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  • aviator-alien's Avatar
    16 posts since Jul '08
    • hey guys,

      notice that there is this constant interest in the air force vocations and the recruitment process. so i figure out that a proper thread on the airforce would hopefully allow all questions to be answered here.

      maybe fellow airforce guys would be able to contribute their respective vocations and help answer some of the questions others might have.

      i am a WSO(C3), so hopefully, i can help answer some of the questions you guys might have with regards to this particular vocation and life as an airforce officer.

      and when we get this thread rolling, maybe the moderators can help by making it sticky! =)

      alright. go ahead with the questions!

    • WSO (C3).

      abit of cut and paste, but the basic physical requirements.

      The Requirements

      As a Weapon Systems Officer, you should be:

      • combat fit (PES A or B)


      Your eyesight should be:

      • normal colour vision
      • not more than 500 degrees per eye for WSO(C3, UAV PILOT & ADA)
      • not more than 200 degrees astigmatism per eye for WSO(C3, NAV, UAV PILOT & ADA)
      • not more than 300 degrees per eye for WSO(FTR)
      • not more than 100 degrees astigmatism per eye for WSO(FTR)


      Academically, you should have a degree, Diploma or a full GCE 'A' Level Certificate.

       

      okay. C3 officers are generally divided into 2 different categories. one dealing with air traffic and the other one dealing with air defence. the air traffic guys would pretty much like those at changi airport control tower, just that theirs would be the respective bases like tengah, sembawang, paya lebar and changi (east).

      on top of the tower guys, air traffic consist of another group of people who does the radar work. they are from the 203 squadron, and they do the vectoring of aircraft and many more.

      the air defence part. you will know when you join.

      basically. C3 officers are air traffic controllers.

       

      C3 officers have intakes for regulars and intakes for NSFs. the NSFs intake is very small, and it only take place twice a year, and per intake. less than 10. these NSFs will be seconded to airbases for their tour of duty, but they will all be trained in basic aerodrome control.

       

      C3 also have the specialist element, and you can check it out under the AOSS scheme of service. these AOSS serve as assistant to controllers and also help out in the day-to-day running of the squadron and its activities.

       

      C3 officers have to undergo interviews, COMPASS test and medical test as part of the selection process, both for the NSFs and the regulars.

  • rs rs's Avatar
    179 posts since Jul '08
    • Hi. erm. can anyone fill me in abt the COMPASS test? like what is it all about and what can i do to prepare for it?

  • sgFish's Avatar
    2,543 posts since Dec '03
    • hello all..i'm currently a pilot trainee with the RSAF and perhaps i'll do one for the pilot-wannabes.

      ---------------------------------------------
      The Requirements (from RSAF website):

      • interest in a military career
      • combat fit (PES A or B)


      Your eyesight should be:

      • normal colour vision
      • not more than 500 degrees per eye
      • correctable to 6/6
      • not more than 200 degrees astigmatism per eye


      Academically, you should have a Degree, Diploma or a full GCE 'A' Level Certificate with passes in English, Maths and Physical Science at 'O' level.

      And if you are planning to study in NUS, NTU or abroad, we will provide a full scholarship under the Local Study Award - Pilot.

      ---------------------------------------------


      The selection process comes in 3 stages. The COMPASS test, which is a 5-hour computerized test which tests your aptitude as a potential pilot, eg. psychomotor skills, multitasking under stress, spatial awareness, decision making and so on.

      Following that is the Pilot Selection Board, which is an interview with a panel of 3-4 RSAF officers, of which one of them would be a pilot, and the main things they're looking for in you is your interest in being an RSAF pilot and also leadership qualities.

      And lastly comes the aeromedical checkup at RSAF Aeromedical Centre, where aviation doctors determine your medical fitness and suitability to operate in an unnatural environment which pilots do.

       

      After passing all the stages of the selection process, you would have to perform well enough during BMT to QUALIFY for OCS. By qualify meaning that your BMT ranking and performance meets OCS requirements, hence if you don't get into OCS through BMT as an NSF, it does not mean that you do not qualify for OCS. However this being said, all aspiring pilots should perform their best during BMT to qualify for OCS.

       

      After BMT, you would go to Air Force School to prepare for your Air Grading Cource (AGC), which is a 6-week flying course of 15 sorties at Tamworth in Australia. This assesses your ability, aptitude and airmanship in handling an aircraft. The aircraft used in this course is the Pacific Aerospace CT/4B, a two-seat aerobatic aircraft pictured below. SYFC PPL holders are exempt from this phase, the only requirement being having to fly 4 aerobatics sorties on SYFC CT/4E before leaving for Basic Wing Course.

