21 Dec, 06:45AM in sunny Singapore!

Recent Posts by eac

Subscribe to Recent Posts by eac

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
    • FYI, PES is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PULHHEEMS.


      1) Go to Public Hospital / Private Specialist.

      Note: You will be classified as a subsidised patient if your first visit is via:

      • - Referral letter from a Government Restructured Hospital under subsidised status, A&E, Polyclinic or SAF, without specifying any specialist by name.
      • - Discharge from inpatient class B2 or C without specifying a specialist by name.


      2)
      Consult specialist, and do whatever medical check ups required. E.g. physical exam, blood test, x-ray, CT scan, MRI scan.

       

      3) Specialist gave a finalised clinical diagnosis.

       

      4) Get the specialist to write you a memo which is to be given to SAF MO. Those who can and are willing to spend some more money can get him/her to write you a specialist report, which is more precise and detailed.

      Note: For not to waste time and money, please be more direct yet humble. Request the specialist to write about reviewing of PES and medical board / anything specific such as any excuses to your conditions.

       

      5) Book an medical review appointment using the eHealth module @ www.ns.sg (for NSman Reservists).

      Just go down to your camp medical centre (for NSFs).

      Call CMPB @ 6373 1340 to request another PES review (for Pre-Enlistees after CMPB Checkup).

       

      6) Make a trip down to the respective unit camp medical centre. Give the MO whatever supporting documents you have in hand. E.g. Specialist memo/report (most usually the case and highly recommended), x-ray films, CT/MRI scan report, blood investigation lab report... etc.

       

      7) MO will decide whether you are deemed eligible for KIV downgrade, according to the criterias set in the "PES Bible" directive. E.g. Diagnosis, Extent of Diagnosis, Degree of Diagnosis/Injury/Illness/Disease...etc.

       

      8) If deemed so, you will sign an acknowledgement notice of Medical Board, whereby your case statement is prepared for review discussion at the monthly medical board meet (usually at the Formation/Division HQ) with another NSF CPT MO and the Chairman (SAF Regular Medical Doctor of MAJOR rank or above). Your Medical Board result will be post mailed to you by your respective NSHRC (Formation NS Hub).

       

      Time and time again, the questions for Medical Review (Downgrade) is repetitive. Therefore, this serves as a general SOP for Medical Board.

       

      Extract from www.mindef.gov.sg/nsmen:
      It is crucial that you update your NS HRCs if you develop a new medical condition or if an existing medical condition has worsened, which may affect your ICT performance. This is so that arrangements will be made for you to attend a medical review at the SAF medical centre to assess your fitness condition for NS.

      You MUST bring along all your investigation results and memorandums from your external physician or specialist during your medical review. You may be given a medical certificate for ICT deferment, be scheduled for a medical board to downgrade you if your medical condition is significant, or be referred to a restructured hospital for further examination depending on the outcome of your medical review.

      If your medical condition is deemed suited for ICT participation by the medical officer, you will then be allowed to attend ICT.

      Edited by eac 05 Dec `14, 9:18PM
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
    • A new way to serve

      Story Benita Teo

      The SAF is opening its doors to the broader community who are not National Service (NS)-liable but have a strong desire to contribute to national defence.

      Have you always wanted to trade in your school blouse and skirt for military fatigues and join Dad for his In-Camp Training (ICT)?

      Perhaps you often find yourself listening with envy as your male colleagues share stories about their NS days, and wish you could be one of them.

      Or maybe you recently made Singapore your home, and would like to do your part in keeping it safe for your family and friends.

      You'll now have the chance to fulfil these wishes.

      Come 2015, the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) will welcome more people into its family of Regulars, Operationally Ready National Servicemen (NSmen) and
Full-time National Servicemen (NSFs).

      With the establishment of the SAF Volunteer Corps (SAFVC), non NS-liable Singaporeans and Permanent Residents (PRs) - such as women, first-generation PR sand new citizens - will now be able to contribute to national defence, show support for NS, and deepen their understanding and ownership of national defence.

