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  • Moderator
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    • The new SAF Volunteer Corps - a unit under the Singapore Armed Forces - is for those not required to do National Service but are willing to contribute to the country's national defence.

      Those keen to volunteer in the army can start applying from Monday (Oct 13, 2014). The new SAF Volunteer Corps - a unit under the Singapore Armed Forces - is aiming to recruit 100 to 150 people in its first year, with the first batch to be drafted in next March. It is for those not required to do National Service but are willing to contribute to the country's national defence.

      The scheme is open to female Singaporeans, first generation permanent residents, and new citizens - between 18 and 45 years old. Applicants will undergo a medical screening and interview to assess if they have the right attitude for military service.

      Colonel Mike Tan, Commander of SAF Volunteer Corps, said: "National Service remains the cornerstone of Singapore's national defence and everyone has a part to play to support this. The SAFVC is an important commitment for individuals who are willing to take a step forward to be trained in roles that support the SAF and do their part for national defence."

      The Volunteer Corps was one of 30 recommendations made by the Committee to Strengthen National Service (CSNS) earlier this year.

      Applicants can indicate the roles they want to serve in, from medical to engineering and naval operations. But some roles have certain requirements. For example, those applying as field psychologists must have at least three years of professional work experience. And they can switch roles at a later stage.

      Colonel Mike Tan said: "'Re-roling' is possible. Somebody wishing to be a security trooper at first may find later that he or she is more suited to be in the business of information. We have facilitated this (role switching) as part of the SAFVC scheme."

      SINGLE-TRACK SCHEME FOR VOLUNTEERS

      Volunteers will be placed on a single-track scheme to establish an identity for the Corps. Previously, a two-track - operations or specialist scheme - was floated.

      Colonel Mike Tan said: "It is very important for identity purposes that we have one track. Everybody that comes in is trained during the basic training in a same way so that they establish a certain identity for the Volunteer Corps. The other thing is that as we worked along the feasibility of having a two-track system versus a one-track system, we found that the one-track system is easier to administer and allows for greater flexibility for people to want to re-role."

      Volunteers will serve seven days each year, and be deployed alongside NSmen and regulars doing the same role. Under a ranking structure, volunteers will start off as an SV Trainee, and can be promoted based on their performance and length of service. The highest rank they can attain is SV 4.

      UP TO THREE TRAINING CYCLES FOR VOLUNTEERS

      They also have to undergo at least three training cycles:

      1. A two-week basic training for an understanding of national defence. Key features include a field camp and hand-grenade live throw. Volunteers can choose to either stay in camp for two weeks while undergoing this basic training or take up modular courses over a series of weekends.

      2. A week-long qualification training, tailored for specific roles. For instance, volunteer nurses will train in the SAF Medical Training Institute and undergo on-the-job training.

      3. The advanced course will be for roles requiring additional training, like close combat and equipment training for security troopers.

      For both the qualification and advanced training, volunteers can opt for a one-week in-camp training or take modular courses over a series of weekends.

      VOLUNTEERS TO GET SERVICE BENEFITS

      Volunteers will also get service benefits like meal and transport claims, and treatment at SAF medical and dental centres during call-ups. Career professionals will also get make-up pay for their service. Other benefits include being placed under the SAF Group Term Life Insurance coverage during call-ups. 

      But volunteers will not receive allowance increment even if they are promoted. Volunteers also have to seek deferment from the SAF Volunteer Affairs Department if they are unable to serve their call-ups. And should they decide to leave the Corps, they have to give three months' advance notice. While under the Corps, they will also be subjected to the disciplinary framework based on military law.

      ASPIRING VOLUNTEERS KEEN TO SIGN UP

      Some had planned to sign up as volunteers, even before applications opened. Singaporean Kweh Ting Ting had expressed her interest to Mindef through an email. The 27-year-old, who works as a coordinator for a company selling biomedical laboratory equipment, said she is able to contribute in the administrative and logistics department.

      "This is something that I wanted to do and try since young. For females, we don't go through National Service. So this lets us open up and lets us see different vocations," she said.

      Another hopeful is Calven Bland, a PR who has lived in Singapore for nine years. The 42-year-old business development manager, who is married to a Singaporean, said he sees volunteering in the army as a way of giving back to the community and a continuation of his military background.

      He said: "I come from a military background. My family back in New Zealand have all served in the military. I used to serve, and I see this as a continuation of that tradition within my family. Secondly, if we have children, my son will have to serve National Service and I think it's important that as a father, I have some kind of an affinity with the Singapore Armed Forces to pass on to any children I have."

      The scheme has raised questions about PRs using it to fast-track their citizenship process, but some like Mr Bland said that is not the intention.

      He said: "I am a PR now and I don't intend to go for citizenship yet. I am a New Zealander and my wife is a Singaporean. So, I think we have quite a good balance. I'm not looking at this as a platform for fast-tracking any citizenship application."

      Colonel Mike Tan said it is important to send a clear message to potential volunteers that they should come forward to volunteer because they want to serve and also in appreciation of the security that they have benefited. "So, motivation is a very important thing for us," he added.

      APPLY ONLINE

      Three recruitment drives will be held after applications open on 13 October 2014. The Volunteer Corps will be based in Maju Camp. Those keen to volunteer can apply online at the SAFVC website or get a hardcopy form from the Central Manpower Base (CMPB). 

      - CNA/ir

      Edited by eac 15 Oct `14, 11:42PM
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    •  

      Source: http://iprep.ns.sg/

      NS BMT Enlistment schedule

      Pre-enlistees will be required to complete pre-enlistment procedures and medical screening before they are scheduled for enlistment.

      They will be scheduled for enlistment into the respective enlistment intakes based on numerous considerations such as the medical & physical fitness and educational qualifications of the individual, as well as the manpower and operational requirements of the various intakes.

      In general, pre-enlistees from the same 'A' level/International Baccalaureate (IB) or polytechnic cohort are enlisted over two intakes due to capacity constraints at the NS training schools. For example, 'A' level/ IB holders who graduate in Nov/Dec are typically enlisted in the Dec and Mar quarterly intakes. Polytechnic diploma holders who graduate in Mar/Apr are typically enlisted in the Jun and Sep quarterly intakes. ITE certificate holders and pre-enlistees with other qualifications are enlisted throughout the year.