       

      After passing AGC, you would go to SAFTI MI for the OCS common leadership module (2 weeks) followed by the Air Force Service Term (7 weeks). This would consist of lectures about RSAF organizational structure and other Air Force related topics, and quite a bit of physical training.

      All RSAF aircrew are required to go through a 10 day Jungle Survival Training (JST) course, hence you would proceed to Brunei after AFST. The JST involves lessons about jungle survival, followed by a 3 day survival test in the jungle, and navigating 4km after that.

       

      After completing your JST, you would return to Air Force School for a 3 month long groundschool course, which consists of theory lessons and examinations regarding flying. Here you would also go through G force endurance training, or G-FET, where you would be taught how to resist G forces with the use of the centrifuge at RSAF Aeromedical Centre.

       

      Following that, you would proceed to Pearce, Australia for a 10 month Basic Wing Course(BWC), which is a full-fledged course which teaches all the basic skills required to be proficient as a military pilot. This is currently conducted on the Pilatus PC-21 aircraft, a tandem 2-seat turboprop military trainer pictured below.

       

      At the end of BWC, pilot trainees would be streamed to either the Fighter Wing Course (FWC), Rotary Wing Course (RWC), or the Transport Wing Course (TWC), to continue your advanced training. The FWC is held in France, and outstanding FWC pilot trainees would go to Canada under the NFTC (NATO Flying Training in Canada) programme. RWC and TWC are held locally in Singapore. These advanced wing courses would last approximately 11 months.

       

      Given all that, pilot wannabes must note that at every stage of this process, countless people are chopped/phased out/washed out, and it is indeed a tough climb to get the coveted pair of RSAF pilot wings. If this happens, you would return to the army to serve the remainder of your NS liability, and if you have none, then ORD loh!


      And getting your wings is just the beginning. As evidenced through many pilots i've spoken to, and also certain forumers, life as a pilot in an operational squadron is no bed of roses. Contrary to the 'glamourous' image an air force pilot's life has among the public, it also comes with many responsibilities and duties, which result in many weekends/public holidays burnt and also odd working hours at certain times. Also, it does not mean that as a RSAF pilot you'd be flying all your life with the RSAF. After a few years of high-key flying and getting your operational status up, most pilots end up with staff jobs in the RSAF, flying only enough to maintain currency. And not to mention the compulsory early retirement age of 44.


      Bottom line is, make sure this is a career choice you would enjoy and not regret before you sign on the dotted line. Do not apply just because people think being a pilot is 'cool' and all.

      Hope this guide answers some questions from all you pilot wannabes out there. I would be glad to entertain any more questions if you all have any.

      Thanks and out.

  • bloodsucker's Avatar
    174 posts since Jun '08
    • Hey sgFish, good to see a pilot trainee around here. Got a few questions that I think u shld be able to answer.

      1) Is there any disadvantage for flat feet people? Cos I didnt declare this during the aeromedical test nor the ns medical. I dunno if pilot training would have any disvantage for us flat feet guys. I didnt declare cos I wanted my PES A status.

      2) Is there any pay disparity btw the different classes of pilot? I.E. fighters earn more than rotary pilots, or rotary earn more than transports etc. I'm not a money grubber, but I'm just curious.

      3) Are apache pilots considered fighter pilots or rotary pilots? My guess would be fighter, since their primary mission is to attack targets.

      4) Is airgrading and bwc very tough? I've flown in syfc until my 1st solo, so I've got a bit of flying backgrnd, but I dunno whether thats enough for the pilot training.

      5) When do rsaf pilots usually get promoted to LTA rank? Right after their pilot training ends? Or is there any other specific requirements?

      Thanks. I'm currently doing my A Levels, and just awaiting for my interview... confused.png

  • kopiosatu's Avatar
    68,593 posts since Jan '03
    • join as Senior Tech lah.

      surely can go in one. teeth.png

      this one have very very very high demand.

  • sbst275's Avatar
    113,395 posts since Jun '04
    • Originally posted by kopiosatu:

      join as Senior Tech lah.

      surely can go in one. teeth.png

      this one have very very very high demand.


