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    • 1. Just ask hospital specialist to issue MC to cover ICT period. Probably excuse RMJ (Run, March, Jump) and lower limbs activities during ICT.  

      2. Then also request for a specialist memo, then please submit the hospital specialist memo to the camp doctor to assess and process for PES medical review. 

      3. Most likely only Att B with temporary excuses for a few weeks, still fit for light duties. 

      4. Most likely it's still among the NS units within the same camp. If not, it's ever better to just internal transfer within the same NS unit (ORD until phased into MR (MINDEF Reserve)). Isn't less administrative paperwork for NS unit, the better it will be for S1 Manpower branch? 

      As usual, please refer to this guideline:
      http://sgforums.com/forums/1390/topics/392446

      Edited by eac 10 Sep `14, 9:01PM
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    • Posting Order time varies. 

      All depends on Unit S1 Manpower branch to liaise with CPC. 

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    •  

      It's better to request by speaking to your OC/ CO as soon as possible.

      Never try, never know.

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    • No need. There's no reason because it doesn't seem to affect any military combat and physical fitness activities. 

      Whenever mealtimes in camp/ cookhouse/ canteen/ outfield, you just continue to avoid whatever food you can't usually eat/ chew is sufficient.

      In cookhouse, when queuing in line for food to be served, you can just tell the cookhouse food servers which food items don't scoop onto your plate is good enough. 

      Edited by eac 04 Sep `14, 9:26PM
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    • Servicemen from the Singapore Armed Forces can look forward to choosing between Adidas and Zoot running shoes from this year's end, said Defence Minister Ng Eng Hen on Sunday.



      In a Facebook post, Dr Ng uploaded pictures of his three pairs of Asics running shoes - which NSmen use now - and said: "Like most of you, I was delighted with the Asics shoes... They were high quality and have given me many hours of happy walking and jogging. More good news for NSmen. The next set of running shoes will be from Adidas and Zoot and will be available at the end of the year 2014."

      This is the Singapore Armed Forces's fourth change since 1995. It had switched to Asics in 2011 as the Japanese brand was considered to be lighter, more durable and shock-absorbent than the New Balance or Brooks models in use since 2007.

      German brand Adidas and American sports brand Zoot. More details on the new shoes will be provided at a later date by MINDEF/ SAF soon.

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    •  
      Many guys and gals who's been growing up overseas are probably not too familiar with the concept of National Service, aside from listening to the exciting adventures as told by their fathers. So to help your children or you (if you are going to enlist soon) ease into NS, do take a look at the resources we're putting together below. 
       

      NS Familiarisation Visit

      Together with MINDEF, OSU organises NS Familiarisation visits to the Basic Military Training Centre (BMTC) on Pulau Tekong, where many recruits take their first step of this important journey in their lives. This visit is open to Singaporean citizens, both boys and girls, between the ages 15 to 18 years old. 
       
      The first NS Familiarisation visit was organised on 18 July 2012, and 15 OS youths took this opportunity to take a sneak peak at life at BMTC and even got to experience it for a little bit. Take a photo tour of their short but educational tour here

      NS Through the Lens of Overseas Singaporeans

      To many OS (and more so their parents), their journeys before and during NS are fraught with worries and concerns. Am I mentally prepared to survive in the jungle? How am I going to be fit enough to endure the hardship? What are the various paths available? We invite OS to share their NS experiences with our readers here on the OS Portal. 
       
      Our first article on the topic features 2LT Sherman Pay, ROS Commander with the 128 Squadron, who relates the ups and downs that he's gone through during NS. It was certainly no easy road for someone who's lived in China for the last 11 years. Read how he's done it here
       
      If you would like to share your experience with us, drop us an email.





      11 Jul 2012 I POSTED BY OSP
       

       2LT Sherman Pay, ROS Commander with 128 Squadron, RSAF

      It was to be a decision many Singaporean boys who have grown up overseas, would have to make – whether to return home to Singapore and serve National Service (NS). Not necessarily an easy decision for any 19-year-old Singaporean; not when you’ve lived the last 11 years of your life overseas. 

