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  • Sardaukar's Avatar
    366 posts since Feb '04
  • Short Ninja's Avatar
    8,421 posts since Jan '07
    • Vocational Assessment

      Upon completion of your pre-enlistment medical screening, you will be required to go through Vocational Assessment at the Vocational Assessment Centre (VAC). This is done using a battery of tests called the Manpower Aptitude Assessment System (MAPAS) to assess your mental abilities. This is so that we can maximize our limited manpower by putting people where their abilities can be best used.

      Your Vocational Assessment scores will affect important decisions, which include assignment to a vocation and selection to be a commander (Officer, Specialist).

      Therefore, you should put in as much effort as possible to do the tests well and accurately, as this will not only help the nation maximize it's limited manpower, but also help us place you into vocations that will make good use of your abilities.

      Click here for more information on the MAPAS tests and how to be prepared.

      Edited by eac 12 Apr `15, 12:57PM
  • jus-tea's Avatar
    347 posts since Dec '05
    • Refer: 

      strengthenns.sg

      The CSNS has recommended these measures for NSFs

      • Increase the number of experienced regular trainers to strengthen NS training
      • Enhance deployment by taking into account skills and preferences of servicemen
      • Increase proportion of officers and specialists from 30% to 40%
      • Accredit skills gained during full-time NS and reflect this in the Certificate of Service
      • Provide life and personal accident insurance coverage of $150,000 during service
      • Enlist servicemen between 4 and 6 months after post-secondary education
      • Explore ways to reduce transition time to work and further studies after full-time NS
      • Increase IPPT incentives by $100

      Click here for a comprehensive list of CSNS recommendations.

      Edited by eac 12 Apr `15, 1:02PM
  • RonDaGuy's Avatar
    227 posts since May '07
    • NS has been the cornerstone of our nation’s defence and security since independence. Our national servicemen form the backbone of the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF), Singapore Police Force (SPF) and Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF) that keep Singapore safe and secure.

      To date, more than 900,000 male Singaporeans have served NS and journeyed through this rite of passage. For many, this defining experience bonds servicemen from different backgrounds and across generations.

      The need for NS became clear when Singapore gained independence in 1965. It would not have been possible to raise a regular force of a sufficient size to protect this island state given our small population. On 21 February 1967, then Prime Minister Mr Lee Kuan Yew announced the introduction of full-time NS. Conscription began with 900 of 9,000 eligible conscripts enlisting for full-time NS, while the rest served part-time in the People’s Defence Force, the Vigilante Corps and the Special Constabulary. Full-time NS was extended to the SPF and SCDF in 1975 and 1981 respectively.

      For over 47 years, NS has evolved into a national institution that is well accepted and a part of our way of life.

      When NS was introduced, officers served three years and other ranks served two years, followed by ten years of reserve service. In 1971, the length of service was changed to two-and-a-half years for servicemen holding the rank of corporal and above. In 1983, the reservist training cycle was extended from 10 to 13 years, to meet operational needs.

      In 2005, arising from improvements in training and technology, the duration of full-time NS was reduced from two-and-a-half years to two years. The Operationally Ready National Service (ORNS) duration was shortened to ten years in 2006. (ORNS replaced the term “reservist” in 1994 to better signify the operational roles and readiness of our main fighting force.)

      The roles of national servicemen have changed over time. Our first few batches of enlistees were trained in infantry battalions. Enlistees also started joining the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) and Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) in 1969 and 1970 respectively. In 1975, the first intake of full-time Police National Servicemen was enlisted and deployed for peacetime and emergency functions, such as crime prevention patrols and protection of key installations, and preparation and training for national emergencies and disasters. The SCDF enlisted its first intake of NSFs in 1981 to provide emergency services to the nation during peacetime and crises.

      Since then, our servicemen’s roles have expanded. They are now trained for a wide spectrum of operations. In the SAF, our servicemen are trained to fight within units that have to operate in a decentralised manner and in urban terrain. They are also technologically savvy, and able to operate sophisticated equipment. This will enable the SAF to achieve mission success decisively and efficiently.

