-month window).

       a.    Example 3:
      My birthday is on 1 August. On 1 September 2014, I am 1 month into my IPPT window.

      After extension, my new IPPT window will be 12-months long. It will be until 30 Jul 2015 instead of 30 April 2015. I will need to complete either my 10-session IPT program or perform at least 1 IPPT test.

      b.    Example 4:
      My birthday is on 1 January and I failed my IPPT. On 1 September 2014, I am in my RT window.

      After extension, my new RT window will be from 1 September 2014 to 31 December 2015 (i.e. remaining RT window + 12-months) instead of 31 December 2014. I will need to complete 20 sessions of RT in this new window or pass an IPPT during a stipulated RT-IPPT session.

      5.    One-time Reset of Default Offences.  NSmen with existing offences and charges are allowed a one-time opportunity to reset all offences by completing their IPPT requirements during this transition.

      a.    Example 5:
      My birthday is on 1 January and I failed my IPPT. I have defaulted my RT for my past 2 windows and have been charged. After extension, my new RT window will be from 1 Sep 2014 to 31 Dec 2015. If I complete my 20 sessions of RT in this RT window, my 2 existing default counts in the system will be reset to zero. If I default my RT again, I will be disciplinarily dealt with.

      6.    Please refer to the advisory via the IPPT Booking System at NS Portal from 1 Sep 2014 onwards for your IPPT status.

      NEW IPPT FORMAT AND SCORING SYSTEM

      BACKGROUND

      1.    Fitness is an important element of soldiering. The SAF constantly reviews our training system, including physical training regimes and physical fitness tests, to ensure that they are relevant and effective. Starting from 1 Sep 2014, the SAF will launch a pilot implementation of a new and simpler Individual Physical Proficiency Test (IPPT) format, which will be accompanied by a new scoring system. The new IPPT format is expected to be fully implemented across the SAF in 2015.

      KEY FEATURES OF THE NEW IPPT FORMAT AND SCORING SYSTEM

      2.    A simpler three-station IPPT format to encourage personal ownership of fitness.  The new three-station test format will comprise a push-up test, a sit-up test, and a 2.4km run. These stations will measure the strength and cardiovascular fitness of our servicemen. This new and simpler format was designed to allow servicemen to train and maintain their fitness, without the need for specialised technique or equipment. Fitness is a personal responsibility. This simpler test format will further motivate our servicemen to take greater ownership of their fitness, and incorporate these exercises into their daily routine to maintain their fitness.


      Table 1.  New IPPT Format.

      3.    New scoring system to motivate personal excellence. The SAF will also introduce a new scoring system to accompany the new IPPT format. Servicemen will be allocated points for their performance in each of the three stations. The maximum number of points servicemen may earn for each station are 50 points for the 2.4km run station, and 25 points each for the Push Up and Sit Up stations. The maximum number of points a serviceman can achieve in the IPPT is 100. The points will be added together to form a final score, which will determine the serviceman's individual fitness standard. Similar to the current IPPT, servicemen will need to score the requisite number of points to Pass, Pass with monetary incentive, and to achieve the Silver and Gold IPPT awards. Active servicemen will continue to be held to a higher passing standard because fitness training is incorporated into their work and training routine. To ensure the high standards of our elite combat troops - Commando, Diver, and Guards will be held to a higher Gold IPPT standard.

      4.    This new scoring system will encourage servicemen to do their best for each of the stations. The better they perform in the stations, the more points they will be awarded. The flexibility of the new scoring system will motivate servicemen to exercise greater ownership on how they will train for their IPPT, allowing them to tap on their individual strengths to do well.


      Table 2. New IPPT Standards.

      5.    Shorter age categories for a better performance-to-age match.  As part of this physical fitness review, we will also shorten our age categories, from 5-year bands to 3-year bands. This shorter age categories allow us to better differentiate the different age groups of our servicemen, and is a better performance-to-age match. Instead of having to perform to the same standards in a five year age block, servicemen will perform to a new standard every three years. This shorter age category will be more sensitive to the effects of age on the physical fitness of our servicemen.

      EXAMPLE

      6.    Age Group 3 Pass example.  For a 25 to 27 year old NSmen to achieve Pass he would be required to perform 16 Push Ups in 1 min (6 pts), 30 Sit Ups in 1 min (14 pts) and complete his 2.4km run in 12min 40s (31 pts). With this performance, he would accumulate a total score of 51 points, which would make him eligible for the Pass Award.

      7.    Age Group 6 Gold Award example. For a 34 to 36 year old serviceman aiming to achieve Gold award, he would be required to perform 35 Push Ups in 1 min (20 pts), 35 Sit Ups in 1 min (20 pts) and complete his 2.4km run in 10min 40s (41 pts). With this performance, he would accumulate a total score of 81 points, which would make him eligible for the Gold Award.

      IMPLEMENTATION

      8.    Pilot implementation. Army will conduct a pilot implementation from Sep to Nov 14 to fine-tune the administration of the new IPPT. Selected Active and NS units will participate in this phase. At least 3,000 servicemen and servicewomen of different vocations and age groups will be represented in the pilot implementation.



      Table 3. Push Up Scoring Table.

       

      Table 4. Sit Up Scoring Table.



      Table 5. 2.4km Run Scoring Table.

      Frequently Answered Questions

      What is the current NS IPPT Management System?

      The current NS IPPT management system was implemented on 1 April 2011. Under this system, NSmen are required to pass their IPPT within the first 9 months of their birthday window. Those who fail or default on their IPPT have to attend 20 sessions of Remedial Training (RT) in the last 3 months of their birthday window. NSmen can also volunteer for IPPT Preparatory Training (IPT) in the first 9 months of their birthday window, and will fulfil their IPPT requirement for the year if they meet their Personal Performance Targets (PPTs)1. Those who fail to meet their PPTs have to attend 8 sessions of RT in the last 3 months of their birthday window.

