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    • Pre-National Service (NS) students in pre-university institutions, polytechnics and the Institute of Technical Education (ITE) will have to contend with push-ups, instead of pull-ups, for their National Physical Fitness Award (NAPFA) test from January 2015.

      The Ministry of Education said on Thursday (Nov 6, 2014) that this change will facilitate the use of the NAPFA test results for pre-enlistment purpose, in line with the modifications in the Individual Physical Proficiency Test (IPPT) announced earlier by the Ministry of Defence.

      Currently, the NAPFA test consists of six items: Sit-up; pull-up for males and inclined pull-up for females; sit-and-reach; standing broad jump; shuttle run; and 2.4km run/walk. There will be no change to the test items for all students at the primary and secondary levels, and for female students in pre-university institutions, polytechnics and ITE, MOE stated.

      "Inclined pull-up and pull-up will continue to be used for this group to train upper body
      muscular strength and endurance," the ministry added.

      NEW PE SYLLABUS

      MOE also said its new physical education (PE) syllabus is being introduced in stages from primary to pre-university level from 2014.

      "The new syllabus aims to equip students with the ability to engage in a wide range of physical activities and sports. This will lay a strong foundation for a lifelong pursuit of a physically active and healthy lifestyle," it stated.

      Physical fitness will continue to be emphasised through the new Holistic Assessment in PE, which will be introduced to all schools in 2016 to support the new PE syllabus. It will help students develop a holistic perspective of fitness and the enjoyment of exercise and sports. Students will track their fitness level, participation in sports, games and other physical activities, the Ministry said.

      In addition, students will design their own programmes to achieve their desired fitness levels for different purposes, according to MOE.

      - CNA

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    • Please call the 24/7 NS hotline at 1800-3676767 to speak to a customer service officer.

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    • FYI, PES is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PULHHEEMS.


      1) Go to Public Hospital / Private Specialist.

      Note: You will be classified as a subsidised patient if your first visit is via:

      • Referral letter from a Government Restructured Hospital under subsidised status, A&E, Polyclinic or SAF, without specifying a specialist by name.
      • Discharge from inpatient class B2 or C without specifying a specialist by name.


      2)
      Consult specialist, and do whatever medical check ups required. E.g. physical exam, blood test, x-ray, CT scan, MRI scan.

       

      3) Specialist gave a finalised clinical diagnosis.

       

      4) Get the specialist to write you a memo which is to be given to SAF MO. Those who can and are willing to spend some more money can get him/her to write you a specialist report, which is more precise and detailed.

      Note: For not to waste time and money, please be more direct yet humble. Request the specialist to write about reviewing of PES and medical board / anything specific such as any excuses to your conditions.

       

      5) Book an medical review appointment using the eHealth module @ www.ns.sg (for NSman Reservists).

      Just go down to your camp medical centre (for NSFs).

      Call CMPB @ 6373 1340 to request another PES review (for Pre-Enlistees after CMPB Checkup).

       

      6) Make a trip down to the respective unit camp medical centre. Give the MO whatever supporting documents you have in hand. E.g. Specialist memo/report (most usually the case and highly recommended), x-ray films, CT/MRI scan report, blood investigation lab report... etc.

       

      7) MO will decide whether you are deemed eligible for KIV downgrade, according to the criterias set in the "PES Bible" directive. E.g. Diagnosis, Extent of Diagnosis, Degree of Diagnosis/Injury/Illness/Disease...etc.

       

      8) If deemed so, you will sign an acknowledgement notice of Medical Board, whereby your case statement is prepared for review discussion at the monthly medical board meet (usually at the Formation/Division HQ) with another NSF CPT MO and the Chairman (SAF Regular Medical Doctor of MAJOR rank or above). Your Medical Board result will be post mailed to you by your respective NSHRC (Formation NS Hub).

       

      Time and time again, the questions for Medical Review (Downgrade) is repetitive. Therefore, this serves as a general SOP for Medical Board.