      LOL

      somemore needed everywhere

      bo Senior Tech, Pilots dun need to talk of having one teeth.png

      Edited by sbst275 19 Jul `08, 2:36PM
  • teraexa's Avatar
    845 posts since Oct '06
    • I am currently a WSO(C3) Weapons trainee. That means that my job is the part on air defence. All I can say is more JC ppl or scholars can posted to weapons compared to air traffic.

      For those who are considering C3, it's definitely a fulfilling job. You get to learn how to be more composed and control your emotions. I do not recommend it to those who panic easily or blank out under stressful situations. Stammering in speech is a definite negative point too. Nevertheless, such things can always be rectified.

      The COMPASS test is basically a test for your apititudes, like your hand-eye coordination, sense of direction etc. For WSO C3, your geometric appreciation must be good. You must be medically fit, most importantly with good hearing and NOT colour blind (yes green is a colour you see very frequently). C3 has the 2nd highest medical requirements and COMPASS test score cut-off behind pilots.

      For C3 intakes, the past practice used to be 2 to 3 batches per year but now Air Force School are ramping it to 4 a year (one intake per quarter). NSF intake can vary but the chances are very very slim.

      To train as a WSO(C3), you need to go through the whole 9 mth OCS before you are commissioned. 2 weeks of Common Leadership Module with an army wing before you depart for your 7-week Service Term in OCS Air Wing (you will get used to the whistles and bells from your friendly neighbour Mids Wing) and 26 weeks in your Pro Term in Air Force School. 3 weeks of Joint Term will wrap up your officer cadet life.

      Of course, the air force is not all about pilots only. C3s are the ones who support and assist the pilots in carrying out their missions.

      To add on, they are in the midst of upgrading the training facilities (aka the simulator) in Air Force School so those who join now will get the chance to use new stuffs.

      Originally posted by bloodsucker:

       

      3) Are apache pilots considered fighter pilots or rotary pilots? My guess would be fighter, since their primary mission is to attack targets.

      4) Is airgrading and bwc very tough? I've flown in syfc until my 1st solo, so I've got a bit of flying backgrnd, but I dunno whether thats enough for the pilot training.

      5) When do rsaf pilots usually get promoted to LTA rank? Right after their pilot training ends? Or is there any other specific requirements?

       

      I think I can answer these questions because my pilot trainee friends have told me about it.

      For Apache, you will be in 120 Sqn which is basically a helicopter squadron so you are considered rotary (sgFish please clarify further).

      About airgrading course (AGC) and bwc, the chop rate is very high. My service term mate who went through AGC said that 5/10 passing rate for his batch is considered one of the best ever. AGC, in my knowledge, is a test of your airworthiness (whether you can fly well). Nothing other than your airworthiness is considered in AGC. Even scholars don't get favours and can get chopped here (and then they get transferred to C3 or ADA).

      As for promotion, you get comissioned overseas after you finished your specialised wings course. Basically, as a pilot trainee, you remain as an officer cadet (OCT) for the longest period of time.

      Oh sgFish, you do not necessarily go for AGC before service term. There's another route which is going for AFST and JST before being shipped to ground school in Air Force School then to AGC.

      And as sgFish said, being a pilot may seem glamourous but it involves a lot of sacrifice. In fact, no vocation in the RSAF is easy. You have to work hard in your job, especially as a pilot.

  • rey619's Avatar
    435 posts since Feb '08
    • pfff The Chair Force..

      real men join the army and be AN AIRBORNE RANGER!

      HOO RAH RANGERS LEAD THE WAY!

      DONT WANNA BE A CHAIRBORNE RANGER! LOL

      THE ARMY: LEADING THE WAY!

  • gd4u's Avatar
    5,181 posts since Jan '06
    • Originally posted by rey619:

      pfff The Chair Force..

      real men join the army and be AN AIRBORNE RANGER!

      HOO RAH RANGERS LEAD THE WAY!

      DONT WANNA BE A CHAIRBORNE RANGER! LOL

      THE ARMY: LEADING THE WAY!

      Without the pilot flying the plane ... i doubt u could go Airborne ....

  • Moderator
    eac's Avatar
    4,003 posts since Dec '03
    • Originally posted by gd4u:

      Without the pilot flying the plane ... i doubt u could go Airborne ....


      good one.

  • sgFish's Avatar
    2,543 posts since Dec '03
    • Originally posted by bloodsucker:

       

      Hey sgFish, good to see a pilot trainee around here. Got a few questions that I think u shld be able to answer.

      1) Is there any disadvantage for flat feet people? Cos I didnt declare this during the aeromedical test nor the ns medical. I dunno if pilot training would have any disvantage for us flat feet guys. I didnt declare cos I wanted my PES A status.

