22 Sep, 03:59PM in sunny Singapore!

Recent Posts by eac

Subscribe to Recent Posts by eac

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • ...NS, do take a look at the resources we're putting together below.    NS Familiarisation Visit Together with MINDEF, OSU organises NS Familiarisation visits to the Basic Military Training Centre (BMTC) on Pulau Tekong, where many ...

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • ... Enlistment Act, NS-liable persons are enlisted at the earliest opportunity upon turning 18 years old. For those who are studying, MINDEF does allow some flexibility for them to complete their full-time studies up to the GCE 'A' Levels or Polytechnic ...

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • FAQs on Revisions of Exit Control Measures for Pre-Enlistees

      Q1. Why must MINDEF impose exit controls on NS-liable males?

      Exit controls are necessary to ensure that NS-liable males who have gone overseas to study or reside at a young age return to fulfil their NS responsibilities.

      Q2. Why can't MINDEF exempt young males aged 13 to 16½ from exit controls?

      Exit control measures have to be applied at a reasonably younger age so that they could be effective to prevent those who leave at a younger age defaulting on their NS responsibilities

      Q3. Why has MINDEF decided to shift the starting age for exit controls from age 11 to 13?

      Currently, the starting age of exit controls is pegged at age 11, the age where Singaporeans used to be issued with NRICs. With Singaporeans now being issued NRICs at age 15, there is no longer a special reason to retain age 11 as the starting age for exit controls. MINDEF has therefore decided to set it at age 13, which is when students would have just started their secondary school education.

      Q4. Why is MINDEF removing passport controls?

      With the introduction of the non-extendable Singapore Biometric passport, a continuation of passport controls for young males would mean that they will have to pay for a new biometric passport upon expiry each time. This will result in greater inconvenience and higher cost for young males and their families. MINDEF has therefore decided to remove passport controls.

      Q5. Will young males holding non-biometric Singapore passport be given full validity?

      Those holding non-biometric Singapore Passports will also have their passports extended for the full duration of 5 or 10 years. This is however subject to the remaining lifespan of the passport.

      Q6. Why does MINDEF require young males to apply for an exit permit?

      With the removal of passport controls, it is necessary for MINDEF to extend exit permit requirements (which currently affect only NS-liable males aged 16½ and above) to males aged 13 and above in order to ensure that young males who go overseas return to serve NS. However, to avoid inconveniencing those who make short overseas trips during vacations, exit permits will only be required for overseas trips of 3 months or more.

      Q7. Will young males who require exit permits be required to furnish a bond?

      Young males aged 13 to 16½ will only be required to furnish a bond if they require an exit permit of 2 years or more. This arrangement is similar to the current practice where only young males who require a passport validity of more than 2 years are required to furnish a bond.

      Males aged 16½ to enlistment are approaching the age of enlistment. They are therefore subject to more stringent exit controls to deter potential NS defaulters. The current practice of requiring such males to furnish a bond if they require an exit permit of 3 months or more will continue.

      Q8. Will young males aged 13 to 16½ who fail to apply for an exit permit be sentenced to imprisonment?

      The penalty regime for exit permit offences of young males aged 13 to 16½ will be a fine of up to $2,000, with no custodial sentences. They will however be subject to harsher penalties should they continue to be in breach of the Enlistment Act after that age 16½.

      Males above 16½ years who travel and remain overseas without applying for an exit permit will be prosecuted under the Enlistment Act. They will be liable upon conviction to a fine of up to $10,000 or imprisonment for a term not exceeding 3 years or both.

      Q9. How will MINDEF deal with young males who do not understand their obligations under the Enlistment Act or those who have parents/guardians who deliberately encourage them to be in breach of the Enlistment Act?

      MINDEF recognises that some young males may not be sufficiently mature to understand their obligations under the Enlistment Act. Their parents or guardians may also have been instrumental in decisions, which are in contravention of the Enlistment Act. Parents and guardians would therefore also be liable for the exit permit offences of their children or wards of ages 13 to 16½, so that the penalty can be imposed on their parents or guardians when the circumstances warrant it. MINDEF will consider the circumstances of the case carefully before deciding whether to issue warnings, composition fines or to charge the parent or guardian in court.

      Q10. When will the revised exit controls take effect?

      The revised exit control measures will be introduced together with the launch of the Singapore Biometric Passport in the later half of the year.

      Q11. With the removal of passport controls, what would be the arrangement for young males who have furnished bonds for extended passport validity under the Immigration Bonding Scheme?

      As males below the age of 13 will no longer come under the ambit of passport or exit control, those who had furnished a bond to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority under the Immigration Bonding Scheme will have their bonds released.

      Males aged 13 to 16½ currently bonded in order to be issued with passports of extended validity will be required to apply for an exit permit for overseas trips of 3 months or more. Those who require an exit permit of 2 years or more will continue to be bonded. Those who require an exit permit of less than 2 years or who do not require an exit permit will have their bonds released.