      Beyond protecting Singapore from armed conflicts, our servicemen are now involved in countering terrorism, dealing with the aftermath of natural disasters and tackling health epidemics. For instance, our NSFs and NSmen from the SAF and the Home Team aided relief efforts in Indonesia and Thailand in the wake of the Boxing Day tsunami of 2004, working shoulder to shoulder with our regular forces. Our SCDF NSmen have participated in a total of nine relief missions in the Asia-Pacific region, as part of Operation Lionheart. Back home, our SAF NSFs contributed to detection, contact tracing and quarantine management efforts during the SARS crisis in 2003. SAF medics were also deployed at Changi Airport to augment efforts to screen air travellers.

      The changing roles of our servicemen reflect the need for NS to evolve and keep pace with the changes in our society as well as our threat environment. This is necessary if NS is to remain relevant.

      NS, as the bedrock of our fighting force and national security, remains critical for Singapore’s continued survival and success. A strong defence underpins the peace and prosperity we enjoy, by safeguarding Singapore’s independence and sovereignty, as well as providing us with the political space and freedom to act in Singaporeans’ best interests.

      The turbulence and instability in our regional security environment in recent years underscore the continued importance of defence for this generation. Countries have become increasingly assertive over the maritime and territorial disputes in the East and South China Seas. Tensions in Northeast Asia in particular have risen, as overlapping claims intersect with historical animosities, domestic nationalism and changing power dynamics. We also have to contend with non-traditional threats such as terrorism, piracy, natural disasters and health epidemics. These unpredictable threats are complex, with no easy solutions.

      Edited by eac 12 Apr `15, 1:02PM
  • Gedanken's Avatar
    8,703 posts since Jul '03
    • Here's one for the CDO FAQ:

      Q: Are trainee CDOs forced to drink water out of drains and fight with stray dogs for their food?
      A: No.

      Laughing

  • RonDaGuy's Avatar
    227 posts since May '07
      • Establish the SAF Volunteer Corps to enable the broader community, especially women, first generation Permanent Residents and new citizens, to contribute to national defence [Applications for SAFVC are now open! Find out more here]
      • Restructure ACCORD to deepen engagement with employers, educational institutions and the community

        [Restructured ACCORD has been convened. Find out more at ACCORD Website]

      • Expand SAFRA and HomeTeamNS recreational facilities for servicemen to bond with their families and friends
      • Enhance the Family Recognition Voucher scheme to recognise more good performers during In-Camp Training
      • Enhance the awards for employers and individuals who are supportive of NS, including the introduction of an “NS Mark” to recognise companies with pro-NS policies
      • Strengthen community support for defence and security through the SAF Veterans’ League and Home Team veterans
      • Improve community recognition by supporting community-led initiatives that recognise servicemen and raise public awareness of NS

      Click here for a comprehensive list of CSNS recommendations.

      Edited by eac 12 Apr `15, 1:18PM
  • LazerLordz's Avatar
    35,169 posts since Apr '03
    • I'm for making this a sticky, but let's keep the flames to a minimum.

      Post your query and wait patiently for a response. No spamming will be tolerated

      This FAQ is for Guards/CDO/NDU BMT and conversion course queries.

      Note that due to the nature of these units, please observe OPSEC when you answer or discuess these queries.

      Thank you. Smile

  • k2406's Avatar
    213 posts since Jun '07
    • Guards Conversion Courses

      GOCC: Guards Officer Conversion Course

      GSCC: Guards Specialist Conversion Course

      GAIT: Guards Advanced Infantry Training Course

      Edited by eac 18 Apr `14, 4:17PM
  • Short Ninja's Avatar
    8,421 posts since Jan '07
    • Originally posted by Gedanken:
      Here's one for the CDO FAQ:

      Q: Are trainee CDOs forced to drink water out of drains and fight with stray dogs for their food?
      A: No.