       

      Extract from www.mindef.gov.sg/nsmen:
      NSmen must update their NS HRCs if they should develop any new medical condition or if their existing medical condition has worsened which might affect their ability to perform their duties during ICT. Arrangements will then be made for them to attend a medical review at the SAF medical centre to assess their fitness for NS.

      The NSmen MUST bring along all investigation results and memorandums from his external physician/specialist during the medical review. Depending on the outcome of the medical review, the NSman may be given a medical certificate to defer him from ICT, be scheduled for a medical board to downgrade him if his medical condition is significant, or referred to a restructured hospital for further investigation. In the event that the medical officer determines that the NSman’s medical condition will not affect his ability to participate in the ICT, he will allow the NSman to attend the ICT.

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    • Refer: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Guards

      The formation was initially formed on 1 January 1975 as the 7th Singapore Infantry Brigade (SIB), with a total personnel strength of four officers and five Other Ranks.[1][2] The Brigade took command of the Infantry Training Depot (ITD) on 1 January 1976 and the 7th and 8th Battalions of the Singapore Infantry Regiment (SIR) on 9 February 1976. On 1 July 1976, the 7 SIB was officially declared operational.[1] In view of its operational role, the ITD was removed from the Brigade and the Singapore Armed Forces Guards Unit (SAFGU) was added to the 2 remaining battalions.[1][2]

      On 1 July 1977, the SAFGU was renamed as the 1st Battalion, Singapore Guards. A year later on 1 April 1978, the 8 SIR became the 2nd Battalion, Singapore Guards.[3] The 7 SIB was officially accorded Elite Status on 1 April 1978. With the award of elite status, the 7 SIR was transferred to the 3rd Singapore Infantry Brigade in 1978, leaving the 7 SIB with the following sub-units:

      This make-up lasted until 1980, when it was decided to make the 7 SIB into an all guards formation. The Commando units were transferred out, and the 7 SIR returned to the 7 SIB. It was renamed as 3rd Battalion, Singapore Guards.[3]

      On 17 Dec 1991, the 7th Brigade Training School (7 BTS) came under the command of the 7 SIB. However, from Sept 1996, all Basic Military Training (BMT) were taken over by Basic Military Training Centre (BMTC), and the 7 BTS was closed down. 11 Oct 1994 marked the formalisation of Guards as the Guards Formation.[2]

      On 6 Apr 1979, a special parade was held to present the beret with a new Cap Badge Backing to the 7 SIB. The then Chief of General Staff (CGS), MG (NS) Winston Choo, explained that the backing was designed for the use of the Guardsmen as a symbol of elitism.[2] The three battalions received their first Colours 11 Jun 1983. All Guardsmen wear a "Guards" Tab on their left shoulder sleeve. The "Guards" Tab was presented to the Guardsmen on 23 Jun 1989 as a form of recognition of their elite status. On 9 June 1994, the Khaki Beret was presented to the Guards Formation. While the infantry green beret was worn with the Cap Badge Backing previously, all Guardsmen have since donned their distinctive Guards Khaki Beret with a deep sense of pride.[2]

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    •  

       

      Source:
      www.mindef.gov.sg/imindef/mindef_websites/atozlistings/army/About_BMT.html

       



      Types of Basic Military Training


      PES A/B1 BMT
      This 9-week programme trains combat-fit recruits in the basic military skills to prepare them for advanced vocational training. The programme includes weapon training with the SAR 21 rifle which will teach recruits technical handling and marksmanship skills; a Battle Inoculation Course that simulates a real battlefield; a Field Camp which develops basic survival skills; progressive training to complete a 24-km route march which builds combat fitness and endurance; and hand grenade training.
      For those who fail to achieve the NAPFA test silver award, they are required to undergo an 8-week Physical Training Phase (PTP) prior to the PES A/B1 BMT.
       