      Q12. If MINDEF continues with passport controls, how many pre-enlistees would be inconvenienced by having to apply for a new biometric passport every year?

      According to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority, there are approximately 120,000 pre-registrants (males aged 11 to 16½) and 100,000 registrants (males aged 16½ to enlistment) passport holders. With the passport validity of pre-registrants and registrants capped at 2 years and 1 year respectively, we would expect a pre-registrant to have to apply for a new passport once in 2 years and a registrant once a year. On average, 100,000 have their passports extended annually.

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • NS-liable Persons with Dual Citizenship
       
      If your son has dual citizenship, it is still mandatory for him to register for NS when he reaches 16 1/2 years of age.  On turning 18 years of age, he has to serve 2 years of NS. 
       

      Singapore does not recognise dual citizenship. If your son decides to retain his Singapore Citizenship upon reaching 21 years of age, he is required to renounce his foreign citizenship.

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • ... parents on overseas employment may be waived and they be bonded by deed with two sureties.   Why must MINDEF impose exit controls on NS-liable males? Exit controls are necessary to ensure that NS-liable males who have gone overseas ...

  • Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • National-service-liable males who migrated from Singapore before age 11 and have not enjoyed significant socio-economic benefits of citizenship (e.g., applied for a Singapore identity card or studied in Singapore beyond the age of 11) are allowed to renounce their Singapore citizenship, but not before they turn 21.

      Until then, they are required to register for national service with Central Manpower Base and apply for a deferment.

      After turning 21, they are then eligible to renounce their Singapore citizenship.

      Generally, those who left Singapore after the age of 11 will be deemed to have enjoyed the socio-economic benefits of Singapore. They will not be allowed to renounce their Singapore citizenship without fulfilling NS obligations.

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • Inspiring stories of the sons of Singapore returning to Singapore to dutifully serve NS:

      http://sgforums.com/topics/search?q=Singaporean+Son&commit=Go&type=topics

      Edited by eac 18 Aug `14, 10:15PM
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • National-service-liable males who migrated from Singapore before age 11 and have not enjoyed significant socio-economic benefits of citizenship (e.g., applied for a Singapore identity card or studied in Singapore beyond the age of 11) are allowed to renounce their Singapore citizenship, but not before they turn 21.

      Until then, they are required to register for national service with Central Manpower Base and apply for a deferment.

      After turning 21, they are then eligible to renounce their Singapore citizenship.

      Generally, those who left Singapore after the age of 11 will be deemed to have enjoyed the socio-economic benefits of Singapore. They will not be allowed to renounce their Singapore citizenship without fulfilling NS obligations.

      Edited by eac 18 Aug `14, 10:18PM
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • References:

      http://sgforums.com/topics/search?q=NS+Default&commit=Go&type=topics

      http://sgforums.com/topics/search?q=NS+Desert&commit=Go&type=topics

      http://sgforums.com/topics/search?q=NS+AWOL&commit=Go&type=topics

      http://sgforums.com/topics/search?q=NS+Dual&commit=Go&type=topics

      http://sgforums.com/topics/search?q=%2475%2C000&commit=Go&type=topics

      Edited by eac 18 Aug `14, 10:16PM
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • ... court martial. Alternatively, an aggrieved serviceman may request that his conviction or punishment imposed at the summary trial be reviewed by MINDEF's Director Manpower (a delegated authority of the Armed Forces Council). In the case of a GCM, a ...

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • Singapore Statutes: http://statutes.agc.gov.sg

      1. The NS Enlistment Act.
      2. SAF Act

      Absence without leave
      22. —(1) Every person subject to military law who is absent without leave from service in the Singapore Armed Forces or from the place where he is lawfully required for the time being to be shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction by a subordinate military court to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 2 years or any less punishment authorised by this Act.

       

      (2) It shall be a defence for any person charged under this section to prove that his absence was a result of circumstances over which he had no control.

       

      Desertion
      23. —(1) Every person subject to military law who deserts shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction by a subordinate military court to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 10 years or any less punishment authorised by this Act.

       

      (2) For the purposes of this section, a person deserts if he —

       

      (a) leaves or fails to attend at his place of duty in the Singapore Armed Forces with the intention of remaining permanently absent from duty without lawful authority, or, having left or failed to attend at his place of duty in the Singapore Armed Forces, thereafter forms the like intention; or

       

      (b) absents himself without leave with intent to avoid service or any particular service before the enemy,

       

      and references in this Act to desertion shall be construed accordingly.

       

      Failure to report deserters and absentees
      24. Every person subject to military law who, knowing that any other person has committed an offence under section 22 or 23 —

       

      (a) fails to report the fact without delay; or

       

      (b) fails to take any steps within his power to cause that person to be apprehended,

       

      shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction by a subordinate military court to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 2 years or any less punishment authorised by this Act.

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • ... exceeds two years but the defaulter is young enough to serve his full-time and operationally ready NS duties in full, MINDEF will press for a short jail sentence.   2. Where the defaulter has reached an age when he cannot serve his...