      Laughing

      As you know some instructors are copycats doiing what their predecessors did and then some are down right comedians.Maybe that medic guy "Commando Platoon mate" was played a practical joke which he willfully participated and then turn the story into some kind of big fark green beret type of training Mr. Green

    • Ged,Is Tang Peck Onn still there in Changi?

  • Gedanken's Avatar
    8,703 posts since Jul '03
    • Originally posted by Short Ninja:
      As you know some instructors are copycats doiing what their predecessors did and then some are down right comedians.Maybe that medic guy "Commando Platoon mate" was played a practical joke which he willfully participated and then turn the story into some kind of big fark green beret type of training Mr. Green

      Now that's a realistic scenario. Smile

      I can't recall ever meeting a Tang Peck Onn - then again, he could have been in HQ CDO at the time.

    • Anyway, seriously:

      Q: How siong is CDO training?
      A: It's tough, but anybody who keeps his head can reasonably be expected to make it through. The training's a good application of the principle that the mind is the first thing to give way. We've had fit men crack under pressure, and at the same time we've had men who were unfit at enlistment who made it all the way through to the beret.

      Q: What are the things I need to look out for?
      A: 1) Don't bother trying to wayang - if you're doing a good job the instructors will notice it and not say anything, if you're trying to make a show of things you're more likely to get marked. 2) CDOs operate as a team - make sure you help your section and platton mates as much as you can if you have the time and resources available. 3) Along the lines of point 1, don't waste time gobbing off - your effort's better spent getting the job done.

      Q: Can I become an officer if I go to CDO for NS?
      A: Yes, you can, although only a small number get sent to OCS, and that's after they get selected for and pass the CDO section leader course first.

      Q: Do I get CDO pay from enlistment?
      A: Yes, you do. Note, however, that it's kept in reserve until you get the beret, then it's paid as back apy in a lump sum. No beret, no back pay.

      As for the phases and how long they take, it's obviously changed since I left, so I'll leave it to the newer guys to fill in the blanks.

  • Short Ninja's Avatar
    8,421 posts since Jan '07
    • Guards Conversion Courses

      GOCC: Guards Officer Conversion Course

      GSCC: Guards Specialist Conversion Course

      GAIT: Guards Advanced Infantry Training Course

      Edited by eac 05 Apr `16, 12:36PM
    • Originally posted by Gedanken:
      Now that's a realistic scenario. Smile

      I can't recall ever meeting a Tang Peck Onn - then again, he could have been in HQ CDO at the time.

      Perhaps he was one of the finest Cdo and RSM material.But I wont be surprised if he ROD and made something good out of his life.

  • equlus84's Avatar
    434 posts since Nov '05
    • Ok this one is for Guards, moderators, delete the parts you feel might have breached OPSEC.

      Q: What is GCC?

      A: GCC, also known as Guards conversion course, is a rite to get the Khaki beret. Basically, there are GCC for men, specs, officers. These GCC differs from each other as they caters for the needs and operation demands of men, specs, officers. Thus topics emphasis may differ for the 3 grps.

      Q: How long is GCC?

      A: GCC's length is dependent on commitment of the battalion eg. in NDP or any other events. If there is NDP, it is usually 1+ month, if not then around 2.5 to 3 months. If there is NDP, things can get a little cramp up, if not is at an acceptable pace.

      Q: From what I read eg.commercials, urban legends, Guards/GCC very siong leh, machiam like confirm will die...... is it true?

      A: The probability of one dying during GCC is definitely lesser than the probability you get hit by a vehicle. The author was once also frighten, petrified, confused when he received his posting orders many yrs old. But after some time he got used to life inside...... and yes, he is alive and kicking. Just remember that most of the GCC components needs more of team work rather than physical stuff. Of course, you need to be fit, but rest assure, training is safe and progressive. Just like harry potter movie. Remember to be like Harry, sincere, hardworking and modest. Dun be like Hermione(act smart), Ron(hopelessly blur), Draco melfor(Guai lan).

      Q: Oh, I almost forgot, what are Guards anyway?

