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60 reportedly injured after Jurong Shipyard jackup rig tilts

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  • troublemaker2005's Avatar
    8,443 posts since Dec '05
    • HR: people want cheap. who cares?! taht's why they are her. they rais eteh salary sgreans already filled the gaps already! and with the low birthrate thansk to the HLfamily head's fstop 2 policy, we cannot replace our aging and dead population fast enough to take on the jobs.

      faster: yest besides all the above mentioned as possible root causes, how about oeprations and procedures. is the load too mush or speed too fast for the braking to be effective? was any protocol violated?

      that's why isay its still partly gahmen to blame. somany unskilled labor around, who let them in? MOM jsut allow companies or their middle people to handle and they just approve only lah? MOM should have people technically inclined the athe aresas of work to also review the cheap labors tht comes in if certain ckill set ios required, interview them if need to.

       

      like that is fast mah. i can bet this is not teh first time they doing this or might have broken the standard oeprtaing protocol and relates to safety. only last time many times nothing happen but now i guess we made it in the news.

       

      cheaper, cheapest, faster, too fast. now see lah, better all can rest close shop and sleep on bed

      Edited by troublemaker2005 04 Dec `12, 3:31PM
  • Lazybumy's Avatar
    328 posts since Jun '08
    • Originally posted by zulkifli mahmood:


      Then why on earth they did the testing of the jacking mechanism on one of the legs of the oil rig knowing that there are workers onboard? Its that the correct high level safety and quality protocol practise in Singapore shipyard?


      Hope you dun mind that I point out this, I dun think that they are doing the load testing when there are workers onboard. They indiciate that the loadtest was already done (I presume when they mention this, it mean that this system had been commissioning already). But i do agree to wait for further information as now it is just piece of information which still dun can't show the full picture. Below is the statement - Mr Wong said initial investigations showed the braking system on one of the movable legs of the rig had failed, causing the platform to slide down the leg on that side. Load tests run on the rig just a day before the accident had shown the three legs of the rig could bear a load of some 9000 tonnes each, said Mr Wong.

    • Originally posted by zulkifli mahmood:

      Yeap, some foreign workers if they unhappy with the management, they care less about safety, efficiency and productivity. They could even purposely do a poor job on the project knowing that through time it would be damaged or destroyed. That is sabotage. Maybe MRT system was like that too.


      Agree with this as I had come across such sabotage when there are people who on purpose cut the wire cable when I am on one project assignment in SG (Nobody know who did this but there are warning sign claiming that this is a crime and will be send to police if caught. Though after end of the project as we did not manage to get the person, I can't tell that it is a local or foreigner doing this)

    • Originally posted by troublemaker2005:


      what if design and engineering no issue? what if its a poor weld or imappropriate equipment installation? workers dont know how to interpret or never do as per instructed?, AND even shit the inspectors failed to catch the problem or skipped some aras of checking?


      It is possible as according to the statement, the system had been load test the day before. But just to correct you normally the worker is not the one to interpret but the engineer and the inspectors is suppose to check the work. Actually fyi, I know who is the client/owner of this rig and i know that this company (which is a US company) tend to hire alot of FT inspectors/engineer from country P, I and C as their recruitment agency tend to supply them with staffs from this few countries. However at the moment, the whole report is not out yet so nobody know what happen yet.

  • ditzy's Avatar
    67,491 posts since Dec '03
  • charlize's Avatar
    30,264 posts since Mar '05
  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    244,854 posts since Dec '99
    • Singaporean engineer Nur'Rahmahdiah Salim, 22, felt the floor tilting to one side as she inspected the fifth-storey of the living quarters of an oil rig under construction at Jurong Shipyard.

      What followed was mayhem and chaos as the oil rig tilted after one of its three legs gave way.

      Immediately, she shouted to the workers with her to drop their equipment and hold on to poles.

      When she heard other workers shouting for people to get out, she told her workers to do the same.

      But she did not heed her own advice. Instead, she went to every room on every floor and made sure that no worker was left behind.

      Even when she was hit by an unknown project, she persisted.

      Read the full report in The New Paper on Thursday (Dec 6).

       

       

       

      got typo

  • ditzy's Avatar
    67,491 posts since Dec '03
    • 5th storey would be the heli waiting room already, its really just a room with 4 walls.

      Anyway here's a picture I took of one corner of one leg from a rig I'm on currently. I'm too lazy to flip the pic.

  • charlize's Avatar
    30,264 posts since Mar '05
  • zulkifli mahmood's Avatar
    4,218 posts since Feb '05
    • Originally posted by Lazybumy:


      Hope you dun mind that I point out this, I dun think that they are doing the load testing when there are workers onboard. They indiciate that the loadtest was already done (I presume when they mention this, it mean that this system had been commissioning already). But i do agree to wait for further information as now it is just piece of information which still dun can't show the full picture. Below is the statement - Mr Wong said initial investigations showed the braking system on one of the movable legs of the rig had failed, causing the platform to slide down the leg on that side. Load tests run on the rig just a day before the accident had shown the three legs of the rig could bear a load of some 9000 tonnes each, said Mr Wong.


      Ok. Initially when I read the news in yahoo when the accident had occurred, it mentioned that the testing was done while the workers were onboard. I know someone who is a freelance marine engineer, when they mentioned a 22 year old female engineer was injured, thought it was her and made a quick check and glad it wasn't.

  • Lazybumy's Avatar
    328 posts since Jun '08
    • Originally posted by charlize:

      How to straighten the legs again ? icon_lol.gif


      Did they mention that the jack leg had bend??