      Pre-enlistees can only be assigned to an enlistment intake after being certified medically fit for enlistment at the pre-enlistment medical screening. Pre-enlistees will receive Enlistment Notices to notify them of their enlistment date about 2 months before their scheduled enlistment.

      Notes:

      Pre-enlistees who are graded PES A/B1 and who attained a NAPFA Silver or Gold award in the 12 months before their enlistment date will be enlisted for their 9-week BMT directly. Pre-enlistees with PES A/B1 but who have not attained a NAPFA Silver or Gold award in the 12 months before their enlistment date will be enlisted into an 8-week PTP prior to the commencement of their 9-week BMT.

      Enlistment dates are subjected to adjustment, due to operational requirements.

      If you have queries regarding your enlistment date or the enlistment schedule, please call 1800-eNSNSNS (1800-367 6767) for assistance.

      Source: http://iprep.ns.sg/

       

      Edited by eac 11 Oct `14, 8:42PM
  • Executive
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  • Executive
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  • Moderator
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    3,571 posts since Dec '03
    • All the relevant information are already on this page as mentioned above.

      Please read through carefully and thoroughly.

       

      Edited by eac 08 Oct `14, 10:10PM
  • Moderator
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  • Moderator
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    3,571 posts since Dec '03
    • FYI, PES is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PULHHEEMS.


      1) Go to Public Hospital / Private Specialist.

      Note: You will be classified as a subsidised patient if your first visit is via:

      • Referral letter from a Government Restructured Hospital under subsidised status, A&E, Polyclinic or SAF, without specifying a specialist by name.
      • Discharge from inpatient class B2 or C without specifying a specialist by name.


      2)
      Consult specialist, and do whatever medical check ups required. E.g. physical exam, blood test, x-ray, CT scan, MRI scan.

       

      3) Specialist gave a finalised clinical diagnosis.

       

      4) Get the specialist to write you a memo which is to be given to SAF MO. Those who can and are willing to spend some more money can get him/her to write you a specialist report, which is more precise and detailed.

      Note: For not to waste time and money, please be more direct yet humble. Request the specialist to write about reviewing of PES and medical board / anything specific such as any excuses to your conditions.

       

      5) Book an medical review appointment using the eHealth module @ www.ns.sg (for NSman Reservists).

      Just go down to your camp medical centre (for NSFs).

      Call CMPB @ 6373 1340 to request another PES review (for Pre-Enlistees after CMPB Checkup).

       

      6) Make a trip down to the respective unit camp medical centre. Give the MO whatever supporting documents you have in hand. E.g. Specialist memo/report (most usually the case and highly recommended), x-ray films, CT/MRI scan report, blood investigation lab report... etc.

       

      7) MO will decide whether you are deemed eligible for KIV downgrade, according to the criterias set in the "PES Bible" directive. E.g. Diagnosis, Extent of Diagnosis, Degree of Diagnosis/Injury/Illness/Disease...etc.

       

      8) If deemed so, you will sign an acknowledgement notice of Medical Board, whereby your case statement is prepared for review discussion at the monthly medical board meet (usually at the Formation/Division HQ) with another NSF CPT MO and the Chairman (SAF Regular Medical Doctor of MAJOR rank or above). Your Medical Board result will be post mailed to you by your respective NSHRC (Formation NS Hub).

       

      Time and time again, the questions for Medical Review (Downgrade) is repetitive. Therefore, this serves as a general SOP for Medical Board.

       

      Extract from www.mindef.gov.sg/nsmen:
      It is crucial that you update your NS HRCs if you develop a new medical condition or if an existing medical condition has worsened, which may affect your ICT performance. This is so that arrangements will be made for you to attend a medical review at the SAF medical centre to assess your fitness condition for NS.

      You MUST bring along all your investigation results and memorandums from your external physician or specialist during your medical review. You may be given a medical certificate for ICT deferment, be scheduled for a medical board to downgrade you if your medical condition is significant, or be referred to a restructured hospital for further examination depending on the outcome of your medical review.

      If your medical condition is deemed suited for ICT participation by the medical officer, you will then be allowed to attend ICT.

  • Moderator
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    • Compensations for Service Injuries

      Service injuries are injuries sustained while serving NS. 

      This also includes injuries sustained when reporting for duty or going home after duty.

      You will get free medical treatment for such injuries even after ORD for lifetime.

      Remember to first report your injury to your unit MO. Also remember to collect and keep all documents relating to your injury and your treatment. These will help when you submit the injury report and seek claims.

      Source: http://iprep.ns.sg


      (A)    Service Injuries

      If you sustained an injury during your NS training, it may be considered as attributable to service only when service is the cause of injury. If you sustained an injury during ICT, you are required to report immediately to your unit’s Medical Officer and unit S1. This is so that your unit can arrange to attend to your injury, and document your injury sustained in your medical docket.

      Before MINDEF determines that an injury is attributable to service, you are responsible for bearing all medical expenses. Treatment for your injury must be sought at government or restructured hospitals at your eligible ward and referred to by a government or SAF Medical Officer.

      In the case of permanent disablement due to service injury, a medical board will be convened. Eligibility for disability compensation will be based on the degree of residual permanent disability as endorsed by the SAF Medical Board.

      If your service injury requires continuous medical or hospitalisation leave beyond your ICT period, you are eligible for a stepped-down compensation as a form of ex-gratia payment. Compensation will be based on your civilian pay or an equivalent regular serviceman’s pay (whichever is higher) if you do not receive any income from your employers. This ex-gratia payment is compensation for your loss of income during this period. Payment will cease when you are no longer on medical/hospitalisation leave or when disability compensation is paid, whichever is earlier.

       

      How does an injured serviceman make a claim for the medical costs incurred for service injury?

      The PMC (Personnel Management Centre) will issue all serviceman with the SI (Service Injury) Card if their injuries have been approved as attributable to service by the Pensions / Awards Officer. The serviceman must produce this card to be eligible for fully-subsidised medical treatment at the government / restructured hospitals.

      If the SI Card is not produced when seeking treatment, the serviceman will have to pay for all the medical cost first and seek reimbursement via the respective PMCs with the following documents:

      a. the original medical bills and payment receipts

      b. a memorandum from the attending doctor to prove that the treatment received was for his service injury.

      The serviceman is required to notify his PMC immediately when he loses his SI Card. There will be an administrative charge of $15 for each replacement of lost or defaced SI Card. He will need to make the payment via MINDEF Cashier / Internet and submit the receipt to the unit PMC before he will be issued a new SI Card.