      PES BP BMT
      As evidence has shown that obese recruits are able to achieve optimum fitness levels and weight loss in about 19 weeks, the new BMT programme for recruits with Body Mass Index (BMI) scores exceeding 27.0 will be 19 weeks. This BMT programme is designed to help obese recruits improve their physical fitness progressively while equipping them with basic soldiering skills and knowledge.


      PES B2 BMT
      Enlistees who were PES C1 previously underwent a 7-week BMT programme. The new 9-week PES B2 BMT programme will be conducted for recruits who are medically fit for deployment in selected combat and combat support vocations, such as signal operators, combat medics and naval system operators. These recruits will be given a new medical classification of PES B2, in place of the existing PES C1 classification. This is to ensure that the medical classification of our soldiers is consistent with their deployment. The new 9-week programme will include customised physical training, as well as basic combat training to prepare them for their combat and combat support roles.
       
      PES C BMT
      The 9-week BMT programme will be conducted for PES C recruits. This programme will include light physical training and vocational training to prepare them for combat service support vocations, such as service medic, and those related to logistics and administration.
       
      PES E BMT
      The 4-week BMT programme will be conducted for PES E recruits. This programme will focus on, vocational training as well as National Education, SAF core values, regimentation and discipline to prepare recruits for combat service support vocations.

  • Executive
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    3,780 posts since Dec '03
    • Medical screening is a series of medical tests done at the Medical Classification Centre (MCC) at CMPB (location map).

      The objective of these tests is to ascertain your medical condition and accord you a suitable Physical Employment Status (PES). Based on your PES, you will be assigned to a suitable vocation.

      Here are the various PES gradings:

      • PES A: Fit for all combat vocations
      • PES B1: Fit for most combat vocations
      • PES B2: Fit for some combat vocations
      • PES BP: Fit for obese BMT training
      • PES C: Fit for combat support vocations
      • PES D: Temporary unfit for grading and pending further review
      • PES E: Fit for administrative duties only
      • PES F: Medically unfit for any form of service

      Note that if you are given a PES D grading, it means that more time/tests are required to confirm your medical condition. This normally takes about 2-3 months. However, this duration may be longer depending on your medical condition.

      More information on Medical Classification Centre (NS Portal).

      Commitment to Care

      Want to find out more about the SAF medical system? Follow a recruit from his pre-enlistment medical examination to his encounters with the medical service during his BMT.

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    • Medical screening is a series of medical tests done at the Medical Classification Centre (MCC) at CMPB (location map).

      The objective of these tests is to ascertain your medical condition and accord you a suitable Physical Employment Status (PES). Based on your PES, you will be assigned to a suitable vocation.

      Here are the various PES gradings:

      • PES A: Fit for all combat vocations
      • PES B1: Fit for most combat vocations
      • PES B2: Fit for some combat vocations
      • PES BP: Fit for obese BMT training
      • PES C: Fit for combat support vocations
      • PES D: Temporary unfit for grading and pending further review
      • PES E: Fit for administrative duties only
      • PES F: Medically unfit for any form of service

      Note that if you are given a PES D grading, it means that more time/tests are required to confirm your medical condition. This normally takes about 2-3 months. However, this duration may be longer depending on your medical condition.

      More information on Medical Classification Centre (NS Portal).

      Commitment to Care

      Want to find out more about the SAF medical system? Follow a recruit from his pre-enlistment medical examination to his encounters with the medical service during his BMT.

  • Executive
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    3,780 posts since Dec '03
    • Refer: http://sgforums.com/forums/1390/topics/395004

       

      Physical Employment Status (PES)

      Arrow PES A (L1) = Fit for all combat vocations. (Full BMT)

      Arrow PES B (L1) = Fit for most combat vocations. (Full BMT)

      All PES A and B1 will be followed by the L-Code (Land Deployability Code) as follows:

      L1 – Fit for all field duties including frontline duty.
      Can be deployed in Manoeuvre vocations and be involved in direct combat.

      Arrow PES Bp = Fit for obese Full BMT (applicable to obese recruits).