      Shouldn't have any disadvantage..unless it affects you during physical training during BMT and OCS, and that might cause some problems

      2) Is there any pay disparity btw the different classes of pilot? I.E. fighters earn more than rotary pilots, or rotary earn more than transports etc. I'm not a money grubber, but I'm just curious.

      Yep. The fighter boys get more flying allowance than non-fighter boys i.e. there are 2 different sets of paygrades (for FA) and criteria for fighters and non-fighters.

      3) Are apache pilots considered fighter pilots or rotary pilots? My guess would be fighter, since their primary mission is to attack targets.

      Not very sure, but my guess would lean towards non-fighter

      4) Is airgrading and bwc very tough? I've flown in syfc until my 1st solo, so I've got a bit of flying backgrnd, but I dunno whether thats enough for the pilot training.

      As tereaxa said, the chop rate at AGC is rather high, and BWC though lower, has still a substantial chop rate. I wouldn't know about either because i haven't gone for BWC yet, and I skipped AGC as I had a PPL from SYFC. Your flight experience at SYFC would come in a little handy when you go for AGC though.

      5) When do rsaf pilots usually get promoted to LTA rank? Right after their pilot training ends? Or is there any other specific requirements?

      If i'm not wrong, they get their 2LT after BWC, and their LTA in the middle of their FWC/RWC/TWC

      Thanks. I'm currently doing my A Levels, and just awaiting for my interview... confused.png

      I see...good that you applied early. The selection process takes a hell long time. All the best dude =)

      Originally posted by teraexa:

      Oh sgFish, you do not necessarily go for AGC before service term. There's another route which is going for AFST and JST before being shipped to ground school in Air Force School then to AGC.

       

       Yep that's true. Depends on whether the slot for AGC or OCS comes first after you sign..they try to reduce the lobo time.

      Just curious, teraexa are you at OCS now or at AFS?

      Edited by sgFish 09 Aug `08, 10:05AM
  • ChengYong's Avatar
    62 posts since May '04
    • Originally posted by sgFish:

      hello all..i'm currently a pilot trainee with the RSAF and perhaps i'll do one for the pilot-wannabes.

      ---------------------------------------------
      The Requirements (from RSAF website):

      • interest in a military career
      • combat fit (PES A or B)


      Your eyesight should be:

      • normal colour vision
      • not more than 500 degrees per eye
      • correctable to 6/6
      • not more than 200 degrees astigmatism per eye


      Academically, you should have a Degree, Diploma or a full GCE 'A' Level Certificate with passes in English, Maths and Physical Science at 'O' level.

      And if you are planning to study in NUS, NTU or abroad, we will provide a full scholarship under the Local Study Award - Pilot.

      ---------------------------------------------


      The selection process comes in 3 stages. The COMPASS test, which is a 5-hour computerized test which tests your aptitude as a potential pilot, eg. psychomotor skills, multitasking under stress, spatial awareness, decision making and so on.

      Following that is the Pilot Selection Board, which is an interview with a panel of 3-4 RSAF officers, of which one of them would be a pilot, and the main things they're looking for in you is your interest in being an RSAF pilot and also leadership qualities.

      And lastly comes the aeromedical checkup at RSAF Aeromedical Centre, where aviation doctors determine your medical fitness and suitability to operate in an unnatural environment which pilots do.

       

      After passing all the stages of the selection process, you would have to perform well enough during BMT to QUALIFY for OCS. By qualify meaning that your BMT ranking and performance meets OCS requirements, hence if you don't get into OCS through BMT as an NSF, it does not mean that you do not qualify for OCS. However this being said, all aspiring pilots should perform their best during BMT to qualify for OCS.

       

      After BMT, you would go to Air Force School to prepare for your Air Grading Cource (AGC), which is a 6-week flying course of 15 sorties at Tamworth in Australia. This assesses your ability, aptitude and airmanship in handling an aircraft. The aircraft used in this course is the Pacific Aerospace CT/4B, a two-seat aerobatic aircraft pictured below. SYFC PPL holders are exempt from this phase, the only requirement being having to fly 4 aerobatics sorties on SYFC CT/4E before leaving for Basic Wing Course.

       

      After passing AGC, you would go to SAFTI MI for the OCS common leadership module (2 weeks) followed by the Air Force Service Term (7 weeks). This would consist of lectures about RSAF organizational structure and other Air Force related topics, and quite a bit of physical training.