      Home Away from Home

      For Sherman Pay, home had been in the Chinese city of Xiamen in Fujian province where he lived with his family. They would return twice a year to visit their relatives, often during Chinese New Year and the summer holidays. Save for his relatives, Sherman had hardly any friends in Singapore. Not surprising, given that he had spent most of his growing up years away from Singapore.

      Sherman is ‘focused and ready’!

      His parents had made known their preference for the family to remain as Singaporeans. He recalled his mother signing him up for tours that took him around Singapore’s landmarks during his visits back as a child.

      While serving NS, Sherman lives with his uncle. However, being away from his immediate family does take its toll: “Sometimes I really miss them. I have learned to appreciate them more, especially  when I am feeling lonely. There would be times when I feel really down. But for me, my mom had brought me up to be independent and that really helped”.

      What-Ifs’ and ‘How-Woulds’

      Prior to Sherman’s decision to return home to serve NS, his parents had concerns. Their uneasiness rubbed off on Sherman as well: “My mom was worried that I might get bad influence as there were people from all walks of life serving NS. She was also afraid that I couldn’t blend in and it would be hard for me to make friends. I was worried that I would be quite alone as I didn’t have friends (in Singapore) to begin with. I didn’t know how physical it (NS training) would get as I didn’t have my physical education here, so I didn’t know how (physically) fit I was compared to Singaporeans here. I didn’t know if I could keep up with the physical standards. My mum was worried about cultural differences because I don’t interact with Singaporeans that often. She was also worried I may not adapt to it.”


      All geared up behind the ROS

      As for his father, he was worried as to whether Sherman was both physically and mentally strong enough to endure the training and demands of a soldier and if he might be bullied by his platoon sergeants. “I think it was because he believed Army trainings mean harsh treatments by the sergeants, but in reality, the trainings are carried out professionally with safety as a priority,” Sherman says with a grin. It helped that Sherman had Singaporean friends he’d grown up with in Xiamen who’d returned ahead of him to serve NS and they were able to cope well in NS.

      Flying High In Many Ways

      Sherman has been doing well in NS since his enlistment two years ago. The well-respected officer with the Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) is addressed by his men and superiors in the 128 Squadron as ‘2LT Sherman Pay’. He makes no qualms about aspiring to be an officer prior to his enlistment. “I have a few cousins who went to OCS (Officer Cadet School), so they told me, ‘If you can, try to be an officer as the experience would be more enriching.’ Therefore that was my goal during BMT; I was very motivated.” Despite the initial anxieties, Sherman felt that serving NS has been a good and positive experience for him and it has made him mature from a boy to a man.


      It wasn’t just a positive attitude and hearing about success stories that got Sherman geared up for life in military fatigues. He credits his superiors who were very supportive and maintained an open communication channel with him during his Basic Military Training (BMT): “My supervisors did a good job. My OC (Officer Commanding) in BMT (Basic Military Training), he tried to engage us overseas Singaporeans, on enlistment day and told us that if we had any problems, if we couldn’t blend in, to look for him and he would help us. When we’re down, he’ll always motivate us. Although your family is not around, but during the time in NS, you have your so-called ‘brothers’, your bunkmates (and) they’ll also motivate you.” Yes, training will get tough, but the recruits will have to support each other to spur on and pull through together.

      Setting up the ROS

      These days, Sherman literally has a bird’s eye view on things through the videos by Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), which would be fed back to the Receive-Only Station (ROS) that he operates with his team. The video feed, when relayed to the ground commanders, provides better battlefield situational awareness and enhances mission effectiveness.

      Appraisal to be Well-Adapted

      Sherman’s immediate supervisor Major (MAJ) Sam Ong, the OC in charge of ROS for 128 Squadron, says that Sherman has adapted very well in the Squadron. He believes Sherman’s positive experience in BMT and how those who had returned from overseas to serve NS were actively engaged by their superiors, set the foundation for a smoother transition for the recruits. “Those things are very important because the initial phase is when these overseas Singaporeans will need to adjust to the change in environment and that’s when engagement must come to the forefront. When Sherman came to the unit, I didn’t feel that he had any problems adjusting to the operational requirements of 128 Squadron. That foundation served him well and enabled him to adapt to the operational tempo without any difficulties” says MAJ Ong.