      A: Well, this question the author have been also pondering it for very long. In theory, Guards are supposed to be heli-borne infantry, that are inserted into enemy terrain to capture a vantage point crucial for gaining a tactical advantage. Being more strike oriented but Guards do not fight in small clandestine units. Be expected to do a little more walking as you may not see the tonners so frequently, as tonners can only move in unless an axis is secured. We are structured very much like the infantry and the author himself at times do not see any difference between GDS and INF.

      Edited by LazerLordz 20 Jun `07, 9:38AM
    • Q: Most important question....What is in GCC?

      A: GCC varies from batches to batches and it is usually up to the individual RSM/ CO of the unit to define what the components are in the GCC.

      1) runs: 5,6,7,8,9,10 KM run with the test runs of 7,9,10 KM. The requirement of 10KM run is 60mins for men and 50mins for commanders. If I did not remember wrongly there is also a 10KM FBO run if I am not wrong.

      2)Rappeling: Normal, Austrian, inverted,walk down. There are live heli-rappeling training sessions. We also do cliff rappeling at this cliff at Changi, forget what the of the cliff is. But it is around 5/6 storey like that. The clif rappeling also do all the above I have mentioned.

      3) Height obstacles: Some batches did the AOC and HCC. But for us, we did the HCC. HCC are series of height obstacles at Hendon camp. The author himself is very scared of height, to this day he is still so. But a word of advice, be brave to take up the first step and things should go smoothly.

      4) Weapons: Like all infantry men, Guardsmen must also learn all the weapons used in SAF. SAR-21, M-16, LAW, M203, these section weapons will be taught and there will be some live firing.

      5) Demolitions: You will be taught how to construct simple man portable explosive devices, that can be used in varies situations, but due to the fact it might breach OPSEC, I don't think I will discuss in detail.

      6) Outfield: there is a 1wk field camp to teach you all those platoon, section drills and movements.

      7) Summex: it is the highlight to the entire GCC, whereby trainees will be put to the test on those things they have learnt for all these whiles. It is a 7D6N and yes, I'm not kidding, non-stop exercise. This exercise is platoon based and section based, redland vs blueland, Umpire based force vs force. Most importantly, IT IS UNRESTRAINED, A.K.A FREE FOR ALL. There are no such things as dig in or harboring. The coy is divided into 2 each led by a platoon commander. Each side is given a set of tasks in which they must complete with a time frame. How the PC plans is up to him eg. fighting patrol, recce, ambush........ At any one time the forces can carry out some operations not as planned if they deem it necessary. eg. The section doing ambush encounters the another section that may happen to be in the vicinity, they can attack them. The only rest time available is the time when troops top up for ammo, water, rations.

      All ammos, food, rations are carried by each trooper on a 3 days basis, and your PS most prob will advise you to bring along spare 1.5litre bottles for water. As a bonus for the exercise. a tonner will carry some commercial, non ration food along a path, thus the PC will organise ambushes of these tonners, if successful, the troops will be rewarded with red-bull, chocolates that are loaded on the tonners!!!

      Another mission I remember, is that they used a PUB station as an imaginary signal tower, one for each sides. Before the exercise, both side will have prepared wooden blocks representing block charges and thick nylon ropes as detonation cords. Both sides are required to attack each others signal towers. BUT OF COURSE, THEY ARE GUARDED BY OOPOSING TROOPS. All these are done in thick foilage, so even have CAT1, they won't call it off.

      8 ) GAC: Guards assault course

      9) Coastal swim: 2Km swim to Tekong with life-jackets. The author himself is a poor swimmer, but some how, he managed to coastal struggle back to the shores.

      10) Amphibious Operations: Trainees will how to do a variety of coastal operations eg. coastal hook, coastal assault. Trainees will learn the concepts, drills and tactics in such ops. They also familiarise on operating from FCEP, FCU, RPL.