      1PPTs are intermediate standards raised progressively at an annual rate towards an IPPT Pass. The PPT standard is derived from the results of the IPPT conducted during the first session of IPT.

      What are the key changes under the enhanced NS IPPT Management System?

      With effect from 1 Sep 2014, NSmen will be given 12 months to attempt and pass their IPPT. Alternatively, NSmen that require help can volunteer for a 10-session IPPT Preparatory Training (IPT). NSmen who pass their IPPT or complete IPT will proceed to either IPPT or IPT in their next 12-month birthday window. NSmen who fail or default IPPT or IPT will be subject to Remedial Training (RT). They will be required to complete their RT programme within their subsequent 12-month birthday windows. NSmen who volunteer for IPT will be considered to have met their IPPT requirement for the year if they (1) meet their Personal Performance Targets (PPT) at any point in the programme; or (2) complete 10 sessions of IPT within their birthday window. NSmen on IPT are advised to attend training at least once a week continuously for 10 sessions to obtain the benefits of the training regime.

      What are the specific changes to the IPPT Management System?

      a.    Extension of IPPT/IPT to 12 months.   The IPPT/IPT window will be extended from the current 9 months to 12 months, to give NSmen more time to attempt and pass IPPT or complete IPT.

      b.    Extension of RT window to 12 months.   Instead of the last 3 months in their present window, NSmen who default or fail the IPPT will be given 12 months in their next birthday window to complete 20 sessions of RT. This extension is to enable NSmen to better manage their other commitments so that they can meet the RT requirements. NSmen are advised to attend RT at least once a week continuously for the duration of his RT in order to obtain the benefits of the training regime.

      What are the changes to IPPT Preparatory Training?

      The IPT programme will continue to be available to NSmen who need help with IPPT training. Participants will be able to exit the programme upon meeting their PPTs. To better recognise the efforts put in by NSmen to train for IPPT, with effect from 1 Sep 14, service pay for IPT programme will be accorded to NSmen whose birthday windows start from 1 Sep 14. NSmen who complete the requisite 10 sessions of IPT within the IPPT window but fail to meet PPTs will no longer be subject to 8 sessions of RT. To motivate NSmen to participate in as many IPT sessions as they can, NSmen who default on IPT will be subjected to 20 – D sessions of RT in the next window, where D is equal to the number of IPT sessions that the NSman participated in, in the preceding 12-month birthday window.

      Is there a change in determining whether NSmen have met their IPT/RT requirement?

      NSmen who have failed or defaulted IPPT are liable for RT. NSmen who have defaulted IPPT will be liable for 20 sessions of RT during their 12-month RT window (new system with effect from 1 Sep 14). To differentiate between IPPT failures and defaulters, under the new system, failures will be liable to 20-D sessions (as opposed to 20 sessions), where D is equivalent to the number of IPPT/IPT attempts made in the preceding window.

      NSmen who volunteer for IPT will be considered to have met their annual IPT requirements if they (1) pass IPPT; (2) meet their Personal Performance Targets anytime during their IPT programme; or (3) complete 10 sessions of IPT during their 12-month IPPT/IPT window (with effect from 1 Sep). They will no longer be liable for 8-sessions of RT if they do not meet their Personal Performance Targets by the 10th session. This is to recognise that servicemen have put in their best efforts to train and meet their fitness targets in volunteering for and completing the 10-session programme.

      Under the enhanced NS IPPT management system are NSmen in RT allowed to participate in non-ICT IPPT that are not the stipulated RT-IPPT tests?

      In the new system, NSmen in the RT programme will only be allowed to participate in ICT-IPPT or RT-IPPT on the stipulated 8th, 14th and 20th RT sessions. NSmen are given sufficient time to attempt and pass their IPPT during the 12-month IPPT window. NSmen that are in the RT programme are deemed to be servicemen that require help to train for and pass IPPT. As such, it is mandatory for NSmen in the RT programme to participate in at least 7 training sessions before they are allowed to attempt the IPPT.

      Monetary Incentive


      What are the changes in monetary incentive for IPPT performance?

      To motivate personnel to do their best and maintain a high level of physical fitness, the quantum of the awards will be increased by $100. The new quantum will apply to NSmen with birthday windows starting from 1 Sep 2014; NSFs whose IPPT windows start from 1 Sep 2014; and Regulars for tests taken from 1 Apr 2015.


      Quantum for IPPT monetary incentives

      Disciplinary Framework

      Under the enhanced NS IPPT management system, what happens when NSmen fail or default their IPPT?

      Currently, both IPPT defaulters and failures are subject to 20 sessions of RT within the 3-month RT window. In the enhanced system, there will be greater differentiation between IPPT Failures and Defaulters. IPPT failures will be subjected to fewer sessions of RT in the 12-month RT window. NSmen who fail will be subjected to 20 – D sessions of RT, where D is equal to the number of IPPT attempted in the previous 12-month birthday window. For defaulters, they will have to complete 20 sessions. Within the RT window, servicemen will only be allowed to exit RT if they attain the Pass standard at the stipulated test sessions (i.e. 8th, 14th and 20th sessions).

      What is SAF doing to deter recalcitrant defaulters?

      IPPT is an annual requirement for all IPPT-eligible NSmen. NSmen who default their IPPT will be subjected to disciplinary action. A new disciplinary framework will be implemented from 1 Jan 15. Currently, NSmen with three such offences or more will be subject to either a Fine or be sent to Detention Barracks. Under the new framework, NSmen with three such offences will be subjected to Fine and a five-day residential In-Camp-Training (Physical Training) [ICT(PT)]. The ICT(PT) is a more constructive way to help NSmen to train for their fitness. The ICT(PT) focuses on teaching servicemen on the different types of fitness modalities and fitness habits.