      Sherman with Major Ong

      MAJ Ong regards Sherman as “a very outstanding NSF who’s not just able to lead when he’s required to, but he’s also a very capable team player. Sherman’s positive attitude and his willingness to take on challenges and overcome them will serve him well in the future”.

      Does MAJ Ong feel that Singaporean youths who return from overseas to serve NS are disadvantaged in some way? He doesn’t believe so as information is readily available in this age of connectivity and ease of access to the internet, where “you’re able to sift out information pertaining to NS. It’s this sense of wanting to find out what’s ahead that makes the difference. Perhaps years ago when information was limited, that would have made it more difficult for overseas Singaporeans to find out more about NS”.

      Seeing Significance in NS

      The most memorable event for Sherman was when he was commissioned as an officer. “My parents came back to attend my commissioning parade and they were very proud of me. After being commissioned as an officer, you will take up a leadership role. So, you’ll need to exercise a lot of your leadership skills. When you have to inspire people to be more capable beyond their normal abilities, make them go an extra mile, that’s when it feels very rewarding,” he says, beaming with a sense of accomplishment.

       
      Posing beside a UAV

      How this contrasts to his initial scepticism of how serving NS would help in the defence of a small nation like Singapore. That faded after Sherman underwent the National Education programmes conducted by his supervisors. It then dawned on him the crucial role each serviceman, himself included, played in national security and the defence of Singapore. MAJ Ong believes that the key to creating a positive NSF experience is to make sure the NSFs understand and internalise their role in national defence”.

      But it is easy to think that two years serving NS is two years too long. In Sherman’s perspective, “If you think of your career, your studies, it’s a postponement of two years. So before I enlisted, I was also thinking, ‘You waste two years of your life. People already get their degrees and you’re still studying. People are already working’. But after I enlisted, I realised I learnt a lot during NS. I learnt about leadership, having a positive mindset, how to overcome hardship – these kinds of things. The experience was enriching in many ways, and in the end I felt I’ve become more mature and better equipped as a person. My two years in NS wasn’t wasted”.


      Sherman and his team together with Maj Ong

       

       

       

       

       

      23 Oct 2013 I POSTED BY OSP
       

      When we hear of National Service (NS), it is often assumed that it relates to the time spent with the army or the SAF, but that’s not always the case. “Growing up, my father always talked about the SAF and his time there, so I always thought that I would be joining the SAF. So when I received my enlistment letter and found out that I was to join the SCDF, I was definitely surprised!” Such was SGT (Sergeant) Raphael Tan’s initial response when the enlistment letter indicated that he was to join the Singapore Civil Defence Force for two years of NS. In this second issue of ‘NS through the Lens of an Overseas Singaporean’, we met up with Raphael Tan, a Singaporean who lived abroad and came back home to serve NS in the SCDF.

      Since his birth, Raphael has had to adapt to both Western and Asian cultures due to his parents’ commitments in missionary work and overseas businesses. “I was born in Cardiff, Wales and spent a couple of years growing up in the UK and in Sweden before coming back to Singapore for pre-school. Following that, we left for Bangkok, Thailand in which I spent 13 years there.”

      When it was time to return for his NS stint and not knowing what to expect, a nervous Raphael went on to find out as much as he could about the Singapore Civil Defence Force. “Despite being a little worried, when I found out that they train fire-fighters, I was actually quite excited about it,” revealed the young sergeant. For those unfamiliar with the SCDF, this uniformed organisation belongs to the Ministry of Home Affairs and plays a critical role in Singapore by providing fire-fighting, rescue and emergency ambulance services. They also oversee the implementation of fire safety and civil defence shelter matters.


       SGT Raphael Tan (left) demonstrating a training drill with two of his trainees

      When enlistment day arrived, a sense of uncertainty could be felt among the new recruits, “I was quite nervous but I wasn’t the only one because on the first day, you see many other nervous boys as well.” He was quick to reassure though, saying, “The instructors were quite kind and understanding as they were once in our shoes as well, so it wasn’t too bad actually.”

      What helped Raphael was that his overseas experience allowed him the opportunity to meet different people from diverse backgrounds. This made interacting with others in the SCDF much easier for him, especially when certain situations force you out of your comfort zone. “We had a training stint at Outward Bound in Sabah,” recalls Raphael, “and did hiking treks into dense jungles. A lot of us were placed out of our comfort zones and because of that, you could really see what people were really like. It was a real eye-opening experience where we learnt a lot about ourselves and of each other.”