      While waiting for the SI Card to be issued or replaced, the serviceman may approach the respective PMCs for the issuance of the SI Memo (a temporary identification document) for the fully-subsidised medical treatment.

      Source:www.mindef.gov.sg/imindef/press_room/faqs.html

  • Moderator
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    3,571 posts since Dec '03
    • Permanent PES C2 and below are non-combat-fit personnel, that's why they are exempted from IPPT with immediate effect.

      You'll most likely to be revocated as a Security Trooper (Service/ Non-combat) because you'll be transferred from the combat vocations to the combat service support vocations by the NS unit's S1 Manpower Branch. So the combatant allowance will ceased with effective date at the next month's payroll.

       

       

       

  • Moderator
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    •  

      All the relevant information are already on this page as mentioned above.

      Please read through carefully and thoroughly.

       

      Please report sick at A&E of any public hospital for more professional medical specialist assessment to get better MCs, medications, treatment and patient care.

       

       

  • Moderator
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    3,571 posts since Dec '03
    • 1. What is meant by no longer liable for National Service?

      Under the Enlistment Act, Chapter 93, NSmen will not be liable for NS call-ups when they reach the statutory age limit of 40 for Warrant Officers, Specialists and Enlistees (WOSEs) and 50 for Officers. In other words, personnel reaching the stated statutory age limit will no longer be liable to be called up for any NS activities such as ICT, IPPT, mobilisation etc.


      2. What should I do to my SAF personal equipment now that I have completed my NS liability?

      You may dispose the items in the normal ways as long as the items do not end up in an unauthorised usage. Alternatively, you may return the items to any SAF.eMart outlet.

      3. Do I have to keep the notification letter?

      Your National Service liability status will have been updated in our system once you reached your statutory age limit. There is hence no requirement for you to keep the notification letter unless you just want to retain it for reference.


      4. How can I go about obtaining a replacement copy of the notification letter?

      As highlighted in para 3, there is actually no requirement for you to keep the notification letter. Should you however still require a replacement copy, you may contact NS Call Centre at 1800-3676767 or email us at [email protected]


      5. Will all NSmen who reach their statutory age receive the notification letter?

      Generally, all NSmen will receive the notification letters except for those who are released and discharged on medical grounds or those who renounced their citizenship.


      6. Do I still need to apply for Exit Permit or inform MINDEF Notification Centre when I travel overseas henceforth?

      No.


      7. Will I still enjoy the NSmen tax relief now that I have completed my NS liability?

      Yes. Generally, all NSmen will continue to enjoy a tax relief of S$1,500.00 from their taxable income unless subsequently revoked by the Proper Authority.


      8. Am I eligible or will I be allowed to continue my SAFRA membership upon reaching my statutory age limit?

      For details on SAFRA membership, you may wish to contact SAFRA at 1800-3779800 or logon to www.safra.sg.

      Edited by eac 06 Oct `14, 2:35PM
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    • NS have counselling hotlines for you to call if need arises.
      The counsellors are experienced professionals.

      You can call them at the following counselling hotlines:

      • SAF : 1800-278 0022 (SAF Counselling Hotline)
      • SPF : 1800-255 1151 (Police Psychology Service Department)
      • SCDF: 1800-286 6666 (SCDF Counselling Hotline)

       

      If you think you have been treated unfairly, you can bring up the case to your Commander. We will listen to your case. Do remember to bring along all facts and supporting documents.

      We will do our best to address your concerns. Servicemen are to seek redress through proper channels. Together, we can address your issue more expeditiously.

      ================================================================

       

      COUNSELLING

      The SAF seeks to promote the well-being of every serviceman by providing
      counselling support for those whom might be facing difficulties coping with their
      personal or work/training related problems. Servicemen who are experiencing
      difficulties can seek help through the avenues described below.


      Commander interviews of all recruits are conducted within 48 hours of enlistment into full-time NS. Regular interviews are subsequently conducted on a monthly basis during the PTP/BMT phase. Special interviews are also granted upon request. Servicemen can highlight their difficulties during these interviews for assistance.

      Orientation Officers identify, assist and counsel BMT recruits with adjustment
      and/or other personal problems.

      NS SAF Counselling Hotline is a 24-hour confidential telephone
      counselling service provided by the SAF Counselling Centre. Manned by
      trained counselling personnel, the SAF Counselling Hotline offers a crisis
      and telephone counselling service to all servicemen. Callers may
      choose to remain anonymous. Face to face counselling is also available
      at the SAF Counselling Centre upon request/referral.

      SAF Paracounselling Scheme
      complements other existing counselling
      services and provides another avenue of help at the unit level for those who
      need help to deal more effectively with their problems. Paracounsellors are
      specially selected, trained by and work closely under the professional guidance
      and support of counsellors from the SAF Counselling Centre. Paracounsellors
      can be identified through their identification badges as well as through publicity
      posters displayed in their units.

      ================================================================

       

      Being psychologically prepared is all about knowing what to expect and being prepared for it.

      To be better prepared, you can participate in Total Defence activities and Open Houses organised by the SAF/SPF/SCDF.

      Perhaps you should also talk to your family members and friends who have lived the NS experience. The more you discuss with others, the more comfortable and mentally prepared you’ll become.

      Because NS life is different from civilian life before enlistment, there are many adjustments you need to make.

      A good way to cope is to get support from your buddy and fellow recruits. They are going through the same tough training as you, so talking to one another will help relieve some tension.

      In most evenings during your leisure time, you’ll also have some time to call your family or loved ones to talk. They can give you emotional support during NS.

      You can have a one-on-one interview sessions with your officer to highlight any problems you may have. If you have a personal or family problem that need to be addressed, do let the officer know—he may be able to give you some advice or time off to settle your problems.

      Life in NS revolves around structure, routine and discipline. This helps us stay united as a uniformed organisation as well as imparts the rigours necessary to protect our nation and citizens.

      This does not mean there is just work and no play. In fact, after a few weeks in NS and you’ll find new friends and new reasons to smile!

      As a soldier, one of the biggest adjustments you’ll have to make quickly is in regimentation and discipline.

      Being in a uniformed organisation, you’ll have to obey orders from your superiors. Thus some of you may feel a sudden lack of freedom to do what you want and you may find yourself having difficulties accepting authority initially.