      Edited by equlus84 20 Jun `07, 11:36PM
  • Short Ninja's Avatar
    8,421 posts since Jan '07
    • Any guardsmen know where these two good NS officers who signed on in the 80s are today? Chandrasegaran and Chua Jyn Meng

  • equlus84's Avatar
    434 posts since Nov '05
    • Q: What is Guards Assault Course (GAC)?
      A: GAC is a one day course that spans from early afternoon all the way into the late evening. This course will consist of a variety of stations which test the trainees on the skills, drills and techniques taught for the past few weeks. It is a physically enduring course, it is doable and the entire team must help each other in all stations. Done at section level but some stations require the individual involvement of each trainees.
      ( Note that stations may vary from batches to batches )

      Station 1: Run 4 rounds around the red tracks of the stadium in SBO attire less the helmet.

      Station2: Rappeling. Instructor will choose any 2 types of rappeling techniques to test the trainees.

      Station3: FBO SOC. There is no run down. But the entire section must clear the SOC obstacles with full pack on. No timing is required.

      Station4: Fast march around the camp. The distance should be around 2KM or more.

      Station5: Do the various section drills taught eg. flanking, 2 up, 3 up, retrograde drills. At the end. The Umpire will declare one man in the section to be a casualty. The section will FAD him as according to injury. Take out a stretcher. Place him on it and the entire section will carry him around the camp. Upon reaching to the almost the next station. Umpire will call the casualty to be removed from stretcher and the entire section will firemen lift him for abt 200m to the next station.

      Station6: The entire section will push a rover that is laden with many filled jerry cans for abt 100+m and after this. Make a dash for the finishing line which is abt 400m away.

      This may seem very siong, but due to the many details running and doing stations. There should be adequate time and opportunities to rest and take a breather.

  • k2406's Avatar
    213 posts since Jun '07
    • What if one guy in the section cannot clear SOC with FBO…does it mean that the whole section fails?

  • equlus84's Avatar
    434 posts since Nov '05
    • Nope. If that guy cannot clear a particular station, the other guys are expected to chip in and help him. eg. he cannot clear low wall. Others can help to push him.

  • k2406's Avatar
    213 posts since Jun '07
    • Originally posted by equlus84:
      Nope. If that guy cannot clear a particular station, the other guys are expected to chip in and help him. eg. he cannot clear low wall. Others can help to push him.

      I see. What about low rope and swing trainer? How to help..

  • I_love_my_toilet's Avatar
    774 posts since Sep '04
    • Guards Conversion Courses

      GOCC: Guards Officer Conversion Course

      GSCC: Guards Specialist Conversion Course

      GAIT: Guards Advanced Infantry Training Course

      Edited by eac 05 Apr `16, 12:37PM
    • how many atecs, GDS CDO n NDU need to go ?

  • nicholasch's Avatar
    34 posts since Apr '05
    • A Strong NS Training System

      • Strengthen the NS training system by employing an additional 1,100 Regulars in the SAF, and 230 Regulars in the SPF and SCDF, to improve training and inculcate values more effectively. These Regulars will be well-versed in the latest training methods and technology. They can also better emphasise and enforce training safety. As role models, regular trainers will provide our servicemen with a better appreciation of why they train and what they are defending.

       

      More Opportunities for National Servicemen to Contribute

      • Increase leadership opportunities for our servicemen by raising the proportion of officers and specialists from 30% to 40%, to meet new operational needs.
      • Increase deployment flexibility for NSFs by taking into account skills and preferences when deploying servicemen. This would maximise the contributions of NSFs, provide them with a better NS experience and meet our operational requirements.
      • Provide more leadership opportunities and deployment options for servicemen in service vocations (i.e. non-combat vocations) to enable them to contribute more.
      • Enhance the value proposition of NS by accrediting skills that NSFs gain during NS, and enhancing the Certificate of Service to highlight the competencies and skills gained during full-time NS.
      • Provide opportunities for NSFs to contribute as SAF, SPF and SCDF Regulars on short contracts after they have completed their full-time NS. This will enable NSFs to continue to contribute to the defence and security of Singapore while honing important life skills.
      • Provide scholarships to develop talents in engineering and science who will be able to contribute to the 3rd Generation SAF.
      • Expand opportunities for NSmen with relevant civilian expertise to contribute to national defence and security in their areas of expertise.
      • [Details on the Expertise Conversion Scheme have been released. Find out more here.]