      During his Committee to Strengthen NS Press Conference on 22 May, Defence Minister Dr Ng Eng Hen noted that through the year-long process of engaging the public and listening to their ideas and feedback, committee members met with "many, who do not have NS obligations, but wanted to contribute to national defence". Thus, the SAFVC, a uniformed volunteer scheme, was set up following the committee's recommendation.


      The SAFVC logo (top) and its predecessor the SVC logo (above).

      New look, old traditions


      The SAFVC was officially set up in end-September, and is helmed by Commander SAFVC, Colonel (COL) Mike Tan.

      Headquarters (HQ) SAFVC is located in Maju Camp, where training will also be held.

      The SAFVC may be new, but it follows in the footsteps of a long and distinguished tradition of volunteerism for national defence.

      Beginning with the Singapore Volunteer Rifle Corps (a private organisation established in 1854 to combat lawlessness), the corps of volunteers evolved over the next 48 years into the Singapore Volunteer Corps (SVC), the SAFVC's predecessor.

      The SVC played an important role forming the Singapore Military Forces in 1953 together with Regulars and part-time national servicemen.

      The volunteer units were then subsumed into the People's Defence Force (PDF) in 1965.

      With the subsequent growth of NS and the SAF, the number of volunteers declined, and the last Volunteer battalion, 101 PDF, held its final parade in 1984.

      As homage to the illustrious 160-year history of Volunteer Military Service in Singapore, the SAFVC logo incorporates elements from the original SVC coat of arms, such as the circular shield, banner and laurel.

      Finding the right fit


      Applications to the SAFVC began on 13 Oct and within a week, more than 200 Singaporeans and PRs had dropped off their forms at the Army Recruitment Centre (ARC) or signed up online. Dr Ng revealed this on his Facebook page, adding that he was "happy with the encouraging response so far".

      COL Tan echoed Dr Ng's comments, remarking that the growing numbers were indeed encouraging. The SAFVC plans to recruit three batches of volunteers in the first year, with 30 to 50 enlistees in the inaugural batch commencing training on 23 Mar 2015.

      After being shortlisted, applicants will have to undergo an interview as well as a medical screening before they are accepted into the SAFVC. COL Tan plans to oversee the interview process, and recognised that it would be an onerous task.

      "Certainly, the SAFVC is not for everybody; (for instance) if you are not the outdoorsy type, you may find that it is not your cup of tea. There are other MINDEF (Ministry of Defence) volunteer schemes (available).

      "That's why the interview is so important - I want to make sure that the volunteers we select really want to be here, and will also fit in with us." He added that motivation and aptitude are crucial factors in determining the applicants' suitability.

      COL Tan also noted that although there is no minimum commitment period for volunteers, those who indicate that they are prepared to commit for the long term will be considered more favourably.




      Welcome to the uniformed life

       

      Upon successful application, volunteers will receive their letters of enlistment and embark on a three-phase training programme, designed to give them a taste of Basic Military Training (BMT) and equip them with the skills necessary for their respective roles.

      The SAFVC Volunteers (or SVs, as the enlistees are known) will undergo a two-week Basic Training (BT), followed by a one-week Qualification Training (QT). Some will be required to attend another week-long Advanced Training (AT) to further prepare them for their vocations.

      The two-week stay-in BT is a module common to all SVs.

      It aims to develop in the SVs a basic appreciation of the SAF and understanding of national defence.

      The SVs will have the opportunity to try their hands at firing a Singapore Assault Rifle 21, throw a live hand grenade, and even go through a field camp.

      Training will be supervised by COL Tan, and led by a Head of Training and a company commander. They will be assisted by a team of experienced trainers from BMT Centre and parts of the Infantry.

      COL Tan emphasised that "the idea is not to train someone from a civilian to a soldier; that will take nine weeks (the length of BMT). However, the two weeks is sufficient for them to have an introduction to NS and learn about the military ethos and what it means to wear a uniform".