      Regimentation and discipline build strong character and toughness, so that you’ll be tough enough to handle difficult combat, crime-fighting or rescue situations without giving up or breaking down.

      When you first enlist into NS, you may have concerns of being in a new territory, with new faces and new things to do. But don’t let this get to you. Just remember the saying that “when the going gets tough, the tough gets going”.

      Following are some tips on what you can do to prepare yourself psychologically:

      • Adopt a positive perception
      • Build up physical stamina
      • Develop good working attitude and habits
      • Overcome psychological stress
      • Adopt teamwork spirit
      • Learn to be independent
      • Set realistic expectations

      You can also speak to your friends or family members who have been through NS. Ask them to share their stories. The sharing will help you reduce some of your fears, uncertainties and doubts.

      During NS you’ll be living with different people.

      Because these people come from different backgrounds, they may not think like you do or react to situations like you would. Instead of trying to select your type of people, you should cherish the diversity. This is a chance for you to learn more about your fellow mates and their cultures.

      You’ll find that you have many opportunities to absorb the different cultures—during training, eating, chatting or just seeing and listening. Take these opportunities and learn from people around you, you’ll have a much better appreciation of Singapore’s cultural diversity.

      Samaritans of Singapore (SOS): 1800-2214444

      Singapore Association for Mental Health: 1800-2837019

      Sage Counselling Centre: 1800-5555555

      Care Corner Mandarin Counselling: 1800-3535800

  • Moderator
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    • Source: www.ns.sg

      Military Justice System in the SAF

      1. Overview
      The military justice system in the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) is expected to treat every service personnel fairly and equally, regardless of race, rank or vocation.

       
      2. Multi-levelled Approach

      The military justice system is based on the SAF Act, which was implemented in 1972. All servicemen are subjected to the SAF Act, SAF Regulations, and orders of whatever form issued pursuant to them.

      While discipline is paramount in the military, not all offences committed by SAF servicemen are dealt with by formal investigations and charges. Essentially, offenders can be dealt with either by way of informal or formal punishment systems.

       
      3. Informal Punishment System
      Commanders are empowered to mete out informal punishments like push-ups and weekend confinement to servicemen who have committed disciplinary breaches, like being late, sluggish, or improperly dressed.

       

      4. Formal Punishment System
      If the offence that a serviceman committed is of a more serious nature, he may be formally dealt with by his disciplinary officer by way of a summary trial, or brought before a subordinate military court (more commonly known as the General Court Martial or GCM).

      (a) Summary Trial

      The offences that can be dealt with by summary trial are essentially military offences, such as absence without leave (AWOL), non-compliance with lawful orders or insubordination.

      Depending on the rank of the serviceman in question, and the type of the disciplinary body hearing the case, the possible sentences that may be imposed can vary, and these can include fines or detention.

      The summary trial is carried out in accordance with relevant SAF regulations, and the records of the summary trial are sent to the office of the Director, Legal Services of the SAF.

      (b) General Court Martial

      The General Court Martial exists as a separate forum from that of the summary trial. Unlike the summary trial, the GCM can deal with a wider range of offences, and can impose a wider range of punishments including imprisonment and discharge, on top of sentences like detention and fines. The GCM is also a more public and open forum, and its proceedings are conducted using similar legal rules and procedures as those used in a civil criminal court.

      Generally, only serious offences investigated by the Military Police Command, and which are referred to the office of the Director of Legal Services, will result in the accused serviceman being charged in a GCM. In such a case, a military prosecutor will draw up a formal charge sheet and present it before the GCM.

      General Courts Martial can be further sub-divided into two categories, namely the Panel Courts Martial - consisting of a President and usually two other members, and Judge Courts Martial - consisting of a single President only.

      Currently, the practice is for military offences to be heard by Panel Courts Martial, while civil offences like misuse of drugs and penal code offences may be dealt with by a Judge Court Martial.


      The current policy is also for an NSman, who is or was a District Judge in the Subordinate Courts, to preside in a GCM. There are currently 10 NSmen who have been appointed by the Armed Forces Council to perform duty as President of a court martial. They are rostered by the Registrar of the Subordinate Military Court to hear cases during their in-camp training. In the case of a Panel Court Martial, the other two members are rostered from among some 155 military officers appointed by the Chief of Defence Force.

       
      5. Ways to Seek Redress

      There are numerous safeguards and avenues set out in the military justice system for an SAF serviceman to seek redress if he is unhappy about the punishment imposed on him.

      Generally, a serviceman who is dissatisfied with an informal punishment meted out to him may request a higher level commander to review the punishment, or request for formal disciplinary dealing.

      In the case of a summary trial, a serviceman brought before the disciplinary officer may elect instead to be tried by a court martial. Alternatively, an aggrieved serviceman may request that his conviction or punishment imposed at the summary trial be reviewed by MINDEF's Director Manpower (a delegated authority of the Armed Forces Council).

      In the case of a GCM, a serviceman may choose to be represented by a lawyer or an SAF defending officer if his case will be heard by a court martial. The SAF has about 200 trained defending officers. While an SAF defending officer comes free to the serviceman, he has to bear the cost of engaging a lawyer. At the end of the trial, a serviceman who is dissatisfied with the decision of the court martial may petition the Reviewing Authority (the AFC or a committee of its members) for a review of his case. The serviceman can also appeal to the Military Court of Appeal (MCA) for a reconsideration of his conviction, or his sentence, or both.

      The MCA, when convened to hear an appeal, sits as a panel of five members. Heading the MCA is a President, who is appointed by the Chief Justice. By law, he must be a person qualified to be a Judge of the Supreme Court. The current President of the MCA is Justice Choo Han Teck. Four other members - two civilian members who are qualified legal practitioners with at least five years experience each, and two senior military officers - make up the rest of the MCA. The MCA is the highest court in the military justice system.

       
      6. Impartial Hearings
      It is important to recognise that the GCM and the MCA are tribunals headed by presidents who are outside the SAF chain of command.

      Being an "outsider", the president of these forums will hear the case impartially like any other civil criminal case. The proceedings in the GCM and the MCA are also heard in a public forum, and these military courts adopt many of the same legal procedures and safeguards as that used in the civil criminal courts. All servicemen formally charged with an offence can bring their case to these forums.

       

       

      Singapore Armed Forces Military Police Command
      (SAFMPC/ 新加坡武装部队宪兵司令部)

      The formation is headed by the Command Headquarters which oversees its daily operations, and supported by four units specialising in the various specific operational responsibilities of the SAF MPC.