      New IPPT format

      What is the impetus for the new IPPT format?


      Physical fitness of our servicemen is tested using the IPPT protocol. Prior to 2009, combat fitness was assessed using our Standard Obstacle Course and route marches. Since then, the Army has strengthened combat fitness training with the introduction of Vocation-Related Exercises and Vocation Obstacle Courses to meet our new operational demands. With this in place, it is now timely to review our physical fitness test protocol and standards.

      Will the Home Team be implementing the new IPPT format?

      Yes, the Home Team will be adopting the same IPPT format as the SAF. The Home Team has assessed that the new IPPT format would meet their needs for assessing the physical fitness of Home Team NSmen/NSFs.

      When will the trial for the new IPPT format be held?

      The trial will be conducted by the Army Fitness Centre from Sep - Nov 2014. It will involve at least 3,000 Active and NS personnel across different gender, age groups and vocations. NSmen from selected units will participate in the trial during their ICT.

      Will SAF make any more changes to the new IPPT format and scoring system?

      SAF does not plan to make any more changes to the new IPPT format and scoring system. SAF continuously reviews our fitness training system to ensure that we maintain our high standards.

      Is it easier to pass the IPPT now?

      Passing and excelling in IPPT will still require dedicated training and effort by servicemen. However with the simpler and more motivating format and scoring system, servicemen will be more motivated to train.

      Why is there a need for a new scoring system?

      The intention of the new scoring system is to motivate our servicemen to excel in all the test stations. We want to encourage everyone to train to their maximum potential.

      Why did SAF/HT move towards a 3-year age band?

      We recognise that a 3-year age band will provide a better performance-to-age match compared to the current 5-year age band.

      How well will this new IPPT structure reflect fitness levels of our soldiers/HT NSmen/NSFs?

      The 3 stations provide a good measurement of basic physical fitness as it focuses on the three main body parts. When viewed in totality with SAF's other combat fitness regimes such as loaded route marches, VRE and SOC/VOC, it is reflective of the fitness levels of our soldiers.

      For the Home Team, the new IPPT structure is a good assessment of the basic physical fitness of Home Team NSmen/NSFs. In addition, Home Team NSmen/NSFs have to undergo certification and proficiency tests such as the Police Defence Tactics and Hazmat Rescue Certification Test to ensure that they meet the physical demands of frontline operations.

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    • Under the Enlistment Act, NS-liable persons are enlisted at the earliest opportunity upon turning 18 years old. For those who are studying, MINDEF does allow some flexibility for them to complete their full-time studies up to the GCE 'A' Levels or Polytechnic Diploma (or their equivalent), both locally and overseas, before enlisting for NS. Those who have already embarked on their full-time studies but who do not meet the deferment conditions, will have to disrupt their studies and be enlisted for NS at the earliest opportunity scheduled by the Central Manpower Base (CMPB), including those who take up Singapore Permanent Residency in the midst of their studies.


      Local Studies in Government Schools
         
      GCE 'A' Level Studies and International Baccalaureate (IB) Studies

      NS-liable persons will be granted deferment for GCE 'A' Level and IB studies (and their equivalent) at Junior Colleges/ Millennia Institute/ Integrated Programme (IP) schools if they are able to commence the course* before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year.

      * For NS-liable persons who are pursuing their GCE 'A' Levels or IB in the IP schools, the deferment cut-off age will apply to the 5th year of study.

      Exceptions may be considered for students who do not meet these deferment cut-off ages, but are able to gain admission into Junior Colleges/ Millennia Institute/ IP schools.


      NS-liable persons who are returning from overseas and who wish to pursue studies in Junior Colleges/ Millennia Institute/ IP schools must seek prior approval from CMPB. They must do so before applying through the Ministry of Education (MOE)'s School Placement Exercise for Returning Singaporeans - Junior Colleges and Millennia Institute (SPERS-JC/MI), or before applying directly to the Junior Colleges/ Millennia Institute/ IP Schools. Persons who are deemed to have already attained a first education bar qualification (defined as GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications), be it locally or overseas, will not be granted deferment to pursue another first education bar qualification or another qualification below first education bar.

      Persons who have failed their General Paper (GP)/ Knowledge & Inquiry (KI) or obtained less than 3 H2 passes (excluding KI) in one sitting of the GCE 'A' Level examination will be considered for further deferment to repeat their GCE 'A' Level studies on a full-time basis, subject to one repeat only. Persons who have failed to attain the IB qualification will also be considered for further deferment to repeat their IB studies on a full-time basis, subject to one repeat only.

      Polytechnic Diploma Studies

      NS-liable persons will be granted deferment for Polytechnic Diploma studies (including Polytechnic Diploma through the Polytechnic Foundation Programme) and its equivalent qualifications (e.g. courses at the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts (NAFA) or the LaSalle College of the Arts) if they are able to commence the course before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year.

      NS-liable persons who graduated with NITEC/Higher NITEC qualification from ITE Colleges will be granted deferment for Polytechnic Diploma studies and its equivalent qualifications if they are able to commence the course before 21 years old as at 1st January of the course commencement year. Applications for deferment from ITE graduates who are above 21 years old as at 1st January of their course commencement year will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

      NS-liable persons who are returning from overseas and who wish to pursue Polytechnic Diploma studies and its equivalent qualifications must seek prior approval from CMPB before applying for their intended course of study. Persons who are deemed to have already attained a first education bar qualification (defined as GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications), be it locally or overseas, will not be granted deferment to pursue another first education bar qualification or another qualification below first education bar.