      Currently, there are plans to offer the modular option of completing the BT over a series of weekend days instead of the continuous fortnight stay-in. This option would be helpful for volunteers with heavy school, work or family commitments.

      Although the curricula for both the continuous and modular options are similar and will equip the SVs with the necessary knowledge and skills, COL Tan encouraged those who could afford the time to choose the stay-in option for "the most complete experience", as it includes the field camp component.



       

      A unique rank structure was created for the SAFVC Volunteers (SVs). As their contribution are different from those of Regulars and NSmen, there is no comparison between the SV rank and others in the SAF. It also differentiates them from SAF Volunteers, former NSmen who continue to service past the statutory age.

      New enlistees begin as SV (Trainees), and will be promoted to SV1 upon completion of their Qualification Training. Subsequent promotions are dependent on years of service, as well as conduct and performance.


      In-depth training

       

      After BT, SVs then move on to QT, where they will train under the respective domain experts to prepare for their specific roles. One of the trainers they might meet is Military Expert (ME) 5-1 See Yen Ling, a Nursing Officer at the SAF Medical Training Institute. ME5-1 See trains doctors and medics when they return for their annual ICT, and will train SVs who sign up as medical trainers.

      Elaborating on the second phase of training for medical trainers, ME5-1 See said: "As medical professionals in hospitals, the types of cases they see are different from those in the military.

      During QT, they will be introduced to the Medical Corps and become familiar with our work environment, such as the equipment, simulation labs and outfield environments.

      "Upon completion of the QT phase, SVs will be considered full-fledged SAFVC Volunteers and can begin to be deployed to SAF units. However, some roles, such as the Auxiliary Security Trooper (AST), will require the AT.

      While AST trainees will gain proficiency in rifle handling and learn when to make use of their weapons during the QT, an additional week at the AT is necessary for them to acquire the required knowledge and learn the application of their skills - such as apprehending and securing targets.

      Service Benefits

      • Meal & transport claims
      • 50 e-Mart credits per year of completed service
      • SAF Group Term Life Insurance coverage during call-ups
      • Medical and dental treatment at SAF medical and dental centres during call-ups
      • Eligibility for associate membership at SAFRA and NS Resort & Country Club

      Part of the family

       

      SVs can choose from 17 roles in nine categories. They will typically be called up to serve seven days annually, alongside servicemen and women from the Army, Navy and Air Force, donning the SAFVC formation patch on their respective green, grey or blue uniforms. Some roles, such as those in engineering, medicine or law, require prior work experience, while others like the AST, InfoMedia Staff and Bridge Watchkeeper are open to all.

      Working with SVs will be a new experience for Regulars, NSmen and NSFs alike. However, COL Tan believes the experience will be beneficial to all.

      ME5-1 See agreed: "I look forward to working alongside the SVs, because they will be able to share their experience in their respective fields with us. This will, in turn, enrich our training as well."

      During call-ups, the SVs will report directly to the various SAF units which they are attached to. They will receive instructions from their Regular and national servicemen commanders.

      "The section or mission commander is expected to take charge of the mission and guide the SV in becoming an effective member of the team. This is because he has undergone two years of NS and several ICTs and is therefore better trained and more experienced (in fulfilling missions)," COL Tan explained.

      He added: "This is why NS will always be the cornerstone of national defence and will not be replaced by the SAFVC. They are trained much more rigorously."

      Nonetheless, "We hope the NSmen will come to respect and appreciate the SVs because, while they may not be as intensively trained, they come with life and career experience," said COL Tan. "They will also bring another set of eyes and perspectives to situations that have become commonplace to us."

      Interested volunteers may obtain their hardcopy forms from ARC, or download the electronic forms from the SAFVC website (www.mindef.gov.sg/safvc) and email them to [email protected]. Applicants must be 18 to 45 years old, and will be eligible to serve from the ages of 18 to 50.