      The four units are:

      Military Police Enforcement Unit (MPEU): The unit consists of the Law Enforcement and Ceremonial Company (LECC), the Security Operation Unit (SOU) and the Special Security and Protection (SSP) Branch. It is the active wing of the SAF MPC and executes most of the operational and ceremonial duties and roles carried out by the SAF MPC.

      The LECC was formed by combining the former Active Provost Company (APC) and the former Zone Provost Company (ZPC). Its duties include most of the important ceremonial duties required within the SAF as previously handled by the APC, and a traffic platoon which ensures the compliance of traffic regulations by military personnel on the road as well as performing escort duties. It also performs regular raids for contraband and/or miscreants on various camps of the SAF as was conducted by the ZPC. Enforcement Platoon (also known as Platoon 2) performs regular operations in residential areas, workplaces, and many public places such as shopping centres, clubs and eating outlets to apprehend desertersAWOLoffenders, drug addicts and other military criminals. They work closely with the Singapore Police Force and are often in very dangerous situations and are extremely well trained for handling the varied scenarios that they find themselves in. This is also the platoon that enforces the public image of the SAF by booking offenders who smoke in uniform and commit other offences in uniform while in the eye of the public. It is worth noting that they perform undercover security operations for high-key events like the National Day Parade and the Youth Olympic Games. The security of Mowbray Station is overseen by a platoon who is also in charge of registering and detaining suspects and offenders of military crimes in holding cells. The station is similar to a civilian police station and it is usually the first stop for detainees before their transfer to the detention barracks after conviction in military courts, or a temporary holding cell for servicemen placed under Closed Arrest. The investigative branch for the SAF, the Special Investigation Branch (SIB) investigates higher-order military crimes that requires specialised handling. Since 31 December 8, MPEU has heralded the inclusion of a new branch within its ranks. The Security Support and Protection (SSP) Branch is involved in sensitive operations so no further information is available.

      SAF Detention Barracks (SAFDB): Headed by a commandant, DB consists of MPs in charge of supervision of detainees of the SAF who have been convicted in military courts.

      Military Police Training School (MPTS): Formerly known as the School of Provost, MPTS is in charge of equipping trainees with necessary and fundamental military policing skills as well as instilling in them a high standard of discipline through the vocational courses and specialised courses such as the Silent Precision Drill Courses. MPTS also legislation courses for senior commanders all over the SAF. In addition, the SAF Military Working Dog Unit is a wing under MPTS and it is in charge of all dog training and doctrine matters of the SAF.

      SAF MP Command Head Quarters (HQ): The Head Quarters of the Command comprises various branches, namely the Human Resource (HR), Intelligences and Security Branch (ISB), General Staff Branch (GS), the Special Investigation Branch (SIB) and Logistic Branch. Each branch is headed by a branch head who serves concurrently as the Command's Manpower, Intelligence, Ops and Training and Logistics Officer.

      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      FAQs

      SAF Detention Barracks

      1. Are the detainees being medically taken care of?

      Primary health care of detainees is of utmost importance to us. All detainees will be given adequate medical care during their incarceration. Our medical services are also supported by the Tengah Airbase Medical Centre, NUH and also Changi General Hospital if the need arises.

      2. Can I write a letter to a detainee?
      Yes.

      3. I have just received a Visit Notification Letter, but the schedule visit date stated therein has already lapsed. How can I visit the detainee?
      You can contact the Records Office at 6424 6666 to arrange for another appointment date.

      4. Can anyone besides the parent unit of the detainees pick up the detainee on the day of their release?
      At no time shall the detainee/military prisoner be released from the detention barracks/military prison as the case may be, to his family or any other party.

      5.. Can the detainee write letters while serving detention in Detention Barracks?
      Every detainee and military prisoner shall be allowed to write one letter per week.

      6. What are the visiting days and what is the duration of the visit?
      Visiting days are on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, and the first appointment starts from 1.30pm and ends at 3.00pm. Visitors are allowed to visit the detainee for 30 minutes.

      7. How many visits is the serviceman entitled to?
      Each serviceman is entitled to one visit per week.

      8. What happens if the family members can't turn up on the date specified for their first visit?
      The family members can call Records Office of SAF Detention Barracks at 6424 6666 and arrange for another date and time.

      9. What is the dress code of the family members when they come for parent visit?
      The family must wear appropriately when they come for parent visit. SAF Detention Barracks will send a slip indicating the dress code together with the parent-visiting letter.
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    • FAQs on Revisions of Exit Control Measures for Pre-Enlistees

      Q1. Why must MINDEF impose exit controls on NS-liable males?

      Exit controls are necessary to ensure that NS-liable males who have gone overseas to study or reside at a young age return to fulfil their NS responsibilities.

      Q2. Why can't MINDEF exempt young males aged 13 to 16½ from exit controls?

      Exit control measures have to be applied at a reasonably younger age so that they could be effective to prevent those who leave at a younger age defaulting on their NS responsibilities

      Q3. Why has MINDEF decided to shift the starting age for exit controls from age 11 to 13?

      Currently, the starting age of exit controls is pegged at age 11, the age where Singaporeans used to be issued with NRICs. With Singaporeans now being issued NRICs at age 15, there is no longer a special reason to retain age 11 as the starting age for exit controls. MINDEF has therefore decided to set it at age 13, which is when students would have just started their secondary school education.

      Q4. Why is MINDEF removing passport controls?

      With the introduction of the non-extendable Singapore Biometric passport, a continuation of passport controls for young males would mean that they will have to pay for a new biometric passport upon expiry each time. This will result in greater inconvenience and higher cost for young males and their families. MINDEF has therefore decided to remove passport controls.

      Q5. Will young males holding non-biometric Singapore passport be given full validity?

      Those holding non-biometric Singapore Passports will also have their passports extended for the full duration of 5 or 10 years. This is however subject to the remaining lifespan of the passport.

      Q6. Why does MINDEF require young males to apply for an exit permit?

      With the removal of passport controls, it is necessary for MINDEF to extend exit permit requirements (which currently affect only NS-liable males aged 16½ and above) to males aged 13 and above in order to ensure that young males who go overseas return to serve NS. However, to avoid inconveniencing those who make short overseas trips during vacations, exit permits will only be required for overseas trips of 3 months or more.

      Q7. Will young males who require exit permits be required to furnish a bond?