      Institute of Technical Education (ITE) Diploma Studies

      NS-liable persons who completed NITEC or Higher NITEC studies at ITE Colleges, will be granted deferment to pursue the Technical Engineer Diploma (TED) or Technical Diploma (TD) programmes at ITE Colleges if they are able to commence the course before 21 years old, as at 1st January of the course commencement year. They will be granted deferment to complete the academic phase only, and will be enlisted for full-time NS at the earliest opportunity upon completion of the academic phase. Deferment will not be granted for work attachments and internships. Applications for deferment from ITE graduates who are above 21 years old as at 1st January of their course commencement year will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

      NS-liable persons who are returning from overseas and who wish to pursue ITE Diploma studies must seek prior approval from CMPB before applying for their intended course of study. Persons who are deemed to have already attained a first education bar qualification (defined as GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications), be it locally or overseas, will not be granted deferment to pursue another first education bar qualification or another qualification below first education bar.

      NITEC and Higher NITEC Studies

      NS-liable persons will be granted deferment for NITEC or Higher NITEC courses at ITE Colleges if they are able to commence the course before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year.

      NS-liable persons who graduated with NITEC qualification from ITE Colleges will also be granted deferment for Higher NITEC courses if they are able to commence the course at ITE Colleges before 20 years old, as at 1st January of the course commencement year.

      NS-liable persons who are returning from overseas and who wish to pursue NITEC or Higher NITEC studies at ITE Colleges must seek prior approval from CMPB before applying for their intended course of study. Persons who are deemed to have already attained a first education bar qualification (defined as GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications), be it locally or overseas, will not be granted deferment to pursue another first education bar qualification or another qualification below first education bar.

      GCE 'O' and 'N' Level Courses

      NS-liable persons will generally be granted deferment to pursue GCE 'O' and 'N' Level studies at government, government-aided or independent secondary schools.

      An extension of deferment may be granted for those who wish to repeat their GCE 'N' or 'O' Level studies on a full-time basis, subject to one repeat only.

      Local Private Courses

      NS-liable persons who graduated before September 2011 may be granted deferment to pursue full-time studies (up to the GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications) at private institutions registered with the Council for Private Education (CPE), if they are able to commence the course before 18 years old, as at 1st January of the course commencement year. NS-liable persons graduating from September 2011 onwards may be granted deferment to pursue full-time studies (up to the GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications) at private institutions registered with the CPE, if they are able to commence their courses before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 & ITE students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year. The higher cut-off age will apply to courses commencing from 1st January 2012 onwards.

      Deferment for private courses will be considered on a stage-by-stage basis (i.e. a Certificate course and a Diploma course, if packaged together, will be treated as separate courses for the purpose of granting deferment). A new application for deferment must be made before the commencement of a new stage of studies. Deferment for the new stage of studies will be subject to the same cut-off age stated in the preceding paragraph.

      Overseas Studies
         
      NS-liable persons who graduated before September 2011 may be granted deferment to pursue full-time overseas studies (up to the GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or their equivalent qualifications) if they are able to commence the course before 18 years old, as at 1st January of the course commencement year. NS-liable persons graduating from September 2011 onwards may be granted deferment to pursue full-time overseas studies (up to the GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or their equivalent qualifications) if they are able to commence their courses before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 & ITE students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year. The higher cut-off age will apply to courses commencing from 1st January 2012 onwards.

      NS-liable persons will be required to apply for an exit permit for overseas trips of 3 months and longer and will be required to furnish a bond of $75,000 or an amount equivalent to 50% of the combined annual gross income of both parents for the preceding year, whichever is higher.

      Application for Deferment
         
      NS-liable persons may apply for deferment online at the NS portal (http://www.ns.sg) during NS registration and pre-enlistment documentation.

      Those applying for deferment to pursue local studies may be required to furnish documentary proof for verification upon CMPB's request. Upon CMPB's request, they will be required to submit to CMPB a letter from their school certifying their enrolment, their course of study, as well as their course commencement and completion dates.

      Those applying for deferment to pursue overseas studies must submit to CMPB a letter from their school certifying their enrolment, their course of study as well as their course commencement and completion dates. In addition, they must submit their parents' Income Tax Notices of Assessment (both local and overseas) for the preceding year.

      Those who subsequently wish to pursue or switch to a new course or institution must seek prior approval from CMPB.

      Notes: The information provided in this website are general guidelines. For further details, you may wish to contact the NS Call Centre at [email protected] or Tel: 1800-3676767 (eNSNSNS).

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    • Medical Classification Centre

      Location and Operating Hours

      Our Address

      MCC is located at Level 1, CMPB Podium.

      Central Manpower Base (CMPB)
      3 Depot Road
      Singapore 109680

      Our Operating Hours


      Mondays - Fridays: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm

      Saturdays, Sundays and Public Holidays: Closed

      Pre-enlistment Medical Screening

      Prior to enlistment, all pre-enlistees have to undergo a thorough medical examination at the Medical Classification Centre (MCC) within the Central Manpower Base (CMPB). This examination allows the medical fitness of a pre-enlistee to be assessed and this subsequently determines his Physical Employment Status (PES).

      Medical Screening Appointment Preparations

      As part of the e-documentation, you are also required to select your preferred medical appointment date as well as to complete the medical questionnaire (e7F). You will need to go through the medical questionnaire form with your parents / guardian so that useful medical information about you is captured.

      To ensure that your medical experience with us is pleasant and that the overall screening process is not unnecessarily delayed, we have compiled a checklist for you:

      1. Print out a copy of the medical questionnaire (e7F) and ensure that your parent / guardian and you sign on the printed document. Bring the e7F on the day of your medical appointment at MCC.