      All RSAF aircrew are required to go through a 10 day Jungle Survival Training (JST) course, hence you would proceed to Brunei after AFST. The JST involves lessons about jungle survival, followed by a 3 day survival test in the jungle, and navigating 4km after that.

       

      After completing your JST, you would return to Air Force School for a 3 month long groundschool course, which consists of theory lessons and examinations regarding flying. Here you would also go through G force endurance training, or G-FET, where you would be taught how to resist G forces with the use of the centrifuge at RSAF Aeromedical Centre.

       

      Following that, you would proceed to Pearce, Australia for a 10 month Basic Wing Course(BWC), which is a full-fledged course which teaches all the basic skills required to be proficient as a military pilot. This is currently conducted on the Pilatus PC-21 aircraft, a tandem 2-seat turboprop military trainer pictured below.

       

      At the end of BWC, pilot trainees would be streamed to either the Fighter Wing Course (FWC), Rotary Wing Course (RWC), or the Transport Wing Course (TWC), to continue your advanced training. The FWC is held in France, and outstanding FWC pilot trainees would go to Canada under the NFTC (NATO Flying Training in Canada) programme. RWC and TWC are held locally in Singapore. These advanced wing courses would last approximately 11 months.

       

      Given all that, pilot wannabes must note that at every stage of this process, countless people are chopped/phased out/washed out, and it is indeed a tough climb to get the coveted pair of RSAF pilot wings. If this happens, you would return to the army to serve the remainder of your NS liability, and if you have none, then ORD loh!


      And getting your wings is just the beginning. As evidenced through many pilots i've spoken to, and also certain forumers, life as a pilot in an operational squadron is no bed of roses. Contrary to the 'glamourous' image an air force pilot's life has among the public, it also comes with many responsibilities and duties, which result in many weekends/public holidays burnt and also odd working hours at certain times. Also, it does not mean that as a RSAF pilot you'd be flying all your life with the RSAF. After a few years of high-key flying and getting your operational status up, most pilots end up with staff jobs in the RSAF, flying only enough to maintain currency. And not to mention the compulsory early retirement age of 44.


      Bottom line is, make sure this is a career choice you would enjoy and not regret before you sign on the dotted line. Do not apply just because people think being a pilot is 'cool' and all.

      Hope this guide answers some questions from all you pilot wannabes out there. I would be glad to entertain any more questions if you all have any.

      Thanks and out.


      Hi. I was just wondering how do we apply for the selection? I'm currently a yr 2 poly student and do i have to take up the scholarship thing for selection? Anyways what will happen if i happen to be chopped off in the process of the training? Will i be posted to somewhere else and must i still serve the 10 years bond as other post?

       

  • sgFish's Avatar
    2,543 posts since Dec '03
    • Originally posted by ChengYong:


      Hi. I was just wondering how do we apply for the selection? I'm currently a yr 2 poly student and do i have to take up the scholarship thing for selection? Anyways what will happen if i happen to be chopped off in the process of the training? Will i be posted to somewhere else and must i still serve the 10 years bond as other post?

       

      you can either apply online or through mail by the application forms. The LSA (Pilot) is offered to all pilots who qualify for a local university and have completed training and attained operational status category B. However you have the option to either take it or leave it, either by not going to university or taking a self sponsered no-pay study leave. If you are chopped due to the fact that you tried your best but still cannot make it, then the contract is void and you would not have any bond to serve, just serve the rest of your 2 years NS liability and ORD happily =)

      Edited by sgFish 20 Jul `08, 2:25PM
  • ChengYong's Avatar
    62 posts since May '04
    • Originally posted by sgFish:

      you can either apply online or through mail by the application forms. The LSA (Pilot) is offered to all pilots who qualify for a local university and have completed training and attained operational status category B. However you have the option to either take it or leave it, either by not going to university or taking a self sponsered no-pay study leave. If you are chopped due to the fact that you tried your best but still cannot make it, then the contract is void and you would not have any bond to serve, just serve the rest of your 2 years NS liability and ORD happily =)


      so for my case i can just apply for the selection instead of signing on? and if i happen to pass the selection, is it neccessary to sign a 10 yr bond? the scholarship which i mentioned is the one which they pay for ur poly sch fees and providing you monthly allowance.

       

      what will happen if i take up the scholarship, and i happen to get chopped of in the process of training? do i have to pay them back? or would the contract be voided?