      The SAF Volunteer Corps

      • Establish an SAF Volunteer Corps to enable the broader community, especially women, first generation PRs and new citizens, to contribute to defence and strengthen support for NS. [Applications for SAFVC are now open! Find out more here.]

      Recognition and Benefits for National Servicemen

      • Revamp the NS Recognition Award into the NS HOME (HOusing, Medical and Education) Awards to support servicemen in housing, healthcare and education with an additional Medisave component.
      • [Details on the NS HOME Awards have been released. Find out more here.]
      • Provide life and personal accident insurance coverage for our servicemen, to cover incidents during their full-time NS and the period of their ORNS call-ups.

       

      Expand Community Support for National Servicemen

      • Increase recognition for the families of servicemen, such as through an extension of the Family Recognition Voucher (FRV) scheme. The number of NSmen who are awarded FRVs could be increased from the top 10% to the top 30% of ICT performers. The quantum for the top 10% can also be increased.
      • Introduce small gifts to servicemen at significant milestones of their lives, such as marriage or the birth of their child. Just as NS has become a part of NSmen’s lives, we care for them and celebrate joyous moments in their lives too.
      • Restructure the Advisory Council on Community Relations in Defence to comprise (i) an Employer and Business Council; (ii) an Educational Institutions Council; and (iii) a Family and Community Council, to deepen stakeholder engagement. [Restructured ACCORD has been convened. Find out more at ACCORD Website]
      • Enhance awards for employers and individuals supportive of NS. These awards include the “NS Mark” which recognises companies with pro-NS policies and human resource practices, and could be a factor for consideration when companies bid for MINDEF/SAF and Home Team contracts.
      • Strengthen National Education efforts through the SAF Veterans’ League and Home Team Veterans, to impart core national values to the younger generation and boost community support for defence and security.
      • Expand SAFRA and HomeTeamNS recreational facilities for our servicemen and their families.
      • Improve community recognition by supporting community-led initiatives that recognise servicemen and raise public awareness of NS.
      • Facilitate NSFs’ transition to employment and further studies after they complete full-time NS by expanding the range of companies and institutes of higher learning at career fairs.

       

      A Positive NS Experience: Easing Administrative Restrictions

      • Partner NSmen to improve their fitness by giving them more time and flexibility to meet their Individual Physical Proficiency Test (IPPT), IPPT Preparatory Training and Remedial Training requirements.
      • Increase incentive awards for the attainment of Gold, Silver and Pass with Incentive for IPPT, to recognise servicemen who put in the extra effort to keep fit.
      • Engage schools and educational institutions to help pre-enlistees build up their fitness prior to full-time NS.
      • Reduce enlistment wait-time for pre-enlistees to between four and six months after the completion of post-secondary education.
      • Work with tertiary institutions to explore ways to reduce transition time after full-time NS.
      • Change the MINDEF Notification Centre and Home Team Overseas Notification Centre requirements, such that notification will only need to be given for overseas trips of more than 14 days. This will increase convenience for NSmen.
      • [Details on the Overseas Notification Requirements have been released. Find out more here.]
      • Implement Make-up Training for high-key ICTs, which will allow NSmen to keep pace with their ORNS training cycle.
      • Allow NSmen to use electronic devices such as tablets and laptops during their ICT, in non-sensitive areas within their camps like accommodation blocks and cookhouses. This will help NSmen remain connected to their family and work during ICT.
      • Deepen engagement and communication between commanders and servicemen, to achieve better unit cohesion.
      • Establish NS Relations Offices in the SAF, SPF and SCDF to assist NSmen with complex administrative issues.
      • Harness technology to improve NS-related touch points, such as the NS Portal, to make NS administration more efficient and user-friendly.
      Edited by eac 12 Apr `15, 1:04PM
  • orangel's Avatar
    16 posts since May '07
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