       

      1. Avoid wearing contact lenses. Wear your spectacles as you will be required to undergo eye checks.

       

      1. Wear loose fitting clothes (e.g. shorts) to facilitate physical examination.

       

      1. Bring along any medical documents to support your existing medical condition (if any).

       

      1. Health Booklet (if any).


      Clinical Examinations

      The medical screening process takes on average 150 minutes to complete and there is a series of test that you will have to undertake.

      Registration Station

      At MCC Registration Counter, you will be required to submit your e7F. As a form of verification, you will be asked for your NRIC or any form of photo identification (e.g. driving license, school pass.)

      Clinical Laboratory Station

      At the Clinical Laboratory Station blood samples are drawn for G6PD, haemoglobin and blood group typing tests. Simple urine tests to detect the presence of blood, protein and glucose (sugar) will also be carried out for you at the Station.

      Dental Station

      At the Dental Station, the Dental Officer will carry out an oral examination and Dental Charting. A Dental X-ray or Orthopantomography (OPG) will also be conducted.

      X- ray Station

      A Chest x-ray (CXR) screening will also be conducted for you at the X-ray Station for the radiological assessment of your heart and lungs.

      Eye Station

      At the Eye Station routine eye tests are carried out to detect eye abnormalities and test your visual and refractive error.

      ENT (Ear, Nose & Throat) Station

      At ENT Station an audio test or audiogram will be conducted to detect hearing abnormalities.

      Station 6 (Clinical Examination Station)


      Station 6 is the Clinical Examination Station, you will undergo height, weight and blood pressure measurements. An electrocardiogram (ECG) will also be done for you in the ECG Room.

      After completion of all the clinical investigations and measurements, you will then be examined and evaluated by a Medical officer.


      Station 6 Counter (Post Clinical Screening)

      Once you have completed the above series of medical screening, you will be medically classified with a PES grading.

      Station 6 Counter will also issue instructions for the pre-enlistee if the pre-enlistee is to return to MCC for any further medical investigations.

      Other Services

      MCC Eye Clinic

      The Specialist Eye Clinic at MCC provides medical assessment for eye conditions. An appointment will be made for you during the screening procedure should it be deemed necessary. Please bring all documents regarding any known eye condition for your appointment.

      MCC ENT (Ear, Nose and Throat) Clinic)


      The Specialist ENT Clinic provides pre-enlistment assessment for ENT complaints. You will be informed if there is a need for you to attend this clinic.

      MCC Specialist Psychiatric Clinic


      The Specialist Psychiatric Clinic at MCC aims to assess the suitability of a pre-enlistee with regard to psychiatric conditions already known or discovered during the screening process. It is essential to have one parent accompany you should an appointment be made for you and it would greatly shorten the delay to enlistment if you bring all your pre-existing psychiatric medical records for your appointment.

      MCC Specialist Orthopedic Clinic

      The specialist orthopedic clinic has the purpose of grading a pre-enlistee with regard to any orthopedic problems. A medical officer will be in attendance together with a senior doctor from one of the restructured hospitals. Here we will grade you based on your orthopedic problems. Please bring all medical reports and X-ray films for this visit.

      Medical Review

      A pre-enlistee with any abnormalities noted during the medical screening will be required to undergo medical review. This can take several forms as appropriately decided by the Medical Officer.

      Referral to SAF Military Medicine Institute (MMI) / Government / Restructured Hospitals

      The pre-enlistee may be referred to SAF MMI, government / restructured hospitals for further investigations. If the referral is required, he will be given a set of documents to bring along as well as information regarding the date, time and venue.

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    • Those who are liable to serve national service but refuse are charged under the Enlistment Act. If convicted, they face three years' imprisonment and a fine of S$10,000.

      In parliament, Defence Minister provided some illustration of the punishments defaulters would face:

       

      • Where the default period exceeds two years but the defaulter is young enough to serve his full-time and operationally ready NS duties in full, MINDEF will press for a short jail sentence.

       

      • Where the defaulter has reached an age when he cannot serve his full-time NS in a combat vocation or fulfil his operationally ready NS obligations in full, a longer jail sentence to reflect the period of NS he has evaded may be appropriate.

       

      • Where the defaulter has reached an age when he cannot be called up for NS at all, a jail sentence up to the maximum of three years may be appropriate.

       

      Each year, a small number of people are convicted for their failure to enlist or refusal to be conscripted. Most of them were Jehovah's Witnesses, who are usually court-martialled and sentenced to three years' imprisonment, but they are usually held in a low-security detention facility and separated from other conscription offenders. The government does not consider conscientious objection to be a legal reason for refusal to serve NS. Since 1972, the publications of Jehovah's Witnesses have been outlawed in Singapore. This is commonly misinterpreted to mean that Jehovah's Witnesses themselves are outlawed in Singapore.

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    • NS have counselling hotlines for you to call if need arises.
      The counsellors are experienced professionals.

      You can call them at the following counselling hotlines:

      • SAF : 1800-278 0022 (SAF Counselling Hotline)
      • SPF : 1800-255 1151 (Police Psychology Service Department)
      • SCDF: 1800-286 6666 (SCDF Counselling Hotline)

       

      If you think you have been treated unfairly, you can bring up the case to your Commander. We will listen to your case. Do remember to bring along all facts and supporting documents.

      We will do our best to address your concerns. Servicemen are to seek redress through proper channels. Together, we can address your issue more expeditiously.

      ================================================================

       

      COUNSELLING

      The SAF seeks to promote the well-being of every serviceman by providing
      counselling support for those whom might be facing difficulties coping with their
      personal or work/training related problems. Servicemen who are experiencing
      difficulties can seek help through the avenues described below.