      Young males aged 13 to 16½ will only be required to furnish a bond if they require an exit permit of 2 years or more. This arrangement is similar to the current practice where only young males who require a passport validity of more than 2 years are required to furnish a bond.

      Males aged 16½ to enlistment are approaching the age of enlistment. They are therefore subject to more stringent exit controls to deter potential NS defaulters. The current practice of requiring such males to furnish a bond if they require an exit permit of 3 months or more will continue.

      Q8. Will young males aged 13 to 16½ who fail to apply for an exit permit be sentenced to imprisonment?

      The penalty regime for exit permit offences of young males aged 13 to 16½ will be a fine of up to $2,000, with no custodial sentences. They will however be subject to harsher penalties should they continue to be in breach of the Enlistment Act after that age 16½.

      Males above 16½ years who travel and remain overseas without applying for an exit permit will be prosecuted under the Enlistment Act. They will be liable upon conviction to a fine of up to $10,000 or imprisonment for a term not exceeding 3 years or both.

      Q9. How will MINDEF deal with young males who do not understand their obligations under the Enlistment Act or those who have parents/guardians who deliberately encourage them to be in breach of the Enlistment Act?

      MINDEF recognises that some young males may not be sufficiently mature to understand their obligations under the Enlistment Act. Their parents or guardians may also have been instrumental in decisions, which are in contravention of the Enlistment Act. Parents and guardians would therefore also be liable for the exit permit offences of their children or wards of ages 13 to 16½, so that the penalty can be imposed on their parents or guardians when the circumstances warrant it. MINDEF will consider the circumstances of the case carefully before deciding whether to issue warnings, composition fines or to charge the parent or guardian in court.

      Q10. When will the revised exit controls take effect?

      The revised exit control measures will be introduced together with the launch of the Singapore Biometric Passport in the later half of the year.

      Q11. With the removal of passport controls, what would be the arrangement for young males who have furnished bonds for extended passport validity under the Immigration Bonding Scheme?

      As males below the age of 13 will no longer come under the ambit of passport or exit control, those who had furnished a bond to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority under the Immigration Bonding Scheme will have their bonds released.

      Males aged 13 to 16½ currently bonded in order to be issued with passports of extended validity will be required to apply for an exit permit for overseas trips of 3 months or more. Those who require an exit permit of 2 years or more will continue to be bonded. Those who require an exit permit of less than 2 years or who do not require an exit permit will have their bonds released.

      Q12. If MINDEF continues with passport controls, how many pre-enlistees would be inconvenienced by having to apply for a new biometric passport every year?

      According to the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority, there are approximately 120,000 pre-registrants (males aged 11 to 16½) and 100,000 registrants (males aged 16½ to enlistment) passport holders. With the passport validity of pre-registrants and registrants capped at 2 years and 1 year respectively, we would expect a pre-registrant to have to apply for a new passport once in 2 years and a registrant once a year. On average, 100,000 have their passports extended annually.

      Edited by eac 04 Oct `14, 10:50AM
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    • Singapore Statutes: http://statutes.agc.gov.sg

      1. The NS Enlistment Act.
      2. SAF Act

      Absence without leave
      22. —(1) Every person subject to military law who is absent without leave from service in the Singapore Armed Forces or from the place where he is lawfully required for the time being to be shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction by a subordinate military court to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 2 years or any less punishment authorised by this Act.

       

      (2) It shall be a defence for any person charged under this section to prove that his absence was a result of circumstances over which he had no control.

       

      Desertion
      23. —(1) Every person subject to military law who deserts shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction by a subordinate military court to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 10 years or any less punishment authorised by this Act.

       

      (2) For the purposes of this section, a person deserts if he —

       

      (a) leaves or fails to attend at his place of duty in the Singapore Armed Forces with the intention of remaining permanently absent from duty without lawful authority, or, having left or failed to attend at his place of duty in the Singapore Armed Forces, thereafter forms the like intention; or

       

      (b) absents himself without leave with intent to avoid service or any particular service before the enemy,

       

      and references in this Act to desertion shall be construed accordingly.

       

      Failure to report deserters and absentees
      24. Every person subject to military law who, knowing that any other person has committed an offence under section 22 or 23 —

       

      (a) fails to report the fact without delay; or

       

      (b) fails to take any steps within his power to cause that person to be apprehended,

       

      shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction by a subordinate military court to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 2 years or any less punishment authorised by this Act.

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    • Under the Enlistment Act, NS-liable persons are enlisted at the earliest opportunity upon turning 18 years old. For those who are studying, MINDEF does allow some flexibility for them to complete their full-time studies up to the GCE 'A' Levels or Polytechnic Diploma (or their equivalent), both locally and overseas, before enlisting for NS. Those who have already embarked on their full-time studies but who do not meet the deferment conditions, will have to disrupt their studies and be enlisted for NS at the earliest opportunity scheduled by the Central Manpower Base (CMPB), including those who take up Singapore Permanent Residency in the midst of their studies.


      Local Studies in Government Schools
         
      GCE 'A' Level Studies and International Baccalaureate (IB) Studies

      NS-liable persons will be granted deferment for GCE 'A' Level and IB studies (and their equivalent) at Junior Colleges/ Millennia Institute/ Integrated Programme (IP) schools if they are able to commence the course* before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year.

      * For NS-liable persons who are pursuing their GCE 'A' Levels or IB in the IP schools, the deferment cut-off age will apply to the 5th year of study.

      Exceptions may be considered for students who do not meet these deferment cut-off ages, but are able to gain admission into Junior Colleges/ Millennia Institute/ IP schools.


      NS-liable persons who are returning from overseas and who wish to pursue studies in Junior Colleges/ Millennia Institute/ IP schools must seek prior approval from CMPB. They must do so before applying through the Ministry of Education (MOE)'s School Placement Exercise for Returning Singaporeans - Junior Colleges and Millennia Institute (SPERS-JC/MI), or before applying directly to the Junior Colleges/ Millennia Institute/ IP Schools. Persons who are deemed to have already attained a first education bar qualification (defined as GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications), be it locally or overseas, will not be granted deferment to pursue another first education bar qualification or another qualification below first education bar.

      Persons who have failed their General Paper (GP)/ Knowledge & Inquiry (KI) or obtained less than 3 H2 passes (excluding KI) in one sitting of the GCE 'A' Level examination will be considered for further deferment to repeat their GCE 'A' Level studies on a full-time basis, subject to one repeat only. Persons who have failed to attain the IB qualification will also be considered for further deferment to repeat their IB studies on a full-time basis, subject to one repeat only.