      Edited by eac 05 Dec `14, 12:58PM
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
    • Source: iprep.ns.sg

      Leave Schemes

      Weekend leave

      You should be able to take weekends off starting from your 3rd week in NS. However, this may vary for different Uniformed Services and it's best to check with your officer.

      Vacation leave

      As an NSF, you are eligible for 14 days of vacation leave per year.

      Medical leave

      You can take medical leave if it is authorised by your unit’s Medical Officer (MO) / Dental Officer (DO), a government doctor or a registered private practitioner. Don’t forget to get your medical certificate (MC), without it you cannot get the medical leave approved.

      Compassionate leave

      Your Commanding Officer (CO) can grant up to 3 days of compassionate leave per year (without having to expend your annual vacation leave) for the following circumstances:

      • Death, imminent death or dangerous illness of your parent, grandparent or next-of-kins
      • Serious domestic problems where your presence is essential

      Unrecorded Leave For Sports

      As an NSF, you may be granted full pay unrecorded leave if you are selected to represent Singapore in a major regional or international sporting event.

      Edited by eac 04 Dec `14, 10:32PM
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
    • Please call the 24/7 NS hotline at 1800-3676767 to speak to a customer service officer.

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
    •  

      Booking non-ICT IPPT/RT/IPT is simple, easy, fast and convenient. Do it:-

      • Online at: www.ns.sg
      • By phone: 1800-eNSNSNS (or 1800 - 3676767)
      • Download the iOS apps "MyIPPT" at Apple Apps Store

      You can also cancel or amend your bookings using the above three easy/ simple ways.

       

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
    •  

      It's for me to know, and you to find out...

      Simply call the 24/7 NS hotline at 1800-3676767 to speak to a customer service officer.

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
    • Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mechanized_infantry

      Mechanized infantry are infantry equipped with armored personnel carriers (APCs) or infantry fighting vehicles (IFVs) for transport and combat (see also mechanized force).

      Mechanized infantry is distinguished from motorized infantry in that its vehicles provide a degree of protection from hostile fire, as opposed to "soft-skinned" wheeled vehicles (trucks or jeeps) for motorized infantry. Most APCs and IFVs are fully tracked, or are all-wheel drive vehicles (6×6 or 8×8), for mobility across rough ground. Some nations distinguish between mechanized and armoured infantry, designating troops carried by APCs as mechanized and those in IFVs as armoured.

      The support weapons for mechanized infantry are also provided with motorized transport, or are built directly into combat vehicles, in order to keep pace with the mechanized infantry in combat. For units equipped with most types of APC or any type of IFV, fire support weapons, such as machine guns, autocannons, small-bore direct-fire howitzers, and even anti-tank guided missiles, are often mounted directly on the infantry's own transport vehicles.

      Compared with "light" truck-mobile infantry, mechanized infantry can maintain rapid tactical movement and (if mounted in IFVs) possess more integral firepower. They require more combat supplies (ammunition and especially fuel) and ordnance supplies (spare vehicle components), and a comparatively larger proportion of their manpower is required to crew and maintain the vehicles. For example, most APCs mount a section of seven or eight infantrymen, but have a crew of two. Most IFVs only carry six or seven infantry, but require a crew of three. To be effective in the field, mechanized units also require large numbers of mechanics with specialized maintenance and recovery vehicles and equipment. Light infantry are more effective when fighting from prepared defence positions, but are more vulnerable than mechanized infantry on the attack.

      Edited by eac 19 Nov `14, 10:23PM
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
    • Please call the 24/7 NS hotline at 1800-3676767 to speak to a customer service officer.

       

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
    • September 2014

      ENHANCED NATIONAL SERVICE (NS) INDIVIDUAL PHYSICAL PROFICIENCY TEST (IPPT) MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR HOME TEAM NATIONAL SERVICEMEN

      1.    The new NS IPPT Management system for Home Team NSmen will take effect from 1 Sep 2014. Enhancements to the NS IPPT policies seek to ease administrative constraints to better support NSmen in managing their fitness and other commitments. The key changes are as follows:

      a.    Extension of IPPT/IPT/RT windows to 12 months; and
      b.    Increase in monetary incentives for good IPPT performance.