      Commander interviews of all recruits are conducted within 48 hours of enlistment into full-time NS. Regular interviews are subsequently conducted on a monthly basis during the PTP/BMT phase. Special interviews are also granted upon request. Servicemen can highlight their difficulties during these interviews for assistance.

      Orientation Officers identify, assist and counsel BMT recruits with adjustment
      and/or other personal problems.

      NS SAF Counselling Hotline is a 24-hour confidential telephone
      counselling service provided by the SAF Counselling Centre. Manned by
      trained counselling personnel, the SAF Counselling Hotline offers a crisis
      and telephone counselling service to all servicemen. Callers may
      choose to remain anonymous. Face to face counselling is also available
      at the SAF Counselling Centre upon request/referral.

      SAF Paracounselling Scheme
      complements other existing counselling
      services and provides another avenue of help at the unit level for those who
      need help to deal more effectively with their problems. Paracounsellors are
      specially selected, trained by and work closely under the professional guidance
      and support of counsellors from the SAF Counselling Centre. Paracounsellors
      can be identified through their identification badges as well as through publicity
      posters displayed in their units.

      ================================================================

       

      Being psychologically prepared is all about knowing what to expect and being prepared for it.

      To be better prepared, you can participate in Total Defence activities and Open Houses organised by the SAF/SPF/SCDF.

      Perhaps you should also talk to your family members and friends who have lived the NS experience. The more you discuss with others, the more comfortable and mentally prepared you’ll become.

      Because NS life is different from civilian life before enlistment, there are many adjustments you need to make.

      A good way to cope is to get support from your buddy and fellow recruits. They are going through the same tough training as you, so talking to one another will help relieve some tension.

      In most evenings during your leisure time, you’ll also have some time to call your family or loved ones to talk. They can give you emotional support during NS.

      You can have a one-on-one interview sessions with your officer to highlight any problems you may have. If you have a personal or family problem that need to be addressed, do let the officer know—he may be able to give you some advice or time off to settle your problems.

      Life in NS revolves around structure, routine and discipline. This helps us stay united as a uniformed organisation as well as imparts the rigours necessary to protect our nation and citizens.

      This does not mean there is just work and no play. In fact, after a few weeks in NS and you’ll find new friends and new reasons to smile!

      As a soldier, one of the biggest adjustments you’ll have to make quickly is in regimentation and discipline.

      Being in a uniformed organisation, you’ll have to obey orders from your superiors. Thus some of you may feel a sudden lack of freedom to do what you want and you may find yourself having difficulties accepting authority initially.

      Regimentation and discipline build strong character and toughness, so that you’ll be tough enough to handle difficult combat, crime-fighting or rescue situations without giving up or breaking down.

      When you first enlist into NS, you may have concerns of being in a new territory, with new faces and new things to do. But don’t let this get to you. Just remember the saying that “when the going gets tough, the tough gets going”.

      Following are some tips on what you can do to prepare yourself psychologically:

      • Adopt a positive perception
      • Build up physical stamina
      • Develop good working attitude and habits
      • Overcome psychological stress
      • Adopt teamwork spirit
      • Learn to be independent
      • Set realistic expectations

      You can also speak to your friends or family members who have been through NS. Ask them to share their stories. The sharing will help you reduce some of your fears, uncertainties and doubts.

      During NS you’ll be living with different people.

      Because these people come from different backgrounds, they may not think like you do or react to situations like you would. Instead of trying to select your type of people, you should cherish the diversity. This is a chance for you to learn more about your fellow mates and their cultures.

      You’ll find that you have many opportunities to absorb the different cultures—during training, eating, chatting or just seeing and listening. Take these opportunities and learn from people around you, you’ll have a much better appreciation of Singapore’s cultural diversity.

      Samaritans of Singapore (SOS): 1800-2214444

      Singapore Association for Mental Health: 1800-2837019

      Sage Counselling Centre: 1800-5555555

      Care Corner Mandarin Counselling: 1800-3535800

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    • Source: www.ns.sg

      Military Justice System in the SAF

      1. Overview
      The military justice system in the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) is expected to treat every service personnel fairly and equally, regardless of race, rank or vocation.

       
      2. Multi-levelled Approach

      The military justice system is based on the SAF Act, which was implemented in 1972. All servicemen are subjected to the SAF Act, SAF Regulations, and orders of whatever form issued pursuant to them.

      While discipline is paramount in the military, not all offences committed by SAF servicemen are dealt with by formal investigations and charges. Essentially, offenders can be dealt with either by way of informal or formal punishment systems.

       
      3. Informal Punishment System
      Commanders are empowered to mete out informal punishments like push-ups and weekend confinement to servicemen who have committed disciplinary breaches, like being late, sluggish, or improperly dressed.

       

      4. Formal Punishment System
      If the offence that a serviceman committed is of a more serious nature, he may be formally dealt with by his disciplinary officer by way of a summary trial, or brought before a subordinate military court (more commonly known as the General Court Martial or GCM).

      (a) Summary Trial

      The offences that can be dealt with by summary trial are essentially military offences, such as absence without leave (AWOL), non-compliance with lawful orders or insubordination.

      Depending on the rank of the serviceman in question, and the type of the disciplinary body hearing the case, the possible sentences that may be imposed can vary, and these can include fines or detention.

      The summary trial is carried out in accordance with relevant SAF regulations, and the records of the summary trial are sent to the office of the Director, Legal Services of the SAF.