      Following his basic training phase, Raphael is now a Fire and Rescue Specialist trainer. “I’m in the fire-fighting branch, so I instruct trainees on how to fight different kinds of fire.” Fires like flashovers and backdrafts are just some of the many thermal accidents that fire-fighters encounter and have to deal with. One of the ways to do that efficiently is to ensure that they are well-versed in their drills, in which our trainer/resident expert and his team will give you a sneak preview of in our video.

      Having almost completed his two-year NS stint, Raphael now looks forward to becoming a Physical Therapist in the field of Sports Sciences and will take the skills that he has learnt from the SCDF with him wherever he goes. He reflects, “There are many things that I’ve gained from the SCDF and a lot of what I’ve learnt can be used in most emergency situations in our daily lives. I’ll bring along all these knowledge with me and touch wood, if I need to draw upon them one day, at least I’ll be mentally well-equipped.”

      While there are some who might still feel that NS is a hindrance, both to their career and study plans, to Raphael, NS is an opportunity to continue learning new life skills in an environment that is unlike any other. “You’re going to go through a lot of new experiences so take it all in and you’ll learn a lot of new things. Embrace it because a lot of what you will experience here, you won’t get a chance to do so outside of NS. Once you leave, you might just miss the time you’ve spent here.”

      By Wan.

      Video by Evon Kua and Ian Tan.

      The first part of 'NS through the Lens of an Overseas Singaporean' can be found here and it features 2LT Sherman Pay, a ROS Commander with the Republic of Singapore Air Force.

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    • Under the Enlistment Act, NS-liable persons are enlisted at the earliest opportunity upon turning 18 years old. For those who are studying, MINDEF does allow some flexibility for them to complete their full-time studies up to the GCE 'A' Levels or Polytechnic Diploma (or their equivalent), both locally and overseas, before enlisting for NS. Those who have already embarked on their full-time studies but who do not meet the deferment conditions, will have to disrupt their studies and be enlisted for NS at the earliest opportunity scheduled by the Central Manpower Base (CMPB), including those who take up Singapore Permanent Residency in the midst of their studies.

      Overseas Studies
         
      NS-liable persons who graduated before September 2011 may be granted deferment to pursue full-time overseas studies (up to the GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or their equivalent qualifications) if they are able to commence the course before 18 years old, as at 1st January of the course commencement year. NS-liable persons graduating from September 2011 onwards may be granted deferment to pursue full-time overseas studies (up to the GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or their equivalent qualifications) if they are able to commence their courses before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 & ITE students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year. The higher cut-off age will apply to courses commencing from 1st January 2012 onwards.

      NS-liable persons will be required to apply for an exit permit for overseas trips of 3 months and longer and will be required to furnish a bond of $75,000 or an amount equivalent to 50% of the combined annual gross income of both parents for the preceding year, whichever is higher.

      Application for Deferment
         
      NS-liable persons may apply for deferment online at the NS portal (http://www.ns.sg) during NS registration and pre-enlistment documentation.

      Those applying for deferment to pursue local studies may be required to furnish documentary proof for verification upon CMPB's request. Upon CMPB's request, they will be required to submit to CMPB a letter from their school certifying their enrolment, their course of study, as well as their course commencement and completion dates.

      Those applying for deferment to pursue overseas studies must submit to CMPB a letter from their school certifying their enrolment, their course of study as well as their course commencement and completion dates. In addition, they must submit their parents' Income Tax Notices of Assessment (both local and overseas) for the preceding year.

      Those who subsequently wish to pursue or switch to a new course or institution must seek prior approval from CMPB.

      Notes: The information provided in this website are general guidelines. For further details, you may wish to contact the NS Call Centre at [email protected] or Tel:1800-3676767 (eNSNSNS).

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    • FAQs on Revisions of Exit Control Measures for Pre-Enlistees

      Q1. Why must MINDEF impose exit controls on NS-liable males?

      Exit controls are necessary to ensure that NS-liable males who have gone overseas to study or reside at a young age return to fulfil their NS responsibilities.