      Enhancements with effect from 1 Sep 2014

      2.    The IPPT window will be extended from 9 months to 12 months. In this window, i.e. from 1 Apr to 31 Mar of the following year, NSmen must attempt and pass their IPPT. Alternatively, they can volunteer for a 10-session IPPT Preparatory Training (IPT) programme. They will exit the IPT programme if they (1) complete 10 sessions of IPT; or (2) meet their Personal Performance Targets.

      3.    The RT window will also be extended from 3 months to 12 months. NSmen will have one full financial year, i.e. from 1 Apr to 31 Mar of the following year, to complete their 20-session RT programme. They will exit the RT programme if they (1) complete 20 sessions of RT; or (2) pass IPPT during the stipulated RT-IPPT sessions. Diagram 1 below illustrates the current and new NS IPPT management system.

      Diagram 1: Changes to NS IPPT Management System





      4.    The quantum for the IPPT monetary incentives has been enhanced. Table 1 below shows the revised quantum, which will take effect from 1 Apr 2015.

      Table 1: New IPPT Monetary Incentives Quantum



      5.    NSmen who do not perform IPPT and/or RT will continue to be disciplinarily dealt with. NSmen who have accumulated 3 or more default counts will be liable to attend a 5-day residential In-Camp-Training (Physical Training) [ICT(PT)].  

      Transition to New NS IPPT System

      6.    As at 1 Sep 2014, NSmen who have not passed their IPPT or completed IPT will enjoy an automatic extension of their IPPT/IPT window to 31 Mar 2015. See Diagram 2 below. NSmen who have passed their IPPT or completed IPT for FY2014 will have their new IPPT/IPT window opened from 1 Apr 2015 to 31 Mar 2016.

      Diagram 2: Extension of IPPT/IPT Window for Transition Year 2014

       

       
      7.    NSmen who are scheduled for RT sessions from 1 Sep 2014 onwards will enjoy an extended RT window (i.e. remaining RT window + next 12-month window) of up to 31 Mar 2016 to complete their RT programme. See Diagram 3 below.

      Diagram 3: Extension of RT Window for Transition Year 2014



      8.    One-time Reset of Default Offences.  NSmen with existing offences and charges are allowed a one-time opportunity to reset all offences by completing their IPPT/IPT/RT requirements during this transition, i.e. by 31 Mar 2015 for IPPT/IPT, and 31 Mar 2016 for RT.

      Source: www.ns.sg

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03

    • 100 years after Norway introduced full voting rights for women, the Norwegian Parliament voted to adopt compulsory conscription for women as well as men with an overwhelming majority. – This is an historic day for equality and for our armed forces, said Norway’s Defence Minister, Mrs. Anne-Grete Stroem-Erichsen, on the day of the vote.

      With the decision, seen as another major step towards equal rights, Norway will be the only European country and first peacetime NATO member practising gender-neutral conscription.

      This is important for two reasons. Male-only conscription is out of synch with the rest of society. All citizens shall have the same rights and obligations, regardless of sex.

      Secondly, in order to secure our operational capabilities in the future we need to recruit the best, and we need diversity. Therefore we cannot limit our recruitment to the male half of the population, says the Defence Minister.
       
      This does not mean that all women must serve in the military. Women will, however, be subject to conscription on an equal basis with men, making them as likely to serve in the military as people of the opposite gender.  Norway’s armed forces have an annual requirement for 8 - 10,000 conscripts out of a total of 60,000 men and women in the relevant age group. Recruitment is already high and increasing, and the number of applicants each year exceeds the needs of the Armed Forces.
       
      We do not adopt conscription for women because we need more soldiers, but because we need the best, no matter who they may be, says the Defence Minister, and adds: - High-tech equipment alone does not make for a modern military; we also need a modern and diverse organisation with different people, skills and perspectives.
       