      (b) General Court Martial

      The General Court Martial exists as a separate forum from that of the summary trial. Unlike the summary trial, the GCM can deal with a wider range of offences, and can impose a wider range of punishments including imprisonment and discharge, on top of sentences like detention and fines. The GCM is also a more public and open forum, and its proceedings are conducted using similar legal rules and procedures as those used in a civil criminal court.

      Generally, only serious offences investigated by the Military Police Command, and which are referred to the office of the Director of Legal Services, will result in the accused serviceman being charged in a GCM. In such a case, a military prosecutor will draw up a formal charge sheet and present it before the GCM.

      General Courts Martial can be further sub-divided into two categories, namely the Panel Courts Martial - consisting of a President and usually two other members, and Judge Courts Martial - consisting of a single President only.

      Currently, the practice is for military offences to be heard by Panel Courts Martial, while civil offences like misuse of drugs and penal code offences may be dealt with by a Judge Court Martial.


      The current policy is also for an NSman, who is or was a District Judge in the Subordinate Courts, to preside in a GCM. There are currently 10 NSmen who have been appointed by the Armed Forces Council to perform duty as President of a court martial. They are rostered by the Registrar of the Subordinate Military Court to hear cases during their in-camp training. In the case of a Panel Court Martial, the other two members are rostered from among some 155 military officers appointed by the Chief of Defence Force.

       
      5. Ways to Seek Redress

      There are numerous safeguards and avenues set out in the military justice system for an SAF serviceman to seek redress if he is unhappy about the punishment imposed on him.

      Generally, a serviceman who is dissatisfied with an informal punishment meted out to him may request a higher level commander to review the punishment, or request for formal disciplinary dealing.

      In the case of a summary trial, a serviceman brought before the disciplinary officer may elect instead to be tried by a court martial. Alternatively, an aggrieved serviceman may request that his conviction or punishment imposed at the summary trial be reviewed by MINDEF's Director Manpower (a delegated authority of the Armed Forces Council).

      In the case of a GCM, a serviceman may choose to be represented by a lawyer or an SAF defending officer if his case will be heard by a court martial. The SAF has about 200 trained defending officers. While an SAF defending officer comes free to the serviceman, he has to bear the cost of engaging a lawyer. At the end of the trial, a serviceman who is dissatisfied with the decision of the court martial may petition the Reviewing Authority (the AFC or a committee of its members) for a review of his case. The serviceman can also appeal to the Military Court of Appeal (MCA) for a reconsideration of his conviction, or his sentence, or both.

      The MCA, when convened to hear an appeal, sits as a panel of five members. Heading the MCA is a President, who is appointed by the Chief Justice. By law, he must be a person qualified to be a Judge of the Supreme Court. The current President of the MCA is Justice Choo Han Teck. Four other members - two civilian members who are qualified legal practitioners with at least five years experience each, and two senior military officers - make up the rest of the MCA. The MCA is the highest court in the military justice system.

       
      6. Impartial Hearings
      It is important to recognise that the GCM and the MCA are tribunals headed by presidents who are outside the SAF chain of command.

      Being an "outsider", the president of these forums will hear the case impartially like any other civil criminal case. The proceedings in the GCM and the MCA are also heard in a public forum, and these military courts adopt many of the same legal procedures and safeguards as that used in the civil criminal courts. All servicemen formally charged with an offence can bring their case to these forums.

       

       

      Singapore Armed Forces Military Police Command
      (SAFMPC/ 新加坡武装部队宪兵司令部)

      The formation is headed by the Command Headquarters which oversees its daily operations, and supported by four units specialising in the various specific operational responsibilities of the SAF MPC.

      The four units are:

      Military Police Enforcement Unit (MPEU): The unit consists of the Law Enforcement and Ceremonial Company (LECC), the Security Operation Unit (SOU) and the Special Security and Protection (SSP) Branch. It is the active wing of the SAF MPC and executes most of the operational and ceremonial duties and roles carried out by the SAF MPC.

      The LECC was formed by combining the former Active Provost Company (APC) and the former Zone Provost Company (ZPC). Its duties include most of the important ceremonial duties required within the SAF as previously handled by the APC, and a traffic platoon which ensures the compliance of traffic regulations by military personnel on the road as well as performing escort duties. It also performs regular raids for contraband and/or miscreants on various camps of the SAF as was conducted by the ZPC. Enforcement Platoon (also known as Platoon 2) performs regular operations in residential areas, workplaces, and many public places such as shopping centres, clubs and eating outlets to apprehend desertersAWOLoffenders, drug addicts and other military criminals. They work closely with the Singapore Police Force and are often in very dangerous situations and are extremely well trained for handling the varied scenarios that they find themselves in. This is also the platoon that enforces the public image of the SAF by booking offenders who smoke in uniform and commit other offences in uniform while in the eye of the public. It is worth noting that they perform undercover security operations for high-key events like the National Day Parade and the Youth Olympic Games. The security of Mowbray Station is overseen by a platoon who is also in charge of registering and detaining suspects and offenders of military crimes in holding cells. The station is similar to a civilian police station and it is usually the first stop for detainees before their transfer to the detention barracks after conviction in military courts, or a temporary holding cell for servicemen placed under Closed Arrest. The investigative branch for the SAF, the Special Investigation Branch (SIB) investigates higher-order military crimes that requires specialised handling. Since 31 December 8, MPEU has heralded the inclusion of a new branch within its ranks. The Security Support and Protection (SSP) Branch is involved in sensitive operations so no further information is available.

      SAF Detention Barracks (SAFDB): Headed by a commandant, DB consists of MPs in charge of supervision of detainees of the SAF who have been convicted in military courts.