      Q2. Why can't MINDEF exempt young males aged 13 to 16½ from exit controls?

      Exit control measures have to be applied at a reasonably younger age so that they could be effective to prevent those who leave at a younger age defaulting on their NS responsibilities

      Q3. Why has MINDEF decided to shift the starting age for exit controls from age 11 to 13?

      Currently, the starting age of exit controls is pegged at age 11, the age where Singaporeans used to be issued with NRICs. With Singaporeans now being issued NRICs at age 15, there is no longer a special reason to retain age 11 as the starting age for exit controls. MINDEF has therefore decided to set it at age 13, which is when students would have just started their secondary school education.

      Q4. Why is MINDEF removing passport controls?

      With the introduction of the non-extendable Singapore Biometric passport, a continuation of passport controls for young males would mean that they will have to pay for a new biometric passport upon expiry each time. This will result in greater inconvenience and higher cost for young males and their families. MINDEF has therefore decided to remove passport controls.

      Q5. Will young males holding non-biometric Singapore passport be given full validity?

      Those holding non-biometric Singapore Passports will also have their passports extended for the full duration of 5 or 10 years. This is however subject to the remaining lifespan of the passport.

      Q6. Why does MINDEF require young males to apply for an exit permit?

      With the removal of passport controls, it is necessary for MINDEF to extend exit permit requirements (which currently affect only NS-liable males aged 16½ and above) to males aged 13 and above in order to ensure that young males who go overseas return to serve NS. However, to avoid inconveniencing those who make short overseas trips during vacations, exit permits will only be required for overseas trips of 3 months or more.

      Q7. Will young males who require exit permits be required to furnish a bond?

      Young males aged 13 to 16½ will only be required to furnish a bond if they require an exit permit of 2 years or more. This arrangement is similar to the current practice where only young males who require a passport validity of more than 2 years are required to furnish a bond.

      Males aged 16½ to enlistment are approaching the age of enlistment. They are therefore subject to more stringent exit controls to deter potential NS defaulters. The current practice of requiring such males to furnish a bond if they require an exit permit of 3 months or more will continue.

      Q8. Will young males aged 13 to 16½ who fail to apply for an exit permit be sentenced to imprisonment?

      The penalty regime for exit permit offences of young males aged 13 to 16½ will be a fine of up to $2,000, with no custodial sentences. They will however be subject to harsher penalties should they continue to be in breach of the Enlistment Act after that age 16½.

      Males above 16½ years who travel and remain overseas without applying for an exit permit will be prosecuted under the Enlistment Act. They will be liable upon conviction to a fine of up to $10,000 or imprisonment for a term not exceeding 3 years or both.

      Q9. How will MINDEF deal with young males who do not understand their obligations under the Enlistment Act or those who have parents/guardians who deliberately encourage them to be in breach of the Enlistment Act?

      MINDEF recognises that some young males may not be sufficiently mature to understand their obligations under the Enlistment Act. Their parents or guardians may also have been instrumental in decisions, which are in contravention of the Enlistment Act. Parents and guardians would therefore also be liable for the exit permit offences of their children or wards of ages 13 to 16½, so that the penalty can be imposed on their parents or guardians when the circumstances warrant it. MINDEF will consider the circumstances of the case carefully before deciding whether to issue warnings, composition fines or to charge the parent or guardian in court.

      Q10. When will the revised exit controls take effect?

      The revised exit control measures will be introduced together with the launch of the Singapore Biometric Passport in the later half of the year.

      Q11. With the removal of passport controls, what would be the arrangement for young males who have furnished bonds for extended passport validity under the Immigration Bonding Scheme?

      As males below the age of 13 will no longer come under the ambit of passport or exit control, those who had furnished a bond to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority under the Immigration Bonding Scheme will have their bonds released.

      Males aged 13 to 16½ currently bonded in order to be issued with passports of extended validity will be required to apply for an exit permit for overseas trips of 3 months or more. Those who require an exit permit of 2 years or more will continue to be bonded. Those who require an exit permit of less than 2 years or who do not require an exit permit will have their bonds released.

      Q12. If MINDEF continues with passport controls, how many pre-enlistees would be inconvenienced by having to apply for a new biometric passport every year?