      ============================================================

      Arrow PES B2 (formerly called C1) - Fit for some combat vocations. Required to take IPPT but can be excused up to 2 static stations in IPPT.

      PES B2 grading will be followed by the L-Code (Land Depolyability Code) as follows:

      L1 – Fit for all field duties including frontline duty.  Can be deployed in Manoeuvre vocations and be involved in direct combat.

      L2 – Fit for most field duties.  Can be deployed in Manoeuvre vocations of Brigade HQ level units and above, and/or Combat Support vocations in frontline units of Battalion and above, and/or Combat Service Support vocations at all echelons.

      L3 – Able to bear firearms and operate in a field environment.  Can be deployed in Combat Support vocations of Brigade HQ and above, and/or Combat Service Support Vocations at all echelons.

      ============================================================

      Arrow PES C = Fit for combat service support vocations. (Modified BMT)

      Further subdivided into:

      PES C2 - Do not have to take IPPT for NSF/ NSman, except regulars who are required to take Alternative Aerobic Fitness Test (AAFT).

      PES C9 - All servicemen not required to take IPPT.

      PES C grading will be followed by L-Code (Land Deployability Code) as follows:

      L2 – Fit for most field duties.  Can be deployed in Manoeuvre vocations of Brigade HQ level units and above, and/or Combat Support vocations in frontline units of Battalion and above, and/or Combat Service Support vocations at all echelons.

      L3 – Able to bear firearms and operate in a field environment.  Can be deployed in Combat Support vocations of Brigade HQ and above, and/or Combat Service Support vocations at all echelons.

      L9 – Able to bear firearms and protect themselves, others and property. Can be deployed in Combat Support vocations in Main Support Area, and/or Combat Service Support vocations of Brigade HQ and above.

      ============================================================

      Arrow PES D = Temporary unfit for grading and pending further review.

      ============================================================


      Arrow PES E = Fit for administrative duties only.

      PES E1 - Able to participate in simple observance parades and LIFE activites.

      PES E9 - Unfit for any forms of physical activities; field duties/exercises.

      PES E grading will be followed by the L-Code (Land Deployment Code) as follows:
      L9 – Able to bear firearms and protect themselves, others and property.  Can be deployed in Combat Support vocations in Main Support Area, and/or Combat Service Support vocations of Brigade HQ and above.

      Arrow PES F = Medically unfit for any form of service.

  • Moderator
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    • FYI, PES is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PULHHEEMS.


      1) Go to Public Hospital / Private Specialist.

      Note: You will be classified as a subsidised patient if your first visit is via:

      • Referral letter from a Government Restructured Hospital under subsidised status, A&E, Polyclinic or SAF, without specifying a specialist by name.
      • Discharge from inpatient class B2 or C without specifying a specialist by name.


      2)
      Consult specialist, and do whatever medical check ups required. E.g. physical exam, blood test, x-ray, CT scan, MRI scan.

       

      3) Specialist gave a finalised clinical diagnosis.

       

      4) Get the specialist to write you a memo which is to be given to SAF MO. Those who can and are willing to spend some more money can get him/her to write you a specialist report, which is more precise and detailed.

      Note: For not to waste time and money, please be more direct yet humble. Request the specialist to write about reviewing of PES and medical board / anything specific such as any excuses to your conditions.

       

      5) Book an medical review appointment using the eHealth module @ www.ns.sg (for NSman Reservists).

      Just go down to your camp medical centre (for NSFs).

      Call CMPB @ 6373 1340 to request another PES review (for Pre-Enlistees after CMPB Checkup).

       

      6) Make a trip down to the respective unit camp medical centre. Give the MO whatever supporting documents you have in hand. E.g. Specialist memo/report (most usually the case and highly recommended), x-ray films, CT/MRI scan report, blood investigation lab report... etc.