      Edited by eac 13 Aug `14, 9:40AM
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • NSmen who have failed their IPPT can now choose to participate in sports such as football, or activities such as a weight-loss regime, under a modified remedial training scheme.

      Channel NewsAsia understands that the new scheme has started in phases, and it will be fully implemented on September 1.

      Currently, NSmen who fail their IPPT have to go for remedial training lasting up to 20 sessions. The training usually focuses on helping them improve on stations that they failed in, such as chin-ups or the 2.4km run.

      The new remedial training scheme will give them five training options to choose from. These include a sports and games programme where they get to play football or touch rugby, and a training regime that helps them lose weight.

      NSmen can also opt for a programme that improves muscular endurance, in which they train using medicine balls and kettlebells, or one that addresses cardiovascular fitness. They can also choose to undergo training that is specific to IPPT.

      This improved scheme comes on the back of changes made to the IPPT preparatory training, or the IPT scheme, that went through a trial phase a month back. Both the revised remedial training and IPT schemes will be implemented in all four SAF fitness and conditioning centres in Khatib, Maju, Kranji and Bedok camps.

      Some fitness instructors and NSmen told Channel NewsAsia they were briefed earlier on the new remedial training programme.

      Physical training instructor Khairuddin Rahmat said: "So, at least when they come, they know what they want. If let's say they can't run, they can improve on their running, if they wish to improve on their running, they can select it. If they don't wish (to), they find all the training boring, they can try for the sports and games."

      An NSman who declined to be named said: "It was the PTIs, the physical trainers, who briefed us about the stations two weeks ago. I think it's a positive development. You know if they give us a chance to choose whatever stations we want to do, I think we're motivated to work harder and try to pass our test."

      Ministry of Defence had announced a new IPPT format that saw the scrapping of standing broad jump and chin up stations. The new IPPT scheme will consist of only three stations - a 2.4km run, sit-ups and push-ups. The aim was to keep NS personnel healthy and help them pass the annual IPPT test.

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • Permanent Residents (PRs) who fail to register or enlist for National Service (NS) face serious consequences. In a written Parliamentary reply, Defence Minister Ng Eng Hen said that these PRs have committed an offence under the Enlistment Act.

      He said they are NS defaulters and must answer for their NS offences. Upon conviction, they face a fine or a jail term. Dr Ng was responding to a question by Nominated Member of Parliament Eugene Tan. He said those who renounce their PR status before serving their NS liability face serious consequences when they apply for work and study.

      Dr Ng said that according to records, no such persons have been granted re-instatement of PR or citizenship. He added that the policy has been progressively tightened such that no NS-liable PR who renounced his PR status in the last decade has been granted approval for work or study.

      For former PRs who fail to serve NS, any immediate or future applications for renewal of their parents' and immediate family members' Re-Entry Permits may be adversely affected, including curtailment of the Re-Entry Permit.

      Source: Singapore News, 5 August 2014

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • Welcome to Community Health Assist Scheme (CHAS)

      Blue_HA_Card_2014_NoName   Orange_HA_Card_2014_NoName   

        
      The Community Health Assist Scheme (CHAS) is a scheme by the Ministry of Health (MOH) that provides accessible and affordable medical and dental care to Singapore Citizens.

      Singapore Citizens of all ages are eligible for CHAS if they meet the following criteria: 

       

          • Household monthly income per person of $1,800 and below; OR
          • Annual Value (AV) of residence as reflected on NRIC of $21,000 and below for households with no income

       

      Family members (related by blood, marriage and/or legal adoption) living at the same address, as reflected on their NRICs, will need to apply together on one application form. All the family members’ income will contribute towards the household monthly income per person.

      Members of the public who are on Public Assistance (PA) scheme do not need to apply as they are already eligible for CHAS. 

       

      Household monthly income per person is calculated by taking the total household monthly income divided by the total number of family members living together.

       

         HMI Illustration

       

      Application

      You can pick up a CHAS application form at any Public Hospital, Polyclinic, Community Centre and Club (CC) or Community Development Council (CDC). Alternatively, you can download the application form here. Only one application form is required for each household.

      Please send the completed and signed application form to P.O. Box 680, Bukit Merah Central Post Office, Singapore 911536, with clear copies of the passports or visit passes for family members who are foreigners

      Submission of NRIC and birth certificate photocopies for Singapore Citizens and Permanent Residents are no longer required. If you have any family members who are foreigners, we would still require photocopies of their visit pass or passport for verification purpose. You can continue to use the existing form marked "Jan 2014" for your application. The new application forms marked "Apr 2014" reflecting this change in requirement will be available at a later date.

      Further details @ www.chas.sg

      Edited by eac 06 Aug `14, 10:00AM
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
    • Please call the 24/7 NS hotline at 1800-3676767 to speak to a customer service officer. 

  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03
  • Moderator
    Executive
    eac's Avatar
    3,509 posts since Dec '03