      Norway’s goal is to have 20 percent women in its armed forces by 2020. Today the share is nine percent. Over the years, a wide range of measures have been taken to increase the number of women, but they have yielded limited results. Today, women who join the military are asked why they do it. It is my hope that the natural question to ask in the future is why they don’t want to serve, says Mrs. Stroem-Erichsen.

      Norway on Tuesday voted to extend military service to women, saying the step was meant to expand the talent pool for its armed forces.

      “We wish to extend military service to all in order to attract the most motivated and competent (recruits),” Minister of Defence Ine Eriksen Soereide told news channel TV2 after parliament adopted amendments to two laws paving the way for the change.

      Most European countries have abolished conscription in favor of a professional army, but Norway has instead said it wants to ensure its military is more competent and diverse by making it “gender neutral.”

      The new policy will come into effect in 2016, bringing the NATO country, which operates a weak form of mandatory military service, more in line with Israel than other European nations.

      But the change, first proposed by the previous center-left government, is unlikely to affect more than a small fraction of young Norwegians.

      Some 8,000 people — including about 1,000 women, all volunteers — are currently called up for military service each year out of a potential 60,000.

      Norway had an official target of reaching 20 percent women in the army by 2020 under the previous administration but the right-wing government, which took power last year, has not committed to gender targets.

      An historic bill was passed by the Norwegian parliament on Tuesday extending mandatory military service to women as part of a plan to promote gender equality.

      Proposition 122 L is looking to amend the Military Service and Home Guard Acts to enable women to fight in the military.

      The bill was passed in Oslo with a strong majority of 96 votes in favour of the proposition while just six votes were against.

      Women currently make up about 13 per cent of the Norwegian Armed Forces but that ratio could be set to rise. The proposition will be put to a second reading later in the term before being written into law. According to the Norwegian government women women currently make up about 13 per cent of the Norwegian Armed Forces. If the bill is enacted, all medically fit women between 19 and 44 years old will have to serve at least 19 months of mandatory duty in the armed forces. It will apply to women born in Norway from 1997 onwards, with the first service in the summer of 2016. Women will also be subject to conscription during wartime.

      Defense Minister Ine Eriksen Soereide said in a statement, 'The most suitable and most motivated will join the service, regardless of gender.'

      Norway is one of the most proactive countries in the world for championing women in the work force. Norway's Prime Minister Erna Solberg and Finance Minister Siv Jensen are both women.

      The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development previously acknowledged that the Scandinavian country has the fourth highest proportion of female workers in the world (with 76.1 per cent) after Iceland, Sweden and Switzerland.

      Currently, women constitute just above 10 percent of military conscripts in Norway, serving in the armed forces on a volunteer basis. The initiative of compulsory military service for all citizens regardless of gender makes Norway the first European country to make such a decision in peacetime.

      Earlier this year, the Norwegian army started testing unisex dormitories. Women soldiers shared bedrooms with male recruits at one of the country's military bases.

      "Even though there is a girl in the room, it doesn't mean there are any romances. We are just soldiers," conscript Mathias Hoegevold told Ruptly news agency.

      In August 2013, the country's military officials announced that men in the army would be permitted to grow their hair long and keep it in ponytails, after a male officer complained it wasn't fair that only women were allowed to have longer styles.

      If enacted, the new bill for mandatory female service will include provisions for the use of gender-neutral language.

      Before being written into law, the proposition must be approved in the second reading. Voting is expected to take place later this term.