       

      7) MO will decide whether you are deemed eligible for KIV downgrade, according to the criterias set in the "PES Bible" directive. E.g. Diagnosis, Extent of Diagnosis, Degree of Diagnosis/Injury/Illness/Disease...etc.

       

      8) If deemed so, you will sign an acknowledgement notice of Medical Board, whereby your case statement is prepared for review discussion at the monthly medical board meet (usually at the Formation/Division HQ) with another NSF CPT MO and the Chairman (SAF Regular Medical Doctor of MAJOR rank or above). Your Medical Board result will be post mailed to you by your respective NSHRC (Formation NS Hub).

       

      Time and time again, the questions for Medical Review (Downgrade) is repetitive. Therefore, this serves as a general SOP for Medical Board.

       

      Extract from www.mindef.gov.sg/nsmen:
      NSmen must update their NS HRCs if they should develop any new medical condition or if their existing medical condition has worsened which might affect their ability to perform their duties during ICT. Arrangements will then be made for them to attend a medical review at the SAF medical centre to assess their fitness for NS.

      The NSmen MUST bring along all investigation results and memorandums from his external physician/specialist during the medical review. Depending on the outcome of the medical review, the NSman may be given a medical certificate to defer him from ICT, be scheduled for a medical board to downgrade him if his medical condition is significant, or referred to a restructured hospital for further investigation. In the event that the medical officer determines that the NSman’s medical condition will not affect his ability to participate in the ICT, he will allow the NSman to attend the ICT.

      Edited by eac 23 Apr `15, 10:19PM
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    • Prepare for PTP/BMT: http://iprep.ns.sg/

      Secrets to Pass IPPT: http://lifestyle.www.ns.sg/features/fitnessxchange

      Source: www.ns.sg , www.army.gov.sg , www.mindef.gov.sg

       

      Source: http://iprep.ns.sg/

      Are you physically fit? If you have been found to be fit for full Basic Military Training (BMT) i.e. PES A or B1, you may want to take the NAPFA test.

      Should you attain a NAPFA Gold or Silver award at least 2 weeks prior to your Physical Training Phase (PTP) enlistment date, you will attend a 9-week Basic Military Training (BMT) and enjoy a 2-month reduction in your full-time National Service. Those who fail to attain the required fitness level will have to undergo a 8-week Physical Training Phase (PTP) before attending the 9-week BMT.

      The NAPFA test is conducted at the Toa Payoh Stadium (map to Toa Payoh Stadium) every Wednesday (except public holidays). You are required to book an appointment for the test via the NAPFA test booking system prior to the test date and you are only allowed to make one valid booking at any one time.

      Please note that the NAPFA result is valid for 1 year from the date of test. You are advised to report for the test in acceptable attire and punctually. All the six test items must be completed in one single sessions. A maximum of 2 to 5 minutes rest period is permitted between any two tests (for the first test items); a 15 to 30 minutes rest period is permitted before the sixth test item.

      NAPFA tests at Toa Payoh Stadium are conducted strictly on appointment only. Therefore, advance booking via NS Portal must be made latest by Tuesday before 12 noon in order to take the NAPFA test at Toa Payoh Stadium the following day.

      Do note that pre-enlistees who do not book their NAPFA date via the system would not be allowed to take their test at the Toa Payoh Stadium.

      If you wish to know more about the NAPFA test, you may want to read through the FAQ before you make your booking.

       

       

      1. Can I take the test after I failed the NAPFA test the last time?

      Yes. You are allowed to retake it until you pass. There is no limit to the number of times you can take the test.


      2. When is the last date I should take the NAPFA test?

      You should attempt the test as soon as you are ready and you are advised to take it at least 2 weeks before the date of enlistment.


      3. Can I retake only the test items I have failed in my last attempt?

      No. All 6 items must be completed in one single session.


      4. Can I amend my booking after I have booked?

      Yes, you are allowed to amend your booking before 12 pm on the day before the test date.


      5. Can I make a few booking together?

      No, you are only allowed to make 1 booking at any one time. You can make your next booking after the test date you have booked. 