      According to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority, there are approximately 120,000 pre-registrants (males aged 11 to 16½) and 100,000 registrants (males aged 16½ to enlistment) passport holders. With the passport validity of pre-registrants and registrants capped at 2 years and 1 year respectively, we would expect a pre-registrant to have to apply for a new passport once in 2 years and a registrant once a year. On average, 100,000 have their passports extended annually.

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    • NS-liable Persons with Dual Citizenship
       
      If your son has dual citizenship, it is still mandatory for him to register for NS when he reaches 16 1/2 years of age.  On turning 18 years of age, he has to serve 2 years of NS. 
       

      Singapore does not recognise dual citizenship. If your son decides to retain his Singapore Citizenship upon reaching 21 years of age, he is required to renounce his foreign citizenship.

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    • If you are between 13 and 16.5 years old:
      You need to apply for an exit permit if you intend to travel or remain overseas for 3 months or longer. If you are remaining overseas for 2 years or longer, your parents/guardians will also need to furnish a bond, in the form of a Banker's Guarantee of S$75,000 or 50% of the combined annual gross income of both parents for the preceding year, whichever is higher.

      If you are above 16.5 and have not enlisted for NS:

      You need to apply for an exit permit if you intend to travel or remain overseas for 3 months or longer. Your parents/guardians will need to furnish a bond, in the form of a Banker's Guarantee of S$75,000 or 50% of the combined annual gross income of both parents for the preceding year, whichever is higher. 

      Those who require exit permit of 2 years or longer will be required to furnish a bond. This bonding requirement is similar to the current arrangement where security in the form of Banker's Guarantee must be furnished. The amount of the security bond is S$75,000 or 50% of the combined gross annual income of both parents for the preceding year, whichever is higher. The monetary bond requirement for male citizens who accompany their parents on overseas employment may be waived and they be bonded by deed with two sureties.

       

      Why must MINDEF impose exit controls on NS-liable males?

      Exit controls are necessary to ensure that NS-liable males who have gone overseas to study or reside at a young age return to fulfil their NS responsibilities.

      Will young males aged 13 to 16.5 who fail to apply for an exit permit be sentenced to imprisonment?

      The penalty for exit permit offences of young males aged 13 to 16.5 will be a fine of up to $2,000, with no custodial sentences. They will however be subjected to harsher penalties should they continue to breach of the Enlistment Act after age 16.5.

      Males above 16.5 years who travel and remain overseas without applying for an exit permit would have committed an offence under the Enlistment Act. They will be liable upon conviction to a fine of up to $10,000 or imprisonment for a term not exceeding 3 years or both.

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    • National-service-liable males who migrated from Singapore before age 11 and have not enjoyed significant socio-economic benefits of citizenship (e.g., applied for a Singapore identity card or studied in Singapore beyond the age of 11) are allowed to renounce their Singapore citizenship, but not before they turn 21.

      Until then, they are required to register for national service with Central Manpower Base and apply for a deferment.

      After turning 21, they are then eligible to renounce their Singapore citizenship.

      Generally, those who left Singapore after the age of 11 will be deemed to have enjoyed the socio-economic benefits of Singapore. They will not be allowed to renounce their Singapore citizenship without fulfilling NS obligations.

  • Moderator
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    • Inspiring stories of the sons of Singapore returning to Singapore to dutifully serve NS:

      http://sgforums.com/topics/search?q=Singaporean+Son&commit=Go&type=topics

      Edited by eac 18 Aug `14, 10:15PM
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  • Moderator
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    • National-service-liable males who migrated from Singapore before age 11 and have not enjoyed significant socio-economic benefits of citizenship (e.g., applied for a Singapore identity card or studied in Singapore beyond the age of 11) are allowed to renounce their Singapore citizenship, but not before they turn 21.

      Until then, they are required to register for national service with Central Manpower Base and apply for a deferment.

      After turning 21, they are then eligible to renounce their Singapore citizenship.

      Generally, those who left Singapore after the age of 11 will be deemed to have enjoyed the socio-economic benefits of Singapore. They will not be allowed to renounce their Singapore citizenship without fulfilling NS obligations.

      Edited by eac 18 Aug `14, 10:18PM