      Edited by eac 16 Nov `14, 8:39PM
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
    • 康康 - 兵变

      OS:
      这个歌是我这张专辑唯一收录的一首新歌 希望失恋的朋友
      要谅解你的另外一半 因为有时候其实你自己也不是很好
      只是你不愿意承认

      月台目送我离开 好心疼 不能陪在妳身旁 怕妳会孤单
      是否妳也想着我 好遥远 几个星期不见妳 妳就爱上别人

      说要等我回来 为何如今要分开
      妳的兵变我好难挨 难道妳已忘了我

      看着流星坠落 好难过
      劝我自己要振作 日子还是要过

      OS:
      那天晚上收到妳的分手信 我躲在棉被里偷哭
      但是我并不怪妳 因为我知道 让我变成男人的不是当兵
      而是妳离开我了

      Edited by eac 13 Nov `14, 11:19PM
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
    • Municipal Services Office


      The Municipal Services Office (MSO) aims to improve the Government’s overall coordination and delivery of municipal services. These services include the upkeep and improvement of the common living environment such as the cleanliness and maintenance of the estates and the upgrading or provision of facilities and infrastructure. Working hand-in-hand with key government agencies, the MSO oversees the review and formulation of policies, systems and processes to ensure efficient and effective delivery of municipal services.

      Municipal Services Office
  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
    • www.orc.gov.sg

      Online Reporting Centre (ORC) is an integrated electronic service for Citizens to lodge reports relating to:

      Environment
      Housing maintenance
      Immigration offender/Illegal employment/Foreign worker housing issues



      ORC gives one-stop convenience for Citizens to lodge reports without having to know, which agency to submit to.

      NOTE:
      Should not use this service if the case is life threatening, or requires agency's immediate action, as the reports may not be read immediately. Contact Us if any immediate action is required.

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
    • Expertise Conversion Scheme (for NSmen/ Reservists)


      With the need to conduct a full spectrum of operations, the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) is seeking to expand our operational capabilities especially in niche areas of expertise. The Expertise Conversion Scheme (ECS) was thus conceived as a scheme that allows the SAF to tap on Singapore's talent pool. It provides more opportunities for our Operationally Ready National Servicemen (NSmen) with deep civilian professional expertise to voluntarily continue contributing to the nation's defence by enhancing operational capabilities in areas identified by the SAF. Examples of such niche areas of expertise include law, medicine, engineering, psychology and info-communications.

      The ECS is based on the Military Domain Experts Scheme (MDES), which is premised on civilian professional expertise in key military domains and comprises a rank structure organised according to qualifications and experience. In recognition of the expanded scope of responsibility in their new roles, NSmen converted under the ECS will be emplaced to the rank of Military Expert 4 (ME4) upon full completion of training.

      Key Features

      Eligibility. Under this scheme, NS WOSEs (Warrant Officers, Specialists and Enlistees) holding specialised professional qualifications identified by the SAF as operationally relevant will be recommended to join the ECS. Interested applicants can also register their interest with the NS Relations Officers in their Formation or Division Headquarters. This scheme is primarily for NSmen who have completed their Operationally Ready National Service (ORNS) commitments. NSmen with existing ORNS commitments may also be considered for conversion to meet SAF's operational requirements. Such applications will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

      Rigorous Selection and Comprehensive Training for ECS Personnel.  Besides stringent qualification and background checks to ensure that they possess the appropriate expertise for the roles, shortlisted NS WOSEs will need to possess sound leadership qualities and good character attributes. After passing the selection board interview, they will undergo training comprising three components: (1) Specialisation Training; (2) Leadership Training; and (3) On-Job-Training (OJT). This is to level up the skills set of ECS personnel with that of their military and MDES counterparts. Upon completion of the training, ECS personnel will be emplaced to hold the ME4 rank.

      Minimum Obligation.   As ECS personnel will be holding senior MDES ranks, they will have their NS statutory age raised to 50 years, similar to their NS officer counterparts. They will be required to serve in their new rank and roles for a minimum period of three years. As per the SAF Act, they are liable for call up for up to 40 days per year.

      Implementation Timeline.  The inaugural batch of ECS personnel will complete their required training and attain their new ranks of ME4(A) in July this year. They will then undergo OJT in the next few NS years before attaining their ME4 ranks. Henceforth, depending on operational requirements and availability of suitable candidates, there will be up to two batches of ECS conversions a year.