  • bloodsucker's Avatar
    174 posts since Jun '08
    • Originally posted by ChengYong:


      so for my case i can just apply for the selection instead of signing on? and if i happen to pass the selection, is it neccessary to sign a 10 yr bond? the scholarship which i mentioned is the one which they pay for ur poly sch fees and providing you monthly allowance.

       

      what will happen if i take up the scholarship, and i happen to get chopped of in the process of training? do i have to pay them back? or would the contract be voided?

      To be an air force pilot, u MUST sign on. You cant serve as a pilot in your NS. And also if u take up the LSA (Pilot), u must be a Cat B pilot, as stated by sgFish. And this will happen many years after your training ends. So dont worry about paying them back cos of being chopped from training.

  • ChengYong's Avatar
    62 posts since May '04
    • Originally posted by bloodsucker:

      To be an air force pilot, u MUST sign on. You cant serve as a pilot in your NS. And also if u take up the LSA (Pilot), u must be a Cat B pilot, as stated by sgFish. And this will happen many years after your training ends. So dont worry about paying them back cos of being chopped from training.


      i see. thanks alot anyway guys.

       

      cheers.

      Edited by ChengYong 20 Jul `08, 5:54PM
  • funkydude10's Avatar
    3 posts since Jan '07
  • sgFish's Avatar
    2,543 posts since Dec '03
  • teraexa's Avatar
    845 posts since Oct '06
    • Originally posted by sgFish:

       Yep that's true. Depends on whether the slot for AGC or OCS comes first after you sign..they try to reduce the lobo time.

      Just curious, teraexa are you at OCS now or at AFS?

      in AFS now serving my pro term. should be comissioning this dec if nothing goes wrong.

  • cydus21's Avatar
    58 posts since Jun '07
    • hi guys. anyone of u knows of anyone who gets rejected due to short arm length? like only 1cm short? I've recently been told I am 1cm short and the medical board rejected my application. I tried to appeal for a review and it is in process. What are the chances of success in this review? Maybe like a sit to fit in simulator cockpit kinda test instead?

  • aviator-alien's Avatar
    16 posts since Jul '08
    • some stuff to add on to teraexa.

      there is no preferences that scholars or 'A' Levels students goes to Weapons, although it is true that Weapons is a all regular vocation, whereas Air traffic does have NSFs officer cadets selected from OCS.

      Apache are classified as rotary pilot, but i am sure their flying and pilot allowance is slightly different.

      cydus21, there is a section during the aeromedical test that you are supposed to sit in a cockpit-lookalike thing, i am not too sure whether you have done it. i am not too sure how do they go about doing it, but maybe one of the pilot trainees can enlighten you on this.

       

      oh. teraexa, good luck for your course! hah. its never easy in school, especially during simulator times, but trust me, it gets worse in the units!

  • Macarto.chan's Avatar
    12 posts since Aug '08
    • Hi, I am currently a College student and have received the letter for my compass test which is on the 6 aug. Can Rsaf pilot trainees or People who have passed the test give me an insight of how should i go about to improve my chances of getting through the test. I know that i will still have many more selection phases to go on after the compass test if i pass it. Maybe someone who have gone through the test can share his experience with me and the procedure there? Thank you.

  • Rednano's Avatar
    6,522 posts since May '08
    • Originally posted by Macarto.chan:

      Hi, I am currently a College student and have received the letter for my compass test which is on the 6 aug. Can Rsaf pilot trainees or People who have passed the test give me an insight of how should i go about to improve my chances of getting through the test. I know that i will still have many more selection phases to go on after the compass test if i pass it. Maybe someone who have gone through the test can share his experience with me and the procedure there? Thank you.


      2hr: hand at controller joystick-eye coordination with computer flight cockpit game, with some altitude calculation, some navigator meter and stuff; some memory test with those sequencing quiz, and some with some audio command headphone.

      another 2hr: personality test on OMR sheet, 2b pencil after the short break.

  • Macarto.chan's Avatar
    12 posts since Aug '08
    • May i know what attire to where and how should i prepare myself for the compass test? Personality test is all about honesty but what about the flight simulator game which one will undergo? I heard the cutting rate for compass test is 70%. Is there anything i can do to increase my chances of making it through? Will they ask me about knowlegde of planes during CPSS or will they teach us the basics before asking us to fly the simulator? If i dont know should i be honest and tell them i dont know before they ask me to do anything? Sorry for so many questions but i would appreciate if someone could help me out. I really want to experience the progress to becoming a full fledged pilot and it has always been my true passion. Thanks

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