       

       

      FitnessXchange has all the information you need to excel in your daily exercise regimes and IPPT/NAPFA. Get tips from the training guides to boost any aspect that you may be weak in and keep your BMI in check. You can also look up the timetables of FCC and SAFRA gyms if you plan to start an exercise routine. Step up on that healthy lifestyle with FitnessXchange!

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    • Please use the information to get in touch and find out how to reach us.

          Army Recruitment Centre

          3 Depot Road #01-66
          Singapore 109680

          HOTLINE

          1800 - OUR ARMY (687 2769)

          MRT / buses

          Queenstown MRT Station
          Redhill MRT Station
          57, 145, 175, 195, 272, 273, 408

          Edited by eac 14 Apr `15, 8:05PM
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        • NATIONAL SERVICEMAN'S DEATH

          Dead soldier's family sues Singapore Armed Forces, two officers

          Suit accuses SAF of failing to provide safe and conducive training environment

           
          By K C Vijayan Senior Law Correspondent
           

          The family of a national serviceman who died in 2012 after an allergic reaction to smoke grenades is suing the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) for allegedly failing to provide a safe training environment.

          Private Dominique Sarron Lee's platoon commander and the exercise's chief safety officer are also being sued for negligence.

          The suit has been filed in the High Court, where claims exceed $250,000. The damages being sought include $34,300 for Pte Lee's tombstone.

          The 21-year-old suffered breathing difficulties and passed out during the exercise in Lim Chu Kang in April 2012, which involved the use of six smoke grenades.

          The former track athlete from the Singapore Sports School was evacuated to Sungei Gedong Medical Centre before being warded at National University Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at about 2pm the same day.

          A coroner's inquiry in August 2013 found that he had died from an acute allergic reaction to zinc chloride, a key compound used in smoke grenades.

          The coroner also agreed with the findings of an independent Committee of Inquiry in 2012 which said that the number of smoke grenades used in the exercise exceeded the limit of two specified in safety regulations.

          State Coroner Imran Abdul Hamid also pointed out that Pte Lee had "underplayed and underdeclared" his asthma history during a pre-enlistment medical check-up, in which he failed to mention his latest attack.

          The plaintiff in the suit, filed by lawyer Irving Choh, has been listed as the estate of Pte Lee.

          His parents are divorced.

          According to the court papers, Captain Najib Hanuk Muhamad Jalal, then the platoon commander in the 3rd Battalion Singapore Infantry Regiment to which Pte Lee was attached, and chief safety officer Captain Chia Thye Siong allegedly contributed to the death of Pte Lee.

          It is claimed that the officers were duty-bound to ensure that only the maximum number of smoke grenades allowed under safety regulations were detonated.

          It is also alleged that Capt Najib failed to bear in mind Pte Lee's asthmatic condition, which made him more predisposed to suffering an adverse reaction from the smoke.

          Pte Lee, who was diagnosed with asthma prior to enlisting in November 2011, had to wear a blue band around his wrist to indicate his condition.

          Capt Najib's lawyer R.S. Bajwa has filed a notice of appearance in court to address the case.

          Lawyer Laurence Goh Eng Yau is defending Capt Chia.

          The Attorney-General is named as a party in the suit, to defend the SAF.

          According to the suit, the SAF had a duty to provide a safe and conducive environment for Pte Lee to train in.

          This includes providing adequate protective gear for national servicemen during exercises that involve the detonation of smoke grenades.

          Among other things, it is claimed that the SAF failed to provide a sufficient system of checks to ensure compliance with regulations, such as the number of grenades which can be used.

          In the wake of the incident, SAF tightened its safety checks, including having more safety officers on the ground, and set up an Army Safety Review Board to examine the army's overall safety structure, processes and culture.

          An Attorney-General's Chambers spokesman told The Sunday Times that it has "filed an appearance in the action and is presently assessing the matter". A pre-trial conference is due next month.

          [email protected]

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