      Edited by eac 09 Nov `14, 2:33PM
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
    • Source: www.ns.sg

       

      Vocational Assessment

      Introduction

      The Vocational Assessment Centre (VAC) conducts a battery of tests called the Manpower Aptitude Assessment System (MAPAS) to assess your mental abilities. This is so that we can maximize our limited manpower by putting people where their abilities can be best used.

      Your Vocational Assessment scores will affect important decisions, which include assignment to a vocation and selection to be a commander (Officer, Specialist).

      Therefore, you should put in as much effort as possible to do the tests well and accurately, as this will not only help the nation maximize it's limited manpower, but also help us place you into vocations that will make good use of your abilities.

      What are the tests like

      We use different sub-tests to measure different types of mental ability. Some of the mental abilities that we measure include memory, speed of responding, abstract reasoning, following complex instructions, solving mathematical problems, mental spatial ability, and psycho-motor skills. Please click on the following links to try out some of these tests.

      a) Word analogies
      b) Number reasoning
      c) Picture reasoning

      All the sub-tests are computer administered. Most of the sub-tests will present a problem or question on the screen and you will need to respond accordingly. Some sub-tests however, measure speed or hand-eye co-ordination and may look like simple computer games.

      How long is the test at VAC

      Since we have to be as accurate as possible, we need to measure as wide a range of your abilities as is possible. Thus, the testing will require about 2 to 2 1/2 hours of your time.

      What to do

      • Do not worry too much. All we require you to do is to do your best. Each sub-test has instructions to guide you on what to do.
      • Ask for help: If you have problems understanding any of the sub-tests or the instructions during testing, there will be people on-site to help you.
      • Get a good night's sleep. Come for the test with a fresh mind.

       

      Edited by eac 09 Nov `14, 2:31PM
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,642 posts since Dec '03
    •  

       

      Source:
      www.mindef.gov.sg/imindef/mindef_websites/atozlistings/army/About_BMT.html

       



      Types of Basic Military Training


      PES A/B1 BMT
      This 9-week programme trains combat-fit recruits in the basic military skills to prepare them for advanced vocational training. The programme includes weapon training with the SAR 21 rifle which will teach recruits technical handling and marksmanship skills; a Battle Inoculation Course that simulates a real battlefield; a Field Camp which develops basic survival skills; progressive training to complete a 24-km route march which builds combat fitness and endurance; and hand grenade training.
      For those who fail to achieve the NAPFA test silver award, they are required to undergo an 8-week Physical Training Phase (PTP) prior to the PES A/B1 BMT.
       
      PES BP BMT
      As evidence has shown that obese recruits are able to achieve optimum fitness levels and weight loss in about 19 weeks, the new BMT programme for recruits with Body Mass Index (BMI) scores exceeding 27.0 will be 19 weeks. This BMT programme is designed to help obese recruits improve their physical fitness progressively while equipping them with basic soldiering skills and knowledge.


      PES B2 BMT
      Enlistees who were PES C1 previously underwent a 7-week BMT programme. The new 9-week PES B2 BMT programme will be conducted for recruits who are medically fit for deployment in selected combat and combat support vocations, such as signal operators, combat medics and naval system operators. These recruits will be given a new medical classification of PES B2, in place of the existing PES C1 classification. This is to ensure that the medical classification of our soldiers is consistent with their deployment. The new 9-week programme will include customised physical training, as well as basic combat training to prepare them for their combat and combat support roles.
       
      PES C BMT
      The 9-week BMT programme will be conducted for PES C recruits. This programme will include light physical training and vocational training to prepare them for combat service support vocations, such as service medic, and those related to logistics and administration.
       
      PES E BMT
      The 4-week BMT programme will be conducted for PES E recruits. This programme will focus on, vocational training as well as National Education, SAF core values, regimentation and discipline to prepare recruits for combat service support vocations.