    • Originally posted by zulkifli mahmood:


      Ok. Initially when I read the news in yahoo when the accident had occurred, it mentioned that the testing was done while the workers were onboard. I know someone who is a freelance marine engineer, when they mentioned a 22 year old female engineer was injured, thought it was her and made a quick check and glad it wasn't.


      Quite lucky on this case also. But I thought when conducting such loadtest, people should not be onboard.

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    244,854 posts since Dec '99
  • ditzy's Avatar
    67,491 posts since Dec '03
    • Originally posted by Lazybumy:


      Quite lucky on this case also. But I thought when conducting such loadtest, people should not be onboard.

      If those legs can get bent, flying to mars, would be as easy as flying to London.

      It was reported that the load tests were done the day before, not on the day it happened. It happened on a normal working day, and the brakes on the motors failed.

      Of course they don't need so many on board while doing it, but they still need guys to in the control room running those legs, a few guys more checking this and that, and a whole lot of guys at each leg just to make sure its moving the way it should.

      And that's how its done, yes, I took it in Singapore.

  • Lazybumy's Avatar
    328 posts since Jun '08
    • Originally posted by ditzy:

      If those legs can get bent, flying to mars, would be as easy as flying to London.

      It was reported that the load tests were done the day before, not on the day it happened. It happened on a normal working day, and the brakes on the motors failed.

      Of course they don't need so many on board while doing it, but they still need guys to in the control room running those legs, a few guys more checking this and that, and a whole lot of guys at each leg just to make sure its moving the way it should.

      And that's how its done, yes, I took it in Singapore.


      That is why I ask as someone mention that the jack leg had bend which is quite rare though pls, it is still possible, I saw it happen offshore before. That also why i mention that there should be no workers onboard during loadtest. It should be be couple of commissioning guys which are client rep, class rep, a couple of yard guys, and a few operation guy that running the system. And that should be all, I can't think of any other people that need to go onboard. During that time, there should not be any other work being done. At least that how SG practice and all the different place that I know practice.

  • troublemaker2005's Avatar
    8,443 posts since Dec '05
    • we wanna know what happened?! not stroies of heroics and casualities and evacution. right now what's teh sstatius of teh investigation? engineer for this type of works still using freelance 1 arh?! these are real mission critical operations that requires someone familar with this particular installation and THIS particular work environemnt. why are there freelance positions fior engineers?!

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    244,854 posts since Dec '99
  • Lazybumy's Avatar
    328 posts since Jun '08
    • Originally posted by troublemaker2005:

      we wanna know what happened?! not stroies of heroics and casualities and evacution. right now what's teh sstatius of teh investigation? engineer for this type of works still using freelance 1 arh?! these are real mission critical operations that requires someone familar with this particular installation and THIS particular work environemnt. why are there freelance positions fior engineers?!


      Actually freelance engineers is very common in this industry. Most project prefer to hire freelance so that once the project is completed, they can just release the person. And freelance does not mean that they are not skill.

  • ditzy's Avatar
    67,491 posts since Dec '03
    • Originally posted by troublemaker2005:

      we wanna know what happened?! not stroies of heroics and casualities and evacution. right now what's teh sstatius of teh investigation? engineer for this type of works still using freelance 1 arh?! these are real mission critical operations that requires someone familar with this particular installation and THIS particular work environemnt. why are there freelance positions fior engineers?!

      I have a full time job, but in between, I sometimes have a huge lull between jobs, and my full time job lets me work from home, so I freelance as an engineer for another company to check engineering drawings when I have time, can supplement my income leh.

      To answer your question, this industry is not "real mission critical" as what you think. It only becomes that case when that particular installation is out the yard, and making an obcene amount of money. The shipyard employs, and outsources its vendors, and sub contractors, so these vendors, and sub contractors would be the one engaging their own staff, and yes they could be freelance. Most of the freelance positions I've come across for this industry are rope access guys, and divers. They don't get a basic monthly pay, but they do get a day rate, which commensurates with the risk of the job.

      Edited by ditzy 08 Dec `12, 6:46PM
  • troublemaker2005's Avatar
    8,443 posts since Dec '05
    • ithink should be 'contract' bassis. project over, that's it. freelance seems like too amateur a term, really.

  • Queen of sgForums
    驚世駭俗醜不啦嘰 moderatress
    FireIce's Avatar
    244,854 posts since Dec '99
  • ditzy's Avatar
    67,491 posts since Dec '03
  • zulkifli mahmood's Avatar
    4,218 posts since Feb '05
    • Originally posted by FireIce:

      22yo freelance marine engineer

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      cool.


      My freelance female marine engineer friend, she told me that she is 24 years old not 22 years old....and that is also cool for her to be in that marine industry whereby male dominated in that profession.

    • Originally posted by Lazybumy:


      Actually freelance engineers is very common in this industry. Most project prefer to hire freelance so that once the project is completed, they can just release the person. And freelance does not mean that they are not skill.


      And not only that but as a freelance marine engineer you can earn more I think. My friend earns a fixs basic salary of $2000 per month regardless whether she goes onboard the vessel or not and the extra incentive is each time she goes onboard she gets paid $800 but I'm not sure whether there is any monthly CPF contribution from her boss or deduction from her gross monthly salary.

      Edited by zulkifli mahmood 11 Dec `12, 2:24PM
  • Army 21's Avatar
    548 posts since Jun '12
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