      Polytechnic Diploma Studies

      NS-liable persons will be granted deferment for Polytechnic Diploma studies (including Polytechnic Diploma through the Polytechnic Foundation Programme) and its equivalent qualifications (e.g. courses at the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts (NAFA) or the LaSalle College of the Arts) if they are able to commence the course before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year.

      NS-liable persons who graduated with NITEC/Higher NITEC qualification from ITE Colleges will be granted deferment for Polytechnic Diploma studies and its equivalent qualifications if they are able to commence the course before 21 years old as at 1st January of the course commencement year. Applications for deferment from ITE graduates who are above 21 years old as at 1st January of their course commencement year will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

      NS-liable persons who are returning from overseas and who wish to pursue Polytechnic Diploma studies and its equivalent qualifications must seek prior approval from CMPB before applying for their intended course of study. Persons who are deemed to have already attained a first education bar qualification (defined as GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications), be it locally or overseas, will not be granted deferment to pursue another first education bar qualification or another qualification below first education bar.

      Institute of Technical Education (ITE) Diploma Studies

      NS-liable persons who completed NITEC or Higher NITEC studies at ITE Colleges, will be granted deferment to pursue the Technical Engineer Diploma (TED) or Technical Diploma (TD) programmes at ITE Colleges if they are able to commence the course before 21 years old, as at 1st January of the course commencement year. They will be granted deferment to complete the academic phase only, and will be enlisted for full-time NS at the earliest opportunity upon completion of the academic phase. Deferment will not be granted for work attachments and internships. Applications for deferment from ITE graduates who are above 21 years old as at 1st January of their course commencement year will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

      NS-liable persons who are returning from overseas and who wish to pursue ITE Diploma studies must seek prior approval from CMPB before applying for their intended course of study. Persons who are deemed to have already attained a first education bar qualification (defined as GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications), be it locally or overseas, will not be granted deferment to pursue another first education bar qualification or another qualification below first education bar.

      NITEC and Higher NITEC Studies

      NS-liable persons will be granted deferment for NITEC or Higher NITEC courses at ITE Colleges if they are able to commence the course before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year.

      NS-liable persons who graduated with NITEC qualification from ITE Colleges will also be granted deferment for Higher NITEC courses if they are able to commence the course at ITE Colleges before 20 years old, as at 1st January of the course commencement year.

      NS-liable persons who are returning from overseas and who wish to pursue NITEC or Higher NITEC studies at ITE Colleges must seek prior approval from CMPB before applying for their intended course of study. Persons who are deemed to have already attained a first education bar qualification (defined as GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications), be it locally or overseas, will not be granted deferment to pursue another first education bar qualification or another qualification below first education bar.

      GCE 'O' and 'N' Level Courses

      NS-liable persons will generally be granted deferment to pursue GCE 'O' and 'N' Level studies at government, government-aided or independent secondary schools.

      An extension of deferment may be granted for those who wish to repeat their GCE 'N' or 'O' Level studies on a full-time basis, subject to one repeat only.

      Local Private Courses

      NS-liable persons who graduated before September 2011 may be granted deferment to pursue full-time studies (up to the GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications) at private institutions registered with the Council for Private Education (CPE), if they are able to commence the course before 18 years old, as at 1st January of the course commencement year. NS-liable persons graduating from September 2011 onwards may be granted deferment to pursue full-time studies (up to the GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or equivalent qualifications) at private institutions registered with the CPE, if they are able to commence their courses before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 & ITE students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year. The higher cut-off age will apply to courses commencing from 1st January 2012 onwards.

      Deferment for private courses will be considered on a stage-by-stage basis (i.e. a Certificate course and a Diploma course, if packaged together, will be treated as separate courses for the purpose of granting deferment). A new application for deferment must be made before the commencement of a new stage of studies. Deferment for the new stage of studies will be subject to the same cut-off age stated in the preceding paragraph.

      Overseas Studies
         
      NS-liable persons who graduated before September 2011 may be granted deferment to pursue full-time overseas studies (up to the GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or their equivalent qualifications) if they are able to commence the course before 18 years old, as at 1st January of the course commencement year. NS-liable persons graduating from September 2011 onwards may be granted deferment to pursue full-time overseas studies (up to the GCE 'A' Levels, Polytechnic Diploma or their equivalent qualifications) if they are able to commence their courses before 19 years old (for Secondary 4 students) or 20 years old (for Secondary 5 & ITE students), as at 1st January of the course commencement year. The higher cut-off age will apply to courses commencing from 1st January 2012 onwards.

      NS-liable persons will be required to apply for an exit permit for overseas trips of 3 months and longer and will be required to furnish a bond of $75,000 or an amount equivalent to 50% of the combined annual gross income of both parents for the preceding year, whichever is higher.

      Application for Deferment
         
      NS-liable persons may apply for deferment online at the NS portal (http://www.ns.sg) during NS registration and pre-enlistment documentation.

      Those applying for deferment to pursue local studies may be required to furnish documentary proof for verification upon CMPB's request. Upon CMPB's request, they will be required to submit to CMPB a letter from their school certifying their enrolment, their course of study, as well as their course commencement and completion dates.

      Those applying for deferment to pursue overseas studies must submit to CMPB a letter from their school certifying their enrolment, their course of study as well as their course commencement and completion dates. In addition, they must submit their parents' Income Tax Notices of Assessment (both local and overseas) for the preceding year.

      Those who subsequently wish to pursue or switch to a new course or institution must seek prior approval from CMPB.

      Notes: The information provided in this website are general guidelines. For further details, you may wish to contact the NS Call Centre at [email protected] or Tel:1800-3676767 (eNSNSNS).

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    • National-service-liable males who migrated from Singapore before age 11 and have not enjoyed significant socio-economic benefits of citizenship (e.g., applied for a Singapore identity card or studied in Singapore beyond the age of 11) are allowed to renounce their Singapore citizenship, but not before they turn 21.

      Until then, they are required to register for national service with Central Manpower Base and apply for a deferment.

      After turning 21, they are then eligible to renounce their Singapore citizenship.

      Generally, those who left Singapore after the age of 11 will be deemed to have enjoyed the socio-economic benefits of Singapore. They will not be allowed to renounce their Singapore citizenship without fulfilling NS obligations.