      Military Police Training School (MPTS): Formerly known as the School of Provost, MPTS is in charge of equipping trainees with necessary and fundamental military policing skills as well as instilling in them a high standard of discipline through the vocational courses and specialised courses such as the Silent Precision Drill Courses. MPTS also legislation courses for senior commanders all over the SAF. In addition, the SAF Military Working Dog Unit is a wing under MPTS and it is in charge of all dog training and doctrine matters of the SAF.

      SAF MP Command Head Quarters (HQ): The Head Quarters of the Command comprises various branches, namely the Human Resource (HR), Intelligences and Security Branch (ISB), General Staff Branch (GS), the Special Investigation Branch (SIB) and Logistic Branch. Each branch is headed by a branch head who serves concurrently as the Command's Manpower, Intelligence, Ops and Training and Logistics Officer.

      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      FAQs

      SAF Detention Barracks

      1. Are the detainees being medically taken care of?

      Primary health care of detainees is of utmost importance to us. All detainees will be given adequate medical care during their incarceration. Our medical services are also supported by the Tengah Airbase Medical Centre, NUH and also Changi General Hospital if the need arises.

      2. Can I write a letter to a detainee?
      Yes.

      3. I have just received a Visit Notification Letter, but the schedule visit date stated therein has already lapsed. How can I visit the detainee?
      You can contact the Records Office at 6424 6666 to arrange for another appointment date.

      4. Can anyone besides the parent unit of the detainees pick up the detainee on the day of their release?
      At no time shall the detainee/military prisoner be released from the detention barracks/military prison as the case may be, to his family or any other party.

      5.. Can the detainee write letters while serving detention in Detention Barracks?
      Every detainee and military prisoner shall be allowed to write one letter per week.

      6. What are the visiting days and what is the duration of the visit?
      Visiting days are on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, and the first appointment starts from 1.30pm and ends at 3.00pm. Visitors are allowed to visit the detainee for 30 minutes.

      7. How many visits is the serviceman entitled to?
      Each serviceman is entitled to one visit per week.

      8. What happens if the family members can't turn up on the date specified for their first visit?
      The family members can call Records Office of SAF Detention Barracks at 6424 6666 and arrange for another date and time.

      9. What is the dress code of the family members when they come for parent visit?
      The family must wear appropriately when they come for parent visit. SAF Detention Barracks will send a slip indicating the dress code together with the parent-visiting letter.
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    • Singapore Statutes: http://statutes.agc.gov.sg

      1. The NS Enlistment Act.
      2. SAF Act

      Absence without leave
      22. —(1) Every person subject to military law who is absent without leave from service in the Singapore Armed Forces or from the place where he is lawfully required for the time being to be shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction by a subordinate military court to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 2 years or any less punishment authorised by this Act.

       

      (2) It shall be a defence for any person charged under this section to prove that his absence was a result of circumstances over which he had no control.

       

      Desertion
      23. —(1) Every person subject to military law who deserts shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction by a subordinate military court to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 10 years or any less punishment authorised by this Act.

       

      (2) For the purposes of this section, a person deserts if he —

       

      (a) leaves or fails to attend at his place of duty in the Singapore Armed Forces with the intention of remaining permanently absent from duty without lawful authority, or, having left or failed to attend at his place of duty in the Singapore Armed Forces, thereafter forms the like intention; or

       

      (b) absents himself without leave with intent to avoid service or any particular service before the enemy,

       

      and references in this Act to desertion shall be construed accordingly.

       

      Failure to report deserters and absentees
      24. Every person subject to military law who, knowing that any other person has committed an offence under section 22 or 23 —

       

      (a) fails to report the fact without delay; or

       

      (b) fails to take any steps within his power to cause that person to be apprehended,

       

      shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction by a subordinate military court to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 2 years or any less punishment authorised by this Act.

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,715 posts since Dec '03
    •  

       

      Source:
      www.mindef.gov.sg/imindef/mindef_websites/atozlistings/army/About_BMT.html

       



      Types of Basic Military Training


      PES A/B1 BMT
      This 9-week programme trains combat-fit recruits in the basic military skills to prepare them for advanced vocational training. The programme includes weapon training with the SAR 21 rifle which will teach recruits technical handling and marksmanship skills; a Battle Inoculation Course that simulates a real battlefield; a Field Camp which develops basic survival skills; progressive training to complete a 24-km route march which builds combat fitness and endurance; and hand grenade training.
      For those who fail to achieve the NAPFA test silver award, they are required to undergo an 8-week Physical Training Phase (PTP) prior to the PES A/B1 BMT.
       
      PES BP BMT
      As evidence has shown that obese recruits are able to achieve optimum fitness levels and weight loss in about 19 weeks, the new BMT programme for recruits with Body Mass Index (BMI) scores exceeding 27.0 will be 19 weeks. This BMT programme is designed to help obese recruits improve their physical fitness progressively while equipping them with basic soldiering skills and knowledge.


      PES B2 BMT
      Enlistees who were PES C1 previously underwent a 7-week BMT programme. The new 9-week PES B2 BMT programme will be conducted for recruits who are medically fit for deployment in selected combat and combat support vocations, such as signal operators, combat medics and naval system operators. These recruits will be given a new medical classification of PES B2, in place of the existing PES C1 classification. This is to ensure that the medical classification of our soldiers is consistent with their deployment. The new 9-week programme will include customised physical training, as well as basic combat training to prepare them for their combat and combat support roles.
       
      PES C BMT
      The 9-week BMT programme will be conducted for PES C recruits. This programme will include light physical training and vocational training to prepare them for combat service support vocations, such as service medic, and those related to logistics and administration.
       
      PES E BMT
      The 4-week BMT programme will be conducted for PES E recruits. This programme will focus on, vocational training as well as National Education, SAF core values, regimentation and discipline to prepare recruits for combat service support vocations.