      NS-liable Persons with Dual Citizenship
       
      If your son has dual citizenship, it is still mandatory for him to register for NS when he reaches 16 1/2 years of age.  On turning 18 years of age, he has to serve 2 years of NS. 
       

      Singapore does not recognise dual citizenship. If your son decides to retain his Singapore Citizenship upon reaching 21 years of age, he is required to renounce his foreign citizenship.

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    • Those who are liable to serve national service but refuse are charged under the Enlistment Act. If convicted, they face three years' imprisonment and a fine of S$10,000.

      In parliament, Defence Minister provided some illustration of the punishments defaulters would face:

       

      • Where the default period exceeds two years but the defaulter is young enough to serve his full-time and operationally ready NS duties in full, MINDEF will press for a short jail sentence.

       

      • Where the defaulter has reached an age when he cannot serve his full-time NS in a combat vocation or fulfil his operationally ready NS obligations in full, a longer jail sentence to reflect the period of NS he has evaded may be appropriate.

       

      • Where the defaulter has reached an age when he cannot be called up for NS at all, a jail sentence up to the maximum of three years may be appropriate.

       

      Each year, a small number of people are convicted for their failure to enlist or refusal to be conscripted. Most of them were Jehovah's Witnesses, who are usually court-martialled and sentenced to three years' imprisonment, but they are usually held in a low-security detention facility and separated from other conscription offenders. The government does not consider conscientious objection to be a legal reason for refusal to serve NS. Since 1972, the publications of Jehovah's Witnesses have been outlawed in Singapore. This is commonly misinterpreted to mean that Jehovah's Witnesses themselves are outlawed in Singapore.

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    • If you are between 13 and 16.5 years old:
      You need to apply for an exit permit if you intend to travel or remain overseas for 3 months or longer. If you are remaining overseas for 2 years or longer, your parents/guardians will also need to furnish a bond, in the form of a Banker's Guarantee of S$75,000 or 50% of the combined annual gross income of both parents for the preceding year, whichever is higher.

      If you are above 16.5 and have not enlisted for NS:

      You need to apply for an exit permit if you intend to travel or remain overseas for 3 months or longer. Your parents/guardians will need to furnish a bond, in the form of a Banker's Guarantee of S$75,000 or 50% of the combined annual gross income of both parents for the preceding year, whichever is higher. 

      Those who require exit permit of 2 years or longer will be required to furnish a bond. This bonding requirement is similar to the current arrangement where security in the form of Banker's Guarantee must be furnished. The amount of the security bond is S$75,000 or 50% of the combined gross annual income of both parents for the preceding year, whichever is higher. The monetary bond requirement for male citizens who accompany their parents on overseas employment may be waived and they be bonded by deed with two sureties.

       

      Why must MINDEF impose exit controls on NS-liable males?

      Exit controls are necessary to ensure that NS-liable males who have gone overseas to study or reside at a young age return to fulfil their NS responsibilities.

      Will young males aged 13 to 16.5 who fail to apply for an exit permit be sentenced to imprisonment?

      The penalty for exit permit offences of young males aged 13 to 16.5 will be a fine of up to $2,000, with no custodial sentences. They will however be subjected to harsher penalties should they continue to breach of the Enlistment Act after age 16.5.

      Males above 16.5 years who travel and remain overseas without applying for an exit permit would have committed an offence under the Enlistment Act. They will be liable upon conviction to a fine of up to $10,000 or imprisonment for a term not exceeding 3 years or both.

  • Moderator
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    • NS BMT Enlistment schedule

      Pre-enlistees will be required to complete pre-enlistment procedures and medical screening before they are scheduled for enlistment.

      They will be scheduled for enlistment into the respective enlistment intakes based on numerous considerations such as the medical & physical fitness and educational qualifications of the individual, as well as the manpower and operational requirements of the various intakes.

      In general, pre-enlistees from the same 'A' level/International Baccalaureate (IB) or polytechnic cohort are enlisted over two intakes due to capacity constraints at the NS training schools. For example, 'A' level/ IB holders who graduate in Nov/Dec are typically enlisted in the Dec and Mar quarterly intakes. Polytechnic diploma holders who graduate in Mar/Apr are typically enlisted in the Jun and Sep quarterly intakes. ITE certificate holders and pre-enlistees with other qualifications are enlisted throughout the year.

      Pre-enlistees can only be assigned to an enlistment intake after being certified medically fit for enlistment at the pre-enlistment medical screening. Pre-enlistees will receive Enlistment Notices to notify them of their enlistment date about 2 months before their scheduled enlistment.

      Notes:

      Pre-enlistees who are graded PES A/B1 and who attained a NAPFA Silver or Gold award in the 12 months before their enlistment date will be enlisted for their 9-week BMT directly. Pre-enlistees with PES A/B1 but who have not attained a NAPFA Silver or Gold award in the 12 months before their enlistment date will be enlisted into an 8-week PTP prior to the commencement of their 9-week BMT.

      Enlistment dates are subjected to adjustment, due to operational requirements.

      If you have queries regarding your enlistment date or the enlistment schedule, please call 1800-eNSNSNS (1800-367 6767) for assistance.

      Edited by eac 03 Oct `14, 8:35PM
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    • http://customedia.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/too-good-to-be-true.jpg

      http://www.davidwygant.com/blog-images/wp-content/uploads//too-good-to-be-true.jpeg

      Internet Love Scam

      In the Internet love scam, the scammers, who could be foreigners, will befriend the victims through websites such as those related to online dating. There are various ways in which they perpetrate their scams. The victims will usually be asked to transfer a sum of money to a bank account. After the victims have transferred the money, the scammers may cease contact.

      Members of public are advised to be aware of such scams and to adopt the following measures:

      • Be wary of strangers who want to befriend you online, especially when they start asking for money;
      • Do not remit or transfer money to people whom you do not know well enough; and
      • Call Police immediately at '999' to report the case.

       

      Edited by eac 02 Oct `14, 10:38PM
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    • Please call the 24/7 NS hotline at 1800-3676767 to speak to a customer service officer.

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    • Central Manpower Base (CMPB)    
      Location: 3 Depot Road Singapore 109680    
           
      Operating hours : Mondays to Fridays 0900 hours to 1700 hours    
      Closed on Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays.

      Edited by eac 29 Sep `